Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"ALGERIA"

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Friday, November 3, 1967

Mr. Green encloses a foreword to Dr. Neal Sullivan's book by Dr. King.

Death

Dr. King records some notes on death.

Letter from Joan Finney to MLK

Tuesday, September 10, 1963

California Democratic Council Secretary Joan Finney encloses the remainder of a financial contribution to Dr. King and the SCLC. Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker was the keynote speaker for an event held by the council and was presented the first part of this donation.

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

Letter to Rev. Thomas Thrasher from MLK and Others

Friday, January 11, 1957

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders contact the President of the Montgomery Ministerial Association, Rev. Thomas Thrasher, to compliment him on his statement subsequent to the bombings in Alabama.

SCLC Project Report

The staff of SCLC provides a memorandum report to supporters regarding the status of current programs and projects. Important financial facts about the organization are also included.

Social Ethics

This biblical scripture, deriving from the book of Deuteronomy, suggests that people who assist the poor will be blessed.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Chicago Staff

Wednesday, January 10, 1968

Tom Offenburger writes to the SCLC Chicago Office Staff Steering Committee concerning phone call procedures. Offenburger asserts that answering the phone with "Operation Breadbasket" will not reveal the broader interest of the SCLC, and suggests answering the phone with, "good morning, SCLC."

MLK's Own Ticket to the SCLC Banquet

Friday, October 25, 1963

Sometimes you buy your own ticket to your own show!

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Friday, August 9, 1963

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

Letter from Mr. Raymond F. Gregory to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1962

In this letter dated 2/28/1962, Mr. Raymond F. Gregory of a New York City law firm writes to Dr. King regarding legal considerations for the "Ghandi [sic] Foundation."

MLK Fights For Peace

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Included on page four of this Bedding, Curtain and Drapery Workers Union newsletter is an article regarding Dr. King's courageous efforts in helping Negros achieve equality, and the support he has received from the trade union. The union also supports Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam war, and agrees that the war is harming America's domestic programs against poverty.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Sermon Notes on Character

This document contains Dr. King's notes on character.

Letter from James Hershey to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

Joe T. Denman writes Dr. King on behalf of the Citizens For Progress Organization hoping to sponsor a speaking date in Yakima, Washington. Denman requests that the Reverend forward the date that he will arrive.

Letter from Peggy Seldes to MLK

Friday, July 31, 1964

Peggy Seldes thanks Dr. King for responding to her daughter's previous letter. Peggy goes on to praise Dr. King for his I Have A Dream speech given during the March On Washington of August 28, 1963.

MLK Discusses Plans for the 1963 March on Washington

Wednesday, January 23, 1963

While in Detroit, Michigan, Dr. King discloses his intentions for the upcoming March on Washington.

Letter to MLK from Wyatt Tee Walker of New York's Canaan Baptist Church

Thursday, August 24, 1967

Wyatt Walker comments on the positive relations between Jews and African Americans and asks Dr. King to support the new nation of Israel.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Exodus in reference to "the idea of a primitive anthropomorphic God."

Should F.E.P.C. Become a Federal Law?

In this draft article Dr. King discusses employment discrimination and the need for the Fair Employment Practices Commission to become legislation.

Letter from Cheryl Chambers to MLK

Thursday, November 28, 1963

Cheryl Chambers asks Dr. King to send an autographed picture and a copy of his Letter from Birmingham Jail. She is doing a paper on civil rights for her government project and requests any available literature. Ms. Chambers, who is also a member of the NAACP Youth Council, informs Dr. King that the Council is getting ready to begin their membership drive and inquires if he has any helpful suggestions.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jutson Sapp

Friday, July 10, 1964

Dr. King writes Mr. Sapp expressing how unhappy he is concerning Mr. Sapp's difficulty in receiving assistance from the Social Security Program.

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Schedule

Monday, August 3, 1964

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Victor Weybright will telephone his London organization. Joan then suggests that Dr. King make himself available in London on August 17.

Letter from Bishop K. Chengalvaroya Pillai to MLK

Saturday, August 27, 1966

Bishop K. Chengalvaroya Pillai writes Dr. King asking if he can read his recently published book entitled "Light Through an Eastern Window" and write a book review. His book "acquaints the people of the Western World with the thought and ways of life of the Eastern world in relation to the Bible."

Letter from Henry Hart Rice to MLK

Monday, June 5, 1967

Henry Hart Rice sends Dr. King a contribution to express his support for the work of the SCLC.

Diary in Jail

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King wrote a personal diary of his day-to-day experiences while in an Albany, Georgia jail for attempting to pray in front of City Hall. He pledged to return to jail, if necessary, if the City Commission refused to negotiate with Negro leaders on demands for immediate desegregation of all public facilities.