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Note Cards

Education was essential in the development of the mind of Martin Luther King, Jr. From his matriculation at Morehouse College through his doctoral studies at Boston University, Dr. King took notes on various subjects and referenced some of the most important philosophers of all time. The note cards shown in this section give you a glimpse into the molding of one of the world’s most brilliant thinkers and orators. Religion, natural law, metaphysics and the meaning of wisdom are just a few of the topics highlighted. These subjects and many more helped Dr. King’s capacity to expand his intellectual and spiritual capacity three dimensionally.

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War

Citing two sources concerning war, Dr. King notes the opinions of Dr. Charles W. Mayo and John M. Fletcher. Dr. Mayo believes that it is impossible to abolish war, as "war is part of our human inheritance," while Fletcher takes the opposite view in his book "Human Nature and World Peace."

Immortality

Dr. King quotes Alfred Tennyson on the topic of immortality.

Anxiety

Dr. King distinguishes anxiety from fear, noting that fear is directed toward things, while anxiety is directed toward nothingness.

Faith In The Heart

Dr. King uses the steadfast faith of biblical figures Abraham and Paul to express his desire to part from the traditionalism of religion and make it applicable to all aspects of a person's life. King also iterates this position by using excerpts from various philosophers such as Edgar Brightman and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Suffering

Dr. King questions whether the statement in Proverbs 11:23 that the righteous are rewarded with goodness and the wicked wrath is always true.

Plato's Psychology

Dr. King outlines Plato’s psychology.

Resurrection of Jesus

Dr. King writes about John Mansfield's play entitled "The Trial of Jesus."

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

Formative Elements

From Alfred North Whitehead's "Religion in the Making," Dr. King records the formative elements of the temporal world.

Typical Theistic Personalism

Dr. King sketches notes on theistic personalism with references to Friedrich Leibniz, George Berkeley, Immanuel Kant, and Hermann Lotze.

Paint

Noting the vastness of the sky and "heavens," Dr. King comments on the Earth, stars, and surrounding planets.

God

Dr. King records a portion of Carl Jung's argument that God is a function of the unconscious.

Spurrier, William A.

Dr. King cites William Spurrier's "Guide to the Christian Faith."

Atheism

Dr. King ponders atheism by quoting a short anecdote of L.P. Jacks' shoemaker.

Treitschke

Dr. King references Heinrich von Treitschke, a German historian and political writer, regarding the responsibilities of the state.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 31: 29, 30.

Personality

Dr. King cites a quote from J. M. E. McTaggart's understanding of personality from "Studies in Hegelian Cosmology."

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Barth, Karl

Dr. King comments on Karl Barth's view that Christ assumed fallen human nature.

Trinity

Dr. King quotes a sermon by Bernard of Clairvaux

Philosophy of Life (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes G. K. Chesterton’s “Heretics.”

Tests of Great Music

Dr. King lists five criteria to use to evaluate whether a piece of music is great. Great music should hold its appeal over time, connect different experiences, foster a deeper life experience, unify history and integrate the individual personality.

Monophysitism

EGYPT, SYRIA, ARMENIA

Dr. King distinguishes between monophysitism and the Chalcedonian Creed, which recognizes two natures in Christ.

Fichte on God

Dr. King references Kantian protege Johann Gottlieb Fichte and philosophically defines God as the "moral order of the universe."

Social Ethics

Dr. King's references a chapter and verse from the biblical Book of Zephaniah. He notes that the passages concerning social phenomena such as infidelity, pride, selfishness and oppression are still "entirely up to date."

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."

The Trinity

Dr. King provides the historical origin and ideology of the Trinity.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Nels F. S. Ferre's "Faith and Reason."

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

A. N. Whitehead

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's view of the philosophy of science in The Concept of Nature.