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Letter from Stephen Siteman to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter to Dr. King, Stephen Siteman encloses a letter that Norman Thomas wrote for the New York Times.

Letter from Isaac Foster Regarding a Scholarship

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
New York, NY

Isaac Foster, a student at Queens College, informs his reader of reasons why he should be awarded a scholarship.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Draft Law

Sunday, July 30, 1967
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives an anonymous letter regarding the revision of Draft Law. The author states that the July 1, 1967 revision of the law allows regulations that further burden the military service to lower income groups, specifically Negroes, instead of requiring that Military service be spread more equally. The author encloses the State Memorandum No. 6-21, which was issued by the Illinois State Director of Selective Service on July 19, 1967.

Birmingham Manifesto

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama by the African American community and the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights.

Telegram from Stanley G. Grizzle to MLK

Monday, September 13, 1965
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA

Stanley G. Grizzle, Chairman of the Toronto chapter of the Martin Luther King Fund, urges Dr. King to accept the International Teach-In invitation.

Sincerity and Intelligence

Dr. King reviews the Christian teaching of sincerity and its relationship to intelligence. Referencing Judaistic history and a biblical story involving the Apostle Paul, he comments that sincerity alone is lacking. He insists that Christians must infuse their sincerity with intelligence in order to "solve the spiritual problems of the world."

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Monday, August 20, 1962
Albany, GA, INDIA, New York (NY)

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Two Noted Rights Workers Added to Staff of SCEF

New Orleans, LA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article explains Ella J. Baker and John R. Salter were added to the New Orleans based Southern Christian Educational Fund shortly before its headquarters were raided by more than 100 policemen on October 4th.

Letter from Thomas H. Uzzell

Monday, July 16, 1962
Oklahoma (OK)

Thomas Uzzell asks Dr. King to read his book entitled, "The Twilight of Self-Government." Mr. Uzzell's book deals with the racial crisis in America and how it "can be solved in a democratic manner."

Letter from Ernest Evans to MLK about Help

Wednesday, February 23, 1966
Chicago, IL

Ernest Evans is writing to Dr. King asking him to come by his home while he is visiting Chicago. Evans discusses the problems of his living conditions and the increase in the cost of living. He hopes that Dr. King will be able to bring about positive change for the community.

Letter from the United Nations to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
CANADA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Robin Skuce, Education Secretary of the United Nations Association in Canada, writes Dr. King inquiring of his availability to lecture at a seminar for high school students at their New York headquarters.

Telegram from Andrew Allen to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

Pastor Andrew J. Allen offers to serve Dr. King's jail term for him.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS)

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Letter from MLK to James M. Kangongoi

Monday, April 16, 1962
PUERTO RICO, KENYA

Dr. King writes Mr. James M. Kangongoi acknowledging the receipt of his letter and expressing how good it was to meet him in Puerto Rico.

Letter from Carl Albert to MLK

Friday, October 20, 1967
Oklahoma (OK), Washington, D.C.

In this letter, U.S. Congressman Carl Albert offers his gratitude to Dr. King regarding a letter he sent to him about problems in the country.

Worship Must Have Three Things

Dr. King states that "worship" must have three things: unity, movement, and rhythm.

Letter from Homer Littlefield McCall to MLK

Thursday, September 21, 1967
Alabama (AL)

In this letter, Mr. McCall requests that Dr. King send the certificate of his ordination from Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Invitation Program to the 1966 Upper Room Citation

London, England, Nashville, TN

The following document is an invitation program from the Rev. Dr. Manning and the Upper Room inviting guests to attend the 1966 Upper Room Citation at the Grand Ballroom, London Hilton Hotel in London, England.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Thursday, February 24, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Unitarianism

Dr. King describes the theology of Unitarianism as being a contrast to Trinitarianism.

Letter from MLK to E. D. Johnson

Monday, April 30, 1962
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to E. D. Johnson's letter expressing appreciation for encouragement by providing knowledge regarding the arrogance of Mr. Johnson's son. Dr. King stresses the importance of valuing the internal factors of self-respect, integrity and selflessness, opposed to the external factors of color, skin and wealth.

Letter from SCLC to Lizzie Williams

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Selma, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

A representative of the Citizenship Education Program, an initiative of the SCLC, informs Mrs. Willis of recent travel plans to Dorchester, GA. Dorchester academy played a vital role in the struggle for voting and civil rights.

Crusade For Citizenship

Texas (TX), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Florida (FL), Little Rock, AR, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Memphis, TN, New Orleans, LA, Tallahassee, FL, Atlanta, GA, Louisville, KY

"Crusade For Citizenship," an initiative of the SCLC, illustrates the importance of Negro voters in the South. The brochure incorporates important facts to implement emphasis on how imperative the cause is.

MLK's Graduation Picture From Boston University

Monday, June 1, 1959
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

This photograph captures Dr. King in his graduation gown from Boston University.

Letter from The Downtown Charity Club to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C.

The Downtown Charity Club wishes to accompany Dr. King from the Baltimore headquarters for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from C. R. Sanders to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
South Carolina (SC)

In this letter, Mr. Carl Sanders informs Dr. King that the WSPA station is extending him an opportunity to respond, to an adverse editorial that will be aired.

Letter from PLAYBOY Magazine to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, London, England, Illinois (IL), UNITED KINGDOM, GERMANY, Washington, D.C., RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, FRANCE, ITALY, JAPAN, PAKISTAN, TURKEY, CAMBODIA, Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY), Michigan (MI), INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Playboy Editorial Director A.C. Spectorsky requests comments from Dr. King regarding Kenneth Tynan's article "Open Letter to an American Liberal," which accompanies the letter.

Fleeing From God

This sermon, delivered by Dr. King on April 4, 1956, discusses the human desire to escape God. Dr. King attributes this inclination to the fact that man wants to hide from God's immanent nature and harbors a general unwillingness to follow God's commandments.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration Reception

Washington, D.C.

The Distinguished Hospitality Committee of the Inaugural Committee invite Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a reception preceding the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Wipe Out Police Brutality

Wednesday, January 1, 1964
Tennessee (TN), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.