The Archive

Moving to Another Mountain

Wesleyan University publishes an edited transcript of a speech given by Dr. King in 1964. The publication is made in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Telegram from Congressman Don Edwards to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

California Democratic Congressman Don Edwards congratulates Dr. King on his April 4th, 1967 speech "Beyond Vietnam," and commends his courage in speaking "so clearly on this vital question."

Letter from Manie Callahan to MLK

Sunday, January 13, 1963

Manie Callahan expresses her admiration to Dr. King and informs him of the passing of her parents which left her with a five bedroom apartment. Callahan understands the lack of opportunity for Negroes in the south and offers her home to a deserving married couple looking for work. She trusts Dr. King's judgment of character and hopes to hear from him soon.

Memorandum from Theodore E. Brown Regarding 1968 Trip to Nigeria

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Theodore E. Brown, the director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, reports the results of his recent trip to Nigeria to members of the Call Committee.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. James P. Dixon of Antioch College

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Dr. James Dixon to express Dr. King's joy in his ability to accept Dr. Dixon's invitation to speak at Antioch College's commencement.

John A. McDermott to MLK

Saturday, December 2, 1967

Mr. MacDermott informs Dr. King of the John F. Kennedy Award Dinner and requests that he wire his "greetings" to those who will be honoring him.

Letter from Dora Byron to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Dora Byron wrote this letter to Dr. King inviting him to participate in a television program at Emory University.

"Dr. King Outdated"

Saturday, July 15, 1967

This editorial reviews Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Under the heading "Dr. King Outdated." The review expresses Mr. Bob Smith's disagreement with many themes of the book.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

Letter from Brigitte Horburger to MLK

Brigitte Horburger sends Dr. King a photograph of a black child and white child playing the piano together. Under the photograph it states, "To produce real harmony you must play both the black and white keys."

American Labor Problems

In an assessment of American labor,Dr. King poses the question, "are we as concerned for human values and human resources as we are for material and mechanical values?" Furthermore, he declares the necessity of legislative, political, and social action to rectify such failings of American society.

Letter from Floyd Mulkey to MLK

Saturday, December 16, 1967

Floyd Mulkey writes Dr. King a letter, commending him on his plans for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to Reverend Allen L. Johnson

Monday, April 12, 1965

Chauncey Eskridge informs Reverend Johnson that he has sought information from Jack H. Young and R. Jess Brown regarding the posting of bond money.

MLK Makes Request About Bill Stein

Monday, November 21, 1966

Dr. King requests that the Protestant Episcopal Church of New York allow Bill Stein to continue his work with SCLC programs.

Letter of Support from New Jersey Resident

Monday, April 10, 1967

Writing a third party, the author of this letter voices his support for Dr. King and his views on the Vietnam war.

News Clipping Pertaining to Job Corp March

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

The article references a series of hostile altercations between the trainees at a local Job Corps and the residents of Battle Creek.

Telegram from Gitta Gossmann to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Gossmann sends Dr. King a royalty check for his book "Why We Can't Wait" in the amount of $3,448.76.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

Letter from Congressman James Roosevelt to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Representative James Roosevelt thanks Dr. King for his words regarding Roosevelt's contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Essay on Walter Rauschenbusch

This essay exams Walter Rauschenbushch views on the relationship between the Church and Society.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Contracts

Friday, January 29, 1965

In this letter Joan Daves requests from Ms. McDonald the required signatures from Dr. King for the contract for the Oriya-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait," which is to be published in India.

Letter from MLK Requesting Support

Saturday, August 1, 1964

Dr. King sent this letter soliciting donations for the SCLC following the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He says there is gratifying compliance with desegregation in some areas and renewed defiance elsewhere. ?Responsibility is as important as militancy,? King writes, in challenging segregation and discrimination. The SCLC pledges both.

St. Augustine, Florida: 400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

The SCLC compiled and published this pamphlet about St. Augustine, Florida, describing a long history of racial discrimination and segregation supported by Northern tourism.

Letter from Ann Thompson to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Ann Thompson, a white woman, writes Dr. King expressing support and thanks for his recent speech on peace. Thompson states that Dr. King is one of the few great men living.

Support from Gardner Taylor to MLK

Mr. Taylor expresses his disappointment in the City of Atlanta's decision to arrest Dr. King along with 14 other individuals.

Letter from Charley Brown to MLK about Wallace Administration

Tuesday, November 1, 1966

In this letter Charley Brown suggests to Dr. King the idea of endorsing Mrs. Wallace for governor of Alabama, arguing that this would actually lose Mr. Wallace a number of votes.

Letter from Mrs. Edna E. Williams to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

Mrs. Edna E. Williams invites Dr. King to attend The Friendship Baptist Church's annual Harry W. Knight Award and Mortgage Retirement Fund Banquet.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Baruch Spinoza's "Epistle 21" to Henry Oldenburg.

Letter from Trude B. Feldman to Mrs. King

In this letter Trude Feldman sends Mrs. King a copy of a "piece" on Sammy Davis from "Ebony" and asks that it be returned after review.

Letter From Philip S. Riggs to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, Philip Riggs writes to express his difference of opinion with Dr. King regarding the treatment of House Representative Adam Clayton Powell.