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"ALGERIA"

Moral Law

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman on the principle of moral law.

Letter to Dora McDonald from F. Fishman

Friday, October 27, 1967

This document is a correspondence between Mr. Frank Fishman and Miss. Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary. Mr. Fishman had enclosed a copy of a letter dated July 25 and his letter September 25, enquiring that he did not receive a reply about his script that was sent back July 25, 1967.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gulliace

Dr. King writes Mr. Gulliace thanking him for requesting him to comment on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life after Death." However, due to Dr. King's busy schedule with the Movement and ministry, he cannot commit the time to assist Mr. Gulliace.

Letter from Elmer A. Rovang to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Elmer Rovang expresses disdain for Dr. King's views on foreign policy and space exploration. Rovang even threatens to vote for George Wallace as President in order to counter Dr. King's "destructive" ideology.

The Christian Way of Life in Human Relations

Wednesday, December 4, 1957

Dr. King makes a speech to the National Council of Churches regarding the issue of American race relations. After school integration ... has noticed a radical change in the attitudes of African-Americans, ultimately giving birth to this mental and figurative notion of the "new Negro". He solicits the assistance and leadership of the nation's churches to take a firm stand against the rampant inequalities afflicting blacks are facing in America.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

Pilgrimage to Nonviolence

Dr. King's essay "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" provides a replete account of the thinkers, ideas and sentiments responsible for his pledge to nonviolence.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

Freedom

Here, Dr. King defines freedom.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Jespersen Og Pios Forlag has made an offer for the Danish language rights to "Strength To Love." Enclosed are agreements signed by Jespersen Og Pios Forlag.

Letter from Joan Daves to Andrew Young

Friday, April 21, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Daves focuses on Dr. King's speeches and discusses copyrighting issues.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, suggests a discussion concerning future writing plans. She mentions the possibility of publishing a collection that would include several of Dr. King's speeches and writings, among them the March on Washington address and the Oslo speech.

Telegram from Harry G. Boyte to Rev. John Papandrew

Harry Boyte expresses his happiness that Rev. John Papandrew will be working with the SCLC.

Letter from Charles Sherrod to Friends of SNCC

Saturday, July 22, 1961

Field Secretary Charles Sherrod invites friends of the SNCC to an emergency meeting to outline the direction of the student and Civil Rights Movement. The meeting is to be held at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee which serves as a training ground for nonviolence and civil rights activities.

MLK Statement in Support of Labor Union

Thursday, June 11, 1959

This 1959 statement on behalf of the United Packing House Workers Union is one of many Dr. King wrote supporting unions and the Labor Movement.

Letter from Jesse L. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 31, 1967

Jesse Jackson writes Dr. King in reference to the efforts of Operation Breadbasket and its fundraising successes. He also expresses to Dr. King the importance of the Support A Worker (SAW) program and encloses information regarding its development.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Telegrams from MLK to the Kennedys

Dr. King informs President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the bombings and police behavior in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King suggests that if desegregation does not occur the city will experience a "racial holocaust."

Letter from Margaret Horack to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968

The Student Government of Salve Regina College requests campaign materials from Dr. King for its participation in "Choice 68," a mock national collegiate presidential primary.

Letter from Kenneth Pierce to MLK

Kenneth Pierce was recently released from Fulton County jail and informs Dr. King that he would like to speak to him about an "important situation." Mr. Pierce also references another cellmate who would like to communicate to Dr. King or one of his representatives as well.

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Eugene Cook, Attorney General of Georgia, writes to Mr. Walker regarding Dr. King's refusal to reveal the name of the persons recommending and interviewing Jack O'Dell.

Telegram Text from MLK to USAG Robert Kennedy

Sunday, October 6, 1963

Dr. King requests that Attorney General Robert Kennedy intervene in New Orleans to prevent further intimidation of civil rights supporters by police.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Substance

Dr. King records some thoughts on the topic "substance," "a term used to signify that which is sought when philosophers investigate the primary being of things."

Schedule for Oslo Trip

This itinerary outlines Dr. King's schedule leading up to the Nobel Peace Prize Award Ceremony. The itinerary includes flight arrangements, speaking engagements, interviews, sight seeing, press conferences and tourist activities.

Letter from James Gilliam to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1961

Mr. Gilliam sends Dr. King financial support in the amount of fifty dollars.

Letter from Ivor Liss to MLK

Monday, April 15, 1963

Ivor M. Liss writes Dr. King and explains his support for the movement that Dr. King is leading. He talks about how being silent would actually hurt Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement. Liss explains that as a Jew he understands the fight for equality as it is something that Jewish people are still fighting for. He encloses a check for $100.00.

Numbers

Dr. King records class notes from the biblical Book of Numbers regarding ethics, knowledge, and sin.

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

Royalty Statement for a Payot Published Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement for a French-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" documents royalties earned in 1966.