Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"ALGERIA"

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

Letter from James H. Bowman to Rev. Andrew J. Young

Saturday, July 2, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Columbus, OH, Cleveland, OH

James H. Bowman writes to Rev. Young requesting for Mr. Ralph Henry to be stationed by SCLC on the near west side of Chicago.

God

These notes highlight various conceptions of 'God' as revealed through Dr. King's scholarship.

Letter from Glenn E. Smiley to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965
New York (NY)

In this letter, Mr. Smiley requests an endorsement from Dr. King on the creation of a non-violent training film by The Fellowship of Reconciliation.

Letter from Claudine Shannon to MLK

Tuesday, December 7, 1965
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Claudine Shannon, a member of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, asks Dr. King to officiate her wedding ceremony. She mentions that he married her brother several years ago and explains that the bridegroom will cover all of Dr. King's expenses.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes Alfred Tennyson on the topic of immortality.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites Vergilius Ferm’s “First Chapters in Religious Philosophy.”

MLK Statement on Libel Suit

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding a libel suit. He explains that he has been served papers but is not at liberty to comment.

Telegram from Reverend Fred L Shuttlesworth to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962
Cleveland, OH, Albany, GA, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), Georgia (GA)

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy assures Dr. King that the nation extends their congratulations and prayer for his success. Reverend Abernathy asserts that as soldiers of freedom, they must "win this battle" for their country and that there "can be no retreat" in the movement.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
New York, NY

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

Letter from Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild

Monday, January 9, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Georgia (GA)

This letter is an invitation from Rabbi Rothschild to the Eighteenth Annual Institute for the Christian Clergy. Throughout the letter the Rabbi outlines the activities of the day and expresses his appreciation for all who will attend.

Godm (Micah)

Dr. King refers to the biblical book of Micah to write about Micah and Hosea's similar reference to the strength of the love of God.

MLK's Weekend Itinerary

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

This itinerary reflects Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements at various churches and schools throughout Alabama.

The Luminous Promise

Saturday, December 1, 1962

This draft of "The Luminous Promise," published in the December 1962 issue of The Progressive, marks the 100th celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the article Dr. King writes, "there is but one way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. That is to make its declaration of freedom real."

Jesus (Did Jesus Ever Live)

Dr. King references "The Historical Jesus and the Theological Christ."

The Crisis in America's Cities

Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

Dr. King provides an analysis of "social disorder" and a plan of action against poverty, discrimination and racism in Urban America. Dr. King states that, "If the soul is left in darkness, sins will be committed."

Letter from Nathan Watts to MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Mr. Watts asks Dr. King to call off the March on Washington because of the political backlash he foresees. He predicts the march will harm the civil rights bill that is being discussed in Congress., which would later be passed as the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E.Mays to William J. Trent, Jr.

Friday, January 31, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays is notifying William Trent that Dr. King will meet with John D. Rockefellar, III at his office on Feburary 6. What the meeting is about is not specified in the letter.

Operation Breadbasket: A Statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

Dr. King announces an agreement made with Pick-n-Pay Supermarkets that will open numerous jobs for the Negro community. The

Letter from Imogene Cashmore to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Washington, D.C., CONGO / ZAIRE, Wisconsin (WI), SOUTH AFRICA

Imogene Cashmore responds to Senator Dodd's recent statement in Congress about Moise Tshombe, a Congo politician who had recently been jailed on charges of treason. Cashmore condemns Senators Robert and Ted Kennedy for not trying to help Tshombe, questioning why there has been no negative response to the current government of Congo, which Cashmore charges is rampant with "mass murder and violation of civil rights."

SCLC Form Letters

The first letter states that Dr. King is out of the city for a few days. The second letter expresses gratitude for the recipient's moral support and Christian generosity.

The Atlanta Constitution: Dr. King Warns Against the Riots

Tuesday, June 27, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Eugene Patterson describes Dr. King's position against violent race riots and the consequences of these movements on the Black and White community.

Bread at Midnight

Tuesday, December 13, 1966
Georgia (GA), SOUTH AFRICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Notes from S.B. Well to Ralph Abernathy

Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA

S. B. Well forwards Rev. Ralph Abernathy notes about several upcoming and current events pertaining to voter registration in the second and third district of Georgia.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Charles Ocasio

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is a letter of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

Tuesday, September 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Letter from Patricia Reid to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Patricia Reid has mixed feelings about Dr. King and the position he has taken. Even though she and her husband agree with this stance on civil rights, they respectfully disagree on his position on the Vietnam War. The Reids believe that Dr. King shouldn't interfere with foreign policy unless he can come up with a viable solution to end the Vietnam War. However, they still feel compelled to contribute to the work of the SCLC, but warn Dr. King that other individuals may not be that sympathetic.

Letter from Roger Loewi to MLK

New York (NY)

Roger Loewi wrote this letter to inform Dr. King of his mutual friendship with King adviser, Stanley Levison. Lastly, Mr. Loewi requested for a brief meeting with Dr. King.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 27, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA)

Mr. Schaefer writes Dora McDonald seeking confirmation for Dr. King's scheduled appearance at Kennett Square.