Themes

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Ethics (A Criticism of Philosophical Ethics)

Dr. King references Emil Brunner’s "The Divine Imperative: A Study in Christian Ethics."

Calvinism

Dr. King writes on the concept of Calvinism.

Hell (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Nikolai Berdyaev on the concept of hell.

Nationalism

Dr. King quotes Charles Summer, stating that being "children of a common Father" is a "more sacred bond" than being a citizen.

God (His Love)

Dr. King writes notes regarding God and his love for humanity. King states, "God is a God who takes initiative... [He] seeks His creatures before they seek him."

I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

Omnipotence

Dr. King quotes James Ward's "The Realm of Ends."

Trinitarianism

Dr. King discusses the doctrine trinitarianism, the belief that God is one being, existing in three equal persons.

Sin

Dr. King explains the relationship between punishment and sin by referencing the biblical verse, I Chronicles 21:17.

Sin

Dr. King references the biblical book of Numbers regarding the topic of sin.

Copernicus

Dr. King discusses how the discoveries of renowned astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus and German philosopher Immanuel Kant revolutionized thinking regarding the human mind. The note card also outlines philosophical views originating from the "analogy of two clocks" referencing prominent thinkers Rene Descartes and Gottfried Leibniz.

Death

Dr. King writes on the "empty feeling" of death, citing St. Augustine's autobiographical book, "Confessions." This index card contains a quote from the work in which the philosopher reflects on the death of his closest friend.

Fichte on God

Dr. King references Kantian protege Johann Gottlieb Fichte and philosophically defines God as the "moral order of the universe."

Man

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man,” noting that modern culture has come to understand more of nature and less of man.

Aristotle in Thomas

Dr. King outlines aspects of St. Thomas Aquinas' philosophy, which are structurally Aristotelian. Points he discusses include similarities between the two philosophers' ontology and epistemology, while also outlining a point of divergence in Aquinas' view of God as an "efficient cause."

Conscience

Dr. King ponders the meaning of the word 'conscience.' He questions the nature of conscience and ultimately sees it as a necessary sense of obligation that makes a difference in the life of a civilization.

Schleiermacher (What Is the Operation of Grace)

Dr. King records a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher's work "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Death

Dr. King documents a quote from Pascal regarding "Death."

Descartes

Dr. King quotes Rene Descartes' discovery of his famous principle. The idea, "I think, therefore I am," Descartes says, is essential, irrefutable and fitting to be the first principle of his philosophy.

Education (Its Weakness in the Moral Realm)

Dr. King documents two quotes from St. Augustine's "Confessions." Both quotes address Augustine's view on education and how it affects one's relationship with God and other human beings.

Moral Law

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman on the principle of moral law.

Death

Dr. King records some notes on death.

Servetus, Michael

SPAIN, Geneva, Switzerland

Dr. King writes biographical notes about Michael Servetus, a citizen of Spain known for his study of medicine and theology. Servetus was burned at the stake because of his anti-Trinitarian views.

Immortality

"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Freedom

Dr. King elaborates on the ideas of Paul Tillich regarding the doctrine of freedom. Mr. Tillich details the affirmation of determinism capabilities and the function of "will."

Sin

Dr. King compares the understanding of several philosophers on the subject of sin.

God

Dr. King expounds on points made about the idea of "God," by Immanuel Kant, William James, and W.E. Hocking.

God - II Kings

Dr. King cites II Kings 5:15 as as affirmation of monotheism.

Anselm's Theory

Dr. King discusses Catholic theology referencing the theories of Aquinas and Anselm regarding the topic of "sin."

History

Dr. King cites Reinhold Niebuhr's definition of history and its relation to God.