Themes

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Note Cards

Education was essential in the development of the mind of Martin Luther King, Jr. From his matriculation at Morehouse College through his doctoral studies at Boston University, Dr. King took notes on various subjects and referenced some of the most important philosophers of all time. The note cards shown in this section give you a glimpse into the molding of one of the world’s most brilliant thinkers and orators. Religion, natural law, metaphysics and the meaning of wisdom are just a few of the topics highlighted. These subjects and many more helped Dr. King’s capacity to expand his intellectual and spiritual capacity three dimensionally.

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Celsus

Dr. King writes about Celsus, a second century Greek philosopher who opposed Christianity.

Brunner & Niebuhr

Dr. King relates Swiss theologian Emil Brunner to American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, in that they both argue that reason is for adjusting to the material world, and faith is for dealing with God.

Suffering (Psalms)

Dr. King references the biblical Book of Psalms regarding the topic of suffering.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

Emotionalism in Religion

Dr. King records a quote from a book entitled "The Gift of Tongues, A Study in the Pathological Aspects of Christianity".

Christianity

Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.

Ethical Relativism

Dr. King outlines an unknown author's views on ethical relativism.

Mysticism

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as an able defense on mysticism.

Religion (Ritschl)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Religion

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking’s “The Meaning of God in Human Experience.”

Peter Lombard

Dr. King outlines biographical information regarding theologian Peter Lombard.

Epicureanism

Dr. King documents a passage from William De Witt Hyde's "Five Great Philosophers of Life" on Epicureanism. The passage outlines Epicurus' view on pleasure and the impersonal nature of the world.

The Sickness of our Society

Dr. King describes three points that he claims as symptoms of the "Sickness of Our Society." These points include a suicide rate of one every twenty-seven minutes, more than half a million Americans in mental hospitals and three-quarters of a million with alcohol problems.

Catholicism

Dr. King documents some insights regarding the history of the Roman Catholic church.

God

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."

Funeral

Dr. King quotes Shakespeare's "Hamlet."

Jeremiah

In this series of ten notecards, Dr. King breaks down the Book of Jeremiah into mutiple sections, including chapters and versus regarding Good, knowledge, sin, and forgiveness.

The New Covenant

Dr. King writes about the New Covenant, according to Jeremiah 31:33.

Leibnitz's Doctrine of Evil

Dr. King cites Albert C. Knudson's "Doctrine of Redemption."

Erasmus

Dr. King writes about Erasmus, a Dutch scholar, who lived during the Reformation period.

History

Dr. King references a quote from St. Paul regarding a theological perspective of history.

Social Ethics

Dr. King refers to Micah 3:9-12, saying the prophet condemns the love of money of civil and religious leaders. King wonders whether religious leaders today should be paid for their work and concludes that money should never be a priority over service.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King writes notes on perceiving God using Nelson Henry Wieman's text, "The Source of Human God."

Calvinism

Dr. King writes on the concept of Calvinism.

Religion (Its Inescapableness)

Dr. King quotes Nels F. S. Ferre's "Faith and Reason" on religion as the "inescapable" bind between us and the universe.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King discusses the concept of religious fundamentalism as it relates to the Christian faith.

Christianity

Dr. King finds agreement with Celsus, an opponent of Christianity, in a quote on the root of the Christian faith.

Knowing God (Wieman)

Dr. King notes Henry Nelson Wieman's ideas on how man comes to know God.

Freedom

Dr. King summarizes theologian Reinhold Niebuhr and his conceptualization of "Freedom."

Aristotle

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Aristotelian philosophy.