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Darien Seeking Negro Teachers

Thursday, November 26, 1964

This article discusses the teacher exchange program between New York City Public Schools and Darien, Connecticut. The program calls for African American teachers to teach students in the predominately white town. The superintendent states the purpose of the project is to show the students that African Americans, if given the same opportunity, are just as intelligent as their white counterparts.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Letter to Dr. King from Mrs. Beckler

Mrs. Beckler encloses five dollars in a support letter to Dr. King, wishing the best for his health and asking for an autographed copy of one of his books.

Plea for the Poor to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Signing as "A Poor Person," this author urges Dr. King to remember that poverty transcends race. The author requests that Dr. King help the poor of all races, with an emphasis on promoting voter registration for all poor people.

Letter from Gerald G. Fenn to MLK

In this letter, Geraldine Fenn described the many ventures that occurred the previous year. Her main focus was on 4-H and combining agriculture with race relations. She felt that by understanding and respecting people from different backgrounds, it could then lead to a collective of peace and love.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Roy Wilkins, the chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urges Dr. King to attend a special meeting in Washington, D.C. to plan a course of action on pending civil rights legislation.

Letter of Invite From Coval Bryant MacDonald to MLK

Thursday, March 24, 1966

In this letter, Minister Coval Bryant MacDonald invites Dr. King to speak with the minsters and priest of The Greater Oak Ministerial Association.

Martin Luther King....At Communist Training School

Monday, June 17, 1963

This advertisement printed in the Augusta Courier accuses Dr. King and several constituents of communist involvement.

Letter from Stanley Lavison to MLK Regarding Speeches

Thursday, March 17, 1966

In this letter to Dr. King, Stanley D. Levison references text books with Dr. King's speeches and The Chicago Rally.

Letter from MLK to A. K. Salz

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King thanks Mr. Salz for his financial contribution to the SCLC and explains that the contribution will help the SCLC continue its civil rights efforts.

John Locke

Dr. King records a quote from English political theorist John Locke on the development of the human mind.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Friday, February 11, 1966

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson that he cannot accept his invitation to Toronto due to his prior commitments for the month of June.

Telegram from Sen. Edward Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Senator and Mrs. Edward M. Kennedy congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Mrs. Weitzler to Bayard Rustin

Friday, January 26, 1968

Mrs. Weitzler assesses the meaning of the "March on Washington" and the impact it has had on her.

African American Unity in Atlanta, Georgia

The author of this document discusses why it is imperative for African Americans to not only stand in unity against the injustices of society, but to also be informed about the issues in which they strive to prevail against. Information about school integration, housing discrimination, and taxation is offered in the conclusion of the document.


Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Letter from Esther Davey to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

Esther Davey writes Dr. King in support of his crusade. She expresses her dismay in some of Dr. King's speeches made after the march from Selma, Alabama and stresses the importance of Christianity in his crusade.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, confirms a meeting with President Kennedy and Dr. King to discuss the Birmingham bombing incident.

Appeal to Community Business People

This document is a letter from the Greater Chicago Scavenger Association to Negro citizens. The letter informs the citizens of the beneficial affect that The Greater Chicago Scavenger Association can have on them and their community.

Can You Live Where You Want to Live?

George and Eunice Grier write regarding the topic "Can you live where you want to live?" This article discusses discrimination and segregation in housing. The Griers assert that integration in jobs and public places is advancing, but segregation in housing still plagues many people in America.

Letter from James H. Ridgely to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Attorney Ridgely requests that Dr. King sends his social security number in order for Addison H. Flournoy's federal estate tax return to be filed.

Letter from Samuel Bucholtz to MLK and Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, November 27, 1963

The Temple Israel of Hollywood sends a contribution to the SCLC and praises Wyatt Tee Walker for his appearance.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King quotes Bernard of Clairvaux on the character of the ideal Christian.

Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

Letter from MLK to Sara Mitchell

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Mitchell, a representative from the Atlanta Board of Education, for her recent letter acclaiming his book "Where Do We Go From Here." Dr. King states that the lack of material on Negro History and culture in America's public schools is "appalling" and children from all races will benefit from learning about another aspect of American culture and history.

Letter from Jack Egle to Reverend Martin Sargent

Tuesday, April 12, 1966

The European Director of the Council of Student Travel, Jack Egle, writes Martin Sargent addressing a statement made in the Herald Tribune regarding Dr. King's and Harry Belanfonte's opinions on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Rosemary O'Neill to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Rosemary O'Neill of the College of Saint Rose in Albany, New York writes Dr. King regarding Choice '68, the National Collegiate Presidential Primary. O'Neill, Choice '68 Campus Coordinator, requests campaign materials such as fliers, pamphlets and fact sheets to inform students on various candidates.

Prayer (Definition)

Dr. King quotes William James' definition of Prayer.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Friday, November 6, 1964

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Thursday, December 9, 1965

After hearing Dr. King's speech at Billanova University, Mr. Brownlow requests that the Reverend speak at the Haverford School located in Pennsylvania. Secondarily, Brownlow requests that Dr. King send a few words of congratulations to a student attending the college.