Themes

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Note Cards

Education was essential in the development of the mind of Martin Luther King, Jr. From his matriculation at Morehouse College through his doctoral studies at Boston University, Dr. King took notes on various subjects and referenced some of the most important philosophers of all time. The note cards shown in this section give you a glimpse into the molding of one of the world’s most brilliant thinkers and orators. Religion, natural law, metaphysics and the meaning of wisdom are just a few of the topics highlighted. These subjects and many more helped Dr. King’s capacity to expand his intellectual and spiritual capacity three dimensionally.

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God (His Existence)

Change title to conform to Dr. King’s filing system.

Knudson, Albert C.

Dr. King cites a work by Christian theologian, Albert Knudson.

Peace of Mind

Dr. King quotes Marcus Aurelius about peace of mind.

Method of Ex Abstraction

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosopher Alfred Whitehead's theory of extensive abstraction.

Aquinas, Thomas

Dr. King notes biographical information about Thomas Aquinas.

God (His Love)

Dr. King writes notes regarding God and his love for humanity. King states, "God is a God who takes initiative... [He] seeks His creatures before they seek him."

Category Time

Dr. King outlines Paul Tillich's view on time.

Patripassianism

Dr. King gives a definition of patripassianism.

Sin

Dr. King references Dewey and his view of evil.

Man, a Being of Becoming

Dr. King documents ideas regarding the philosophy of man. Using the metaphor of a "flowing stream," he addresses man's experience from infancy through adulthood.

Man

Dr. King quotes Pascal's "Pensees" in this excerpt that focuses on man's greatness.

The Scope of Philosophy

Dr. King notes that Alfred North Whitehead, in “Concept of Nature,” “Religion in the Making” and “Principles of Natural Knowledge,” seeks to isolate the philosophy of science from metaphysics.

Augustine's Theory of Knowledge

Dr. King discusses St. Augustine's Theory of Knowledge. According to Augustine, "sense knowledge is the lowest level of knowledge."

God

Dr. King wrote these notes on the concept of God while reading "Science and the Modern World" and "Religion in the Making" by Alfred North Whitehead. He quotes Whitehead, stating that God is the "perpetual vision of the road which leads to the deeper realities."

Erasmus

Dr. King writes about Erasmus, a Dutch scholar, who lived during the Reformation period.

God

Dr. King expresses the power of God as being infinite beyond comprehension of man.

Angels

Dr. King writes on angels, according to Daniel 10:13, 21, and 12:1.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

God

Dr. King describes Psalms 135:5 as henotheism: belief in a god without denying the existence of other gods. Because God is the only one worthy of worship, King concludes that the Hebrews were practical monotheists.

Esther

Dr. King discusses the religious and moral teachings in the biblical book of Esther.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Robert Browning's "Paracelsus."

Man

Dr. King writes his thoughts on man.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King summarizes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "Can God Be Perceived" that appeared in The Journal of Religion (1943).

Hocking's Philosophy of the Human Self

Dr. King cites the journal "The Personalist" on William Ernest Hocking's philosophy of the human self.

Capitalism

Dr. King illustrates a relationship between capitalism and anarchism.

God

Dr. King records his thoughts on the book of Deuteronomy to illustrate the oneness of God.

Man

Dr. King quotes Jonathan Swift’s scathing assessment of man.

The Servant of Jehovah

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 41:1-6 seems to describe the servant of the Lord as the personification of Israel, whose task is to bring peace and prosperity to Israel and knowledge of Him to the entire world.

Knowledge

Dr. King references a biblical scripture regarding the topic knowledge.