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Letter from MLK to Sara B. Jackson

Friday, April 13, 1956

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mrs. Jackson for her moral and financial support.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1962

In this letter to Dr. King, Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College informs Dr. King about the meeting with Robert Troutman on matters that involve input from President Kennedy.

Worship

Dr. King critiques the Protestant Church worship services.

Letter from Joe C. Sullivan to MLK

Wednesday, June 10, 1964

Mr. Sullivan assures Dr. King of his and his wife's support for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Sullivan, a white Baptist, also expresses discontent over the number of prejudiced people within his race and faith.

Letter from James Haughton to a Friend regarding Fundraising

Thursday, February 1, 1968

In this letter James Houghton, of the Committee for a Winter Confrontation with Congress, appeals to friends for financial support of the "poor peoples lobby."

Advice for Living

Advice for Living is a column Dr. King uses to help people with moral dilemmas. In this issue, he receives questions from an 18-year old about his mother's drinking issues, a 24-year old with relationship issues, and others.

Letter from George G. Hill to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

George Hill expresses that he will continue to support the SCLC but feels the need to make two suggestions regarding the Alabama boycott and Vietnam War. He questions the use of economic force in obtaing equal rights and suggests the need to connect with underprivileged around the world.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa: Advance Registration

Monday, January 9, 1967

Theodore E. Brown, the Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, sends a letter with attached registration forms for the Third Biennial National Conference.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Monday, January 23, 1967

R. W. Boone sends this Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Routing Slip to Dr. King. The slip lists the name "Andy," which could be in reference to King's associate Andrew Young.

Nonviolence

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Letter from Walter Martin to SCLC Officials

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

Walter Martin of the American Friends Service Committee, writes to numerous SCLC officials concerning Quaker work in Southern Africa.

Letter from Alfredo Gomez Gil to MLK

Sheila M. Rogers writes Dr. King in place of her friend Alfredo Gil, who has written a poem in Spanish about the plight of blacks. Rogers has translated the poem and sent it to Dr. King in support of the work he is doing for blacks in the United States.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

How My Theology Has Changed

Dr. King highlights seven main ways in which his theological views have changed since his final year at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea

Sunday, March 14, 1965

Woodlawn Community Services Agency issues an invitation to come to the 24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea where Dr. King will be honored.

MLK to the Second Precinct Clergymen's Association

Thursday, March 26, 1964

Dr. King gives a statement to the Second Precinct Clergymen's Association in Washington, D. C. regarding voter registration and the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts, "I understand that voter registration here has reached a mark just short of 170,000."

Letter from Sandy F. Ray Regarding "Holy Land Pilgrimage"

Monday, July 17, 1967

Sandy F. Ray, president of Concreta Tours writes a letter sharing the details concerning Dr. King's Holy Land Pilgrimage. She explains that an office representative recently returned from the Middle East "with first hand information regarding tour conditions there." This document includes a report on hotels, roads, inhabitants, and basic information permitting travel to Israel and the West Bank of Jordan.

Letter from US Attorney General Robert Kennedy Forwarded to MLK

Friday, May 8, 1964

John L. Murphy writes Dr. King to forward him a letter for the Reverend from US Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that his office received in error. In the forwarded letter, Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his willingness to contribute to a series of oral interviews for the John F. Kennedy library.

King Assails Westmoreland, Praises Clay

This article discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King asserts that the US is on the wrong side of the war and denounces it during a speech at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

Emancipation Proclamation Dinner Program

Dr. King speaks at a dinner engagement honoring the centennial anniversary of The Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from MLK to Richard V. Grulich

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Mr. Grulich regarding U.S. foreign policy, asserting that the federal government needs to develop the "moral courage" to admit past mistakes.

Letter from a Disgruntled Author

The author expresses his grievances towards Dr. King and his leadership of the civil rights movement.

Telegram from Lawrence MacGregor to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1967

In this telegram, Lawrence J. MacGregor informs Dr. King that there will no longer be a memorial service for Rufus E. Clement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Queen Mother Moore

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dora McDonald communicates with Queen Mother Moore to discuss Dr. King's inability to meet with her prior to the Washington Campaign for Jobs or Income. Queen Mother Moore was an important figure during the Civil Right Movement and a founder of the Republic of New Afrika.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

While in Ghana, Mr. John Lewis congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Lewis states, "the Nobel Peace Prize Committee had no choice but to select you for such an honor."

Draft Letter from MLK to Reverend Jackson

Dr. King replies to Rev. Jackson's letter of April 22. He apologizes for the delay and assures Rev. Jackson that he will send thank you messages to everyone listed in his initial letter. Dr. King also tells Rev. Jackson that he hopes their friendship has not been affected by recent circumstances.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the US Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a joint telegram concerning an investigation in Lee County, Georgia.