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Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

William Kivi references a statement made by Dr. King at the SCLC convention pertaining to everyone having a "guaranteed income." Kivi's belief is that Republican officials in the state of California continue to chisel away at federal programs designed to give the poor access to health care and other government aid. His recommendation to Dr. King as a solution would be a "restructured national civil service."

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Mathias of Maryland thanks Dr. King for his recent letter urging him to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. Although Mathias' vote against the seating was defeated, he states that the mere challenge to it "has drawn once again the attention of the American public to this unfortunate situation."

Letter from A. Dale Fiers to MLK

Saturday, January 15, 1966
Indiana (IN), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Texas (TX), Dallas, TX

A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary for the International Convention of Christian Churches, informs Dr. King of the order of events to take place at the Dallas Assembly of the International Convention on September 25, 1966.


Dr. King quotes a sermon by Bernard of Clairvaux

National Citizens' Commission Report to Congress

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Urban Development Coordinator Shelby Southard, of the Cooperative League of the USA, sends Dr. King a copy of this report to Congress recommending improved foreign aid for urban development. Southard helped author the report, entitled the "National Citizens' Commission on Urban Development." It emphasizes unrest caused by "deplorable social conditions" in cities around the world, and seeks to improve urban development planning.

Progress in Race Relations

In this outline for a speech, Dr. King emphasizes the need for continued work in the area of race relations. He argues that it is necessary to abolish segregation for democracy to live.

People in Action: Most Abused Man in Nation

Saturday, March 31, 1962
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

This article by Dr. King, published in his "People in Action" series in the New York Amsterdam News, describes the national and local reaction to the Birmingham jailing of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and J. S. Phifer.

Letter from Representative Carl Perkins to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Kentucky (KY), Washington, D.C.

Congressman Carl Perkins informs Dr. King that he supports fighting against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
New York, NY

This royalty statement reflects the amount earned for the Japanese edition of "Stride Toward Freedom".


Dr. King outlines some thoughts on the effect Jesus' life had on his followers.

Letter from James Hershey to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Joe T. Denman writes Dr. King on behalf of the Citizens For Progress Organization hoping to sponsor a speaking date in Yakima, Washington. Denman requests that the Reverend forward the date that he will arrive.

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
Nashville, TN

H.D. Bollinger is honored to have Dr. King as a speaker for their Eighth Quadrennial Methodist Student Movement Conference at the Municipal Auditorium. Mr. Bollinger communicates with Dora McDonald the details of Dr. King's trip. He also informs her that they will cover the travel expenses for Dr. King's assistant and have received the items he requested. In an additional letter a month later, the director of the conference notifies Miss McDonald that they are in need of five additional photographs and the address of Dr. King.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, November 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

SCLC Chairman Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to join other civil rights leaders in honoring President John F. Kennedy, as the they seek to promote the idea of civil rights.

Letter from William Kunstler to Arthur Shores

Friday, March 9, 1962
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL

Attorney William Kunstler writes to Arthur Shores about a legal case involving Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth.

Redwood City, CA Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 1967
Berkeley, CA, Pennsylvania (PA)

At the bottom of this clipping, from the Redwood City, California Tribune, is a brief update on the release of Dr. King's final book. The book entitled: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", according to the tribune, anticipated that it would be a very must-read publication.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to MLK

Monday, April 19, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Annalee Stewart, Legislative and Branch Liaison for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, invites Dr. King to speak at the organization's fiftieth anniversary banquet. She provides a historic backdrop for the organization and explains its current focus on "Peace, Freedom and Bread."

Gift from the Jersey City Chapter of the American Jewish Congress to MLK

New Jersey (NJ)

The Jersey City Chapter of the Women's Division of the American Jewish Congress made a donation to the Louise Waterman Wise Youth Center in Jerusalem in Dr. King's name. They sent him this note, wishing him a very speedy recovery and good luck.

Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Dr. Brightman's views on philosophy . This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Charles H. Dorr

Friday, January 5, 1968
Wisconsin (WI), New York (NY), SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King writes Charles Dorr acknowledging his support of the young African American men who are boycotting the Olympic games. King states, "the country must concern itself with the plight of all Negroes and not just the privileged few."

Letter from Bible Student to MLK


The bible student who wrote this letter used biblical references to justify segregation and to persuade Dr. King to cease civil rights demonstrations.

Philosopher (definition)

Dr. King quotes poet William Wordsworth's definition of a philosopher.

Letter from Zelma Dodd to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM

Zelma Dodd sends Dr. King her best wishes along with two poems entitled, "The Soul of a Black Man," and "A Negro Soldier."

Request For Meeting Telegram From Dr. King To Mayor Daley of Chicago

Sunday, March 13, 1966
Chicago, IL

This telegram dated March 14, 1966, was sent to Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley of Chicago from Dr. King. Dr. King asks the Mayor if he can meet with him in city hall, along with other religious leaders. He wants to discuss with the Mayor about considering programs to eliminate slums,expand health services, and to improve employment and job training opportunities for the people of Chicago.

Black Power and Liberation: A Communist View

New York (NY), New York, NY

Arnold Johnson, Public Relations Director of Communist Party U. S. A, requests commentary on Claude Lightfoot's pamphlet "A Note on Black Power and Liberation." The pamphlet has sparked discussions in the public press and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Letter from Carey B. Preston to MLK

Friday, August 28, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL

Carey Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, thanks Dr. King for being the public meeting speaker at their convention.

Letter from MLK to Robert F. Kennedy

Monday, October 14, 1963

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that if the proposed Civil Rights Bill of 1964 is "weakened at any point" that civil disobedience will follow and it will be the fault of those that "watered down the bill."

Sincerity and Intelligence

Dr. King reviews the Christian teaching of sincerity and its relationship to intelligence. Referencing Judaistic history and a biblical story involving the Apostle Paul, he comments that sincerity alone is lacking. He insists that Christians must infuse their sincerity with intelligence in order to "solve the spiritual problems of the world."

Telegram from Congressman Charles E. Bennett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Florida Democratic Congressman Charles Bennett informs Dr. King that the Celler Bill does not apply to all states, though he feels that it should. The Celler Bill, introduced by New York Democratic Congressman Emmanuel Celler, would prohibit the purchase of rifles, shotguns and handguns by direct mail.

"One Solitary Life"

The document, shown here, contains a narrative describing Jesus, entitled "One Solitary Life." Dr. King would use this narrative, in one of his last and most famous sermons "The Drum Major Instinct." The sermon was delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968, exactly two months before his untimely assassination.

Letter from Thomas N. Schroth to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Thomas N. Schroth, from the Congressional Quaterly Service, extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the National Press Club.