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Note Cards

Education was essential in the development of the mind of Martin Luther King, Jr. From his matriculation at Morehouse College through his doctoral studies at Boston University, Dr. King took notes on various subjects and referenced some of the most important philosophers of all time. The note cards shown in this section give you a glimpse into the molding of one of the world’s most brilliant thinkers and orators. Religion, natural law, metaphysics and the meaning of wisdom are just a few of the topics highlighted. These subjects and many more helped Dr. King’s capacity to expand his intellectual and spiritual capacity three dimensionally.

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Barth

Dr. King writes about Karl Barth's theology regarding revelation.

1922 Work

Dr. King identifies different philosophical points of Alfred North Whitehead's 1922 publication, titled "The Principle of Relativity with Applications to Physical Science."

God (His Omnipotence)

Dr. King defines omnipotence as meaning that God has the power to carry out His will. He notes that God must hold characteristics of both good and evil and states that few philosophers have acknowledged God's omnipotence.

Jainism

Dr. King notes a quote regarding the philosophy of Jainism.

Style

Dr. King references Voltaire and his views regarding the impact of the style in which one chooses to express himself.

Mysticism

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as an able defense on mysticism.

Schleiermacher (Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers" on religion as something experienced.

Existentialism

Dr. King outlines concepts of existentialism as viewed through the doctrine of French existentialist writer Jean Paul Sartre.

Paint

Noting the vastness of the sky and "heavens," Dr. King comments on the Earth, stars, and surrounding planets.

Suffering

Dr. King quotes and comments on Shakespeare's "Henry V."

Predestination

Dr. King defines predestination.

Worship

Dr. King references William Ernest Hocking and James Bissett Pratt regarding religious worship.

Worship

Dr. King critiques the Protestant Church worship services.

Religion (Its Inescapableness)

Dr. King quotes Nels F. S. Ferre's "Faith and Reason" on religion as the "inescapable" bind between us and the universe.

Man (A Fatalistic View)

Dr. King includes a quote from the Persian philosopher Omar Khayyam.

Nationalism

Dr. King cites a biblical scripture from the book of Isaiah where it is asserted that "God's house is to be a house of prayer for all people."

Sin

Dr. King quotes two verses from the book of Leviticus.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites a scripture that deals with the topic of social ethics.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Exodus in reference to "the idea of a primitive anthropomorphic God."

Ritschl and Schleiermacher

Dr. King compares the thoughts of German theologian's Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Church, Negro

Dr. King provides insight on the interaction between the church and the Negro youth.

Mysticism

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking’s “The Meaning of God in Human Experience.”

Prevenient Grace

Dr. King defines prevenient grace, identifying it as Augustine’s view.

Christianity

Dr. King writes about the concept of Christianity.

Quasi Positivism

Dr. King outlines philosopher Alfred North Whitehead's views on the relationship between metaphysics and the philosophy of science. Referencing Whitehead's work "The Concept of Nature," this note card contains a quote from the original text and also paraphrases Whitehead's writings.

Original Sin

Dr. King writes a definition of original sin.

Numbers

Dr. King records class notes from the biblical Book of Numbers regarding ethics, knowledge, and sin.

DeWolf, Harold

Dr. King references Harold DeWolf's book, "A Theology of the Living Church."

Judgment

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the "day of the Lord." According to Amos, this would be a day of judgment, opposed to a day of national exaltation.