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Letter from Roland de Corneille to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Rev. Roland de Corneille of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK Requesting Support

Saturday, August 1, 1964

Dr. King sent this letter soliciting donations for the SCLC following the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He says there is gratifying compliance with desegregation in some areas and renewed defiance elsewhere. ?Responsibility is as important as militancy,? King writes, in challenging segregation and discrimination. The SCLC pledges both.

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Thursday, February 4, 1965

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

Summit Conference Program

Sunday, December 15, 1963

This program outlines the schedule and issues of concern to be addressed at the Summit Conference.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Randolph T. Blackwell

Friday, December 2, 1966

Harry Wachtel informs Randolph Blackwell that he's including $4,500 for the Southern Rural Action Project. The purpose of the project is to reduce the amount of poverty known to be prevalent in the south.

MLK Statement on Book by Salk

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. King writes a statement on a book by Jonas Salk and discusses the significance of his contribution. Dr. King expresses that Mr. Salk's book highlights one of the most damaging consequences of slavery in the eradication of the meaning, history, and identity of the Negro.

The 13th World Conference against A and H Bombs

Monday, July 31, 1967

The Japan Council against A(tom) and H(ydrogen) Bombs marks the subjects of discussion for their 13th World Conference. The purpose of the conference is to eliminate the usage of nuclear weaponry in U.S. aggression against Vietnam. The Council is also advocating for an end of the Vietnam War and reparations for those harmed by the use of nuclear weapons.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

Telegram from Mr. David Susskind to MLK

In this telegram, Mr. Susskind invites Dr. King to participate in a "'Open End' two hour debate with Governor George Wallace."

Letter from Harry Daniels to President Johnson

Sunday, December 25, 1966

Harry Daniels sends a copy of his letter to President Johnson to Dr. King, granting him permission to reprint it in his publications. In the letter, Daniels urges that in order to advance the freedom and equality of the United States, we must end poverty.

Letter from Bernard Edelman to MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Bernard Edelman, a former supporter of Dr. King and the SCLC, expresses his objection to Dr. King's stance on Vietnam.

Letter from Resident of Dade County, Florida to MLK

An anonymous writer requests Dr. King's assistance for youth in the Juvenile Court System of Dade County, Florida.

Letter From Martin Peretz to MLK

Tuesday, November 8, 1966

Martin Peretz asks Dr. King for an autograph while commending his courage in the struggle for justice and peace.

Nelson Rockefeller Telegram to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

In this telegram, New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller's secretary cancels his upcoming appointment with Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Sharon Brealer

Tuesday, July 27, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Sharon Brealer for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

God - II Kings

Dr. King cites II Kings 5:15 as as affirmation of monotheism.

Letter from Mrs. Uvee Mdodana-Arbouin to MLK

Friday, August 2, 1963

Mrs. Mdondana-Arbouin, President of the Women's Auxiliary of the Progressive Baptist National Convention, sends Dr. King the lyrics to the poem she delivered at their organization's recent dinner.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Tuesday, October 10, 1967

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

Letter from Annie Emehel to Dr. King

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

In this letter, Mrs. Annie Emehel wishes Dr. King success, in his upcoming trip to Nigeria. Dr. King was going to Nigeria to try to help the government and Biafra find a solution to their disagreements. Mrs. Emehel states that she has confidence that Dr. King will be able to help both sides come to a resolution.

Letters Between MLK and Max Dean

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Dr. King sends a letter out to supporters, updating them on the progress made through the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King also informs supporters that the work is far from done and asks for support. Writing on the back of Dr. King's letter, Max Dean informs Dr. King that his most important priority is an immediate and unconditional withdrawal from Vietnam. This is despite that Dean has "great respect" for Dr. King and the SCLC.

Letter from Rev. O. Tregelles Williams to MLK

Friday, February 10, 1967

Rev. Williams invites Dr. King to appear on a weekly BBC religious television program entitled "Meeting Point" during his visit to Wales in Great Britain.

Letter from Artist Sidney Gordon Budnick to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966

Sidney Gordon Budnick, architect and artist, gifts Dr. King with a piece of art work and applauds Dr. King's "efforts to bring to life the brotherhood of God and of man."

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale to MLK While in Jaill

Monday, October 24, 1960

Harry Van Asrdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council, informs Dr. King that the organization has voted to demand the release of Dr. King and others from Fulton County Jail. He states that the arrest violates "basic constitutional rights" and that the Council fully supports the fight to end discrimination and segregation in the United States.

Telegram from Harry G. Boyte to Rev. John Papandrew

Harry Boyte expresses his happiness that Rev. John Papandrew will be working with the SCLC.

Post Card from Critic to MLK

This unstamped post card comes from a writer who identifies himself as "Ole Dorky" and targets Dr. King and the American Civil Liberties Union as "Communist skum." The writer disagrees with the work of civil rights and believes that efforts are "making matters worse for negroes."

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Report

This report details a statistical count of Jewish communities being discriminated against according to a market research that was conducted by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

Transcript of MLK Appearance on WINS Radio

Sunday, May 31, 1964

This document is a 1964 transcript of a WINS Radio interview with Dr. King. The focus is the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from James E. Baine to MLK about Commentary

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

In this letter James Baine asks Dr. King about segregation and integrated for reference to be used in a college class.

Postcard Sent to MLK

This unsigned postcard sent from Memphis, Tennessee depicts Dr. King and Lyndon B. Johnson pulling down a judge who symbolizes justice.