Themes

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Messianic Hope

Dr. King writes these notes on "Messianic Hope" from Isaiah 11:6 and 11:8. He quotes Ludwig Feuerbach, a German philosopher, from his work "The Essence of Religion."

MLK Note Card - Schleiermacher, Theology and God-consciousness

The person to whom Dr. King is referring is the German philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher.

Metaphysics

Dr. King quotes William James' perception of metaphysics.

Pride

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine and C. S. Lewis on pride.

Symbols

Dr. King discusses the "ontological structure of self" and its relation to symbols.

Marcian

Dr. King highlights biographical information on Marcian, a second-century reformer.

Periods of Greek Literature

Dr. King provides brief notes on three periods of Greek literature.

Immortality

Dr. King writes a quote from Goethe from Johann Peter Eckermann's "Conversations of Goethe."

Judgment

ISRAEL

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the "day of the Lord." According to Amos, this would be a day of judgment, opposed to a day of national exaltation.

America

New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's view in "The Irony of American History" that "the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

God

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosophy, God, and the world. King quotes Dr. Shirley Guthrie, "It is the Lord; let him do what seemeth Him good."

Death

Dr. King documents a quote from Pascal regarding "Death."

Money

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Principles of Christian Ethics."

William James

Dr. King briefly discusses philosopher William James and his lectures entitled "The Variety of Religious Experience."

Man

SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King quotes Nobel Literature Prize winner William Faulkner on the prospects for man.

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Knowledge)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Evil

Dr. King outlines his views on evil and categorizes it into three types.

Sin

Dr. King outlines some insights regarding moral duty and sin.

Scientific Method (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s article “Authority and the Normative Approach” in the Journal of Religion for a definition of the scientific method. He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Judaism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Joseph Klausner's book "From Jesus to Paul" regarding Judaism. Joseph Klausner was a Jewish historian.

Worship (Definition)

Dr. King defines worship as contemplation on the whole of existence.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Leslie Dixon Weatherhead’s “Why Do Men Suffer?”

Worship

Dr. King quotes a passage regarding worship, from Samuel Arthur Devan's "Ascent to Zion."

Faith In The Heart

Dr. King uses the steadfast faith of biblical figures Abraham and Paul to express his desire to part from the traditionalism of religion and make it applicable to all aspects of a person's life. King also iterates this position by using excerpts from various philosophers such as Edgar Brightman and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Schleiermacher (What Is the Operation of Grace)

Dr. King records a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher's work "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Notecard Regarding Semi-Pelagianism

Dr. King writes notes regarding Semi-Pelagianism, which is "a movement in Christian theology which attempted to find a middle ground between the extreme doctrine of total depravity and predestination."

Method of Ex Abstraction

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosopher Alfred Whitehead's theory of extensive abstraction.

Monism

Dr. King cites the many ways in which the concept of Monism is applied.

Evil (Natural)

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson on the topic of evil.

Anaximander

GREECE

Dr. King documents background information on Greek philosopher Anaximander. Over five note cards, he outlines key principles of Anaximander's philosophy under the subject titles "Metaphysics" and "His Views on Biology."