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Wycliffites: Followers of John Wycliffe

Dr. King writes on the ideas of English philosopher John Wycliffe's followers, "Wycliffites."


Dr. King records geologist Robert Gheyselinck’s observation about the brevity of human history in relation to the earth’s history


This document is a notecard titled "Religion," in which Dr. King expounds on John Dewey's definition of religion in "A Common Faith" as a "purely ethical meaning" of religion.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy and expresses that "the death penalty is applied to anyone who steals from his brother or carries him away in slavery."


Dr. King interprets Psalm 90, which he explains discusses the transience of man as compared to God.


Dr. King quotes a passage regarding worship, from Samuel Arthur Devan's "Ascent to Zion."

Education (Its Weakness in the Moral Realm)

Dr. King documents two quotes from St. Augustine's "Confessions." Both quotes address Augustine's view on education and how it affects one's relationship with God and other human beings.

History: Ecclesiastes

Dr. King examines the "author's philosophy of history" recorded in the biblical text Ecclesiastes 1:9. He notes that Ecclesiastes' view of history as "a series of endless cycles which has no underlying theology" is in stark contrast to general Bible philosophy, and is more in line with a Greek view of history.


Dr. King cites the reference in Isaiah 6:2 to a seraphim, likely "a winged human figure."


Dr. King quotes Friedrich Engles as he clarifies that Karl "Marx was not an economic determinist as many have thought." The economic situation and superstructure of society are noted as key elements.


Dr. King notes that Jeremiah 9:23 speaks of man's ability to know and understand God in contrast to modern theology's claim that God is beyond knowing.


Dr. King writes notes about the views of philosopher Anaximenes on the universe, comparing them to those of Thales and Anaximander.


Dr. King quotes philosopher John Fiske regarding the topic of immortality.

Augustine's Theory of Knowledge

Dr. King discusses St. Augustine's Theory of Knowledge. According to Augustine, "sense knowledge is the lowest level of knowledge."


Dr. King describes the challenge of the Protestant Church as finding a balance between objective and subjective worship.

Zwingli, H.

Dr. King records biographical information about Swiss reformer Ulrich (or Huldrych) Zwingli.


Dr. King notes William James' view of metaphysics.


Dr. King defines worship.

Schleiermacher, Friedrich

Dr. King outlines the life and ideologies of Friedrich Schleiermacher.


Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Judaism according to Pope Pius XII.

God Nature

Dr. King sketches his thoughts on Saint Thomas Aquinas' "investigation of God's nature."


Dr. King notes Swiss theologian Karl Barth's favorite expression on revelation.


Dr. King writes about an unknown author's view of pantheism.


Dr. King quotes from Browning's "A Death in the Desert."

Man, a Being of Becoming

Dr. King documents ideas regarding the philosophy of man. Using the metaphor of a "flowing stream," he addresses man's experience from infancy through adulthood.


Dr. King notes some attributes and results of worship.

Man The Christian View

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr’s three ways in which the Christian view of man differs from all others, citing “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”


Dr. King outlines epistemological claims that deal with the "universals" and the "particulars" of knowledge. In doing so, he references the philosophical views of Socrates and St. Thomas Aquinas.


Dr. King cites Albert Knudson’s “The Philosophy of Personalism” as a good defense.

Aristotle in Thomas

Dr. King outlines aspects of St. Thomas Aquinas' philosophy, which are structurally Aristotelian. Points he discusses include similarities between the two philosophers' ontology and epistemology, while also outlining a point of divergence in Aquinas' view of God as an "efficient cause."