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"ANGOLA"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Kates

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Ralph Kates on behalf of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit St. Joseph College.

SCLC Benefit Appeal

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Dr. King personally requests the support of forty organizations for SCLC's "Stars for Freedom" benefit. The appeal states that featured artists at the event include Harry Belafonte, Aretha Franklin, and Sidney Portier, and Dr. King will also be speaking at the event.

Letter from Duncan Wood to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

This letter outlines Dr. King's upcoming trip to Moscow. The purpose of the mission is to have past Nobel Peace Prize winners partake in an initiative to promote peace in Vietnam.

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Dr. King asks Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach for an investigation of voter irregularities in the Georgia Democratic primary election.

Letter from James H. Ridgely to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Attorney Ridgely requests that Dr. King sends his social security number in order for Addison H. Flournoy's federal estate tax return to be filed.

Antagonistic Letter

Abraham Lincoln is referenced in this negative message.

Letter from Mr. Burke Marshall to MLK Regarding Political Opinion

Thursday, September 15, 1966

In this document, Mr. Mashall writes to Dr. King regarding issues surrounding the National Advisory Commission on Selective Service. He requests that Dr. King writes on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference on matters further outlined in Section 2.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Monday, September 25, 1967

Telegram from Duncan Wood on behalf of the Oslo Committee, hoping to arrange interviews in Moscow with Dr. King and Father Pire.

Telegram From Mrs. Mary Kru to MLK

Saturday, March 12, 1966

In this telegram, Mrs. Mary Kru writes to Dr. King, "your plans of operation put me out of work".

MLK Sermon: The Dimensions of A Complete Life

Sunday, April 19, 1959

In this sermon given at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King details the three dimensions of a complete life: length, breadth, and height.

Letter from MLK to Ambassador Adlai Stevenson

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks Adlai Stevenson, America's ambassador to the UN, for sponsoring a reception in his honor following his trip to Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. He commends Stevenson on his dedication to promote peace and reason in helping to solve world problems.

Letter from Mary E. Peabody to MLK

Thursday, June 29, 1967

Mary E. Peabody writes a letter requesting that Dr. King send her a copy of one of his books along with a signature. She also informs him of her opinion on education and the racial issues the city of Boston faces.

Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to Reverend Allen L. Johnson

Monday, April 12, 1965

Chauncey Eskridge informs Reverend Johnson that he has sought information from Jack H. Young and R. Jess Brown regarding the posting of bond money.

Letter from Percy A. Blackburn to Ed Clayton

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Percy A. Blackburn refers to a previous letter Alice Bucher, president of S. J. Bucher Ltd. Lucerne sent Ed Clayton, SCLC Director of Public Relations, concerning their book about the History of the American Negro. Blackburn encloses a "resume of the proposed contents of the book." He also informs Mr. Clayton of Mrs. Bucher and her associate's current visit to the US and that they would like to arrange an appointment with Dr. King at his convenience.

SCLC Constituent to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, May 2, 1968

This letter, originating from New York City in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination, is from a supporter who is inquiring about the purchase of items relating to Dr. King's correspondence.

Prayer Pilgrimage

Various quotes are cited surrounding Dr. King's perception on love, nonviolence, spirituality, Montgomery, and more. Dr. King elaborates on the history of Montgomery and its direct relation to slavery. Ebony Magazine releases the exclusive eight-point "Plan for Freedom" for Montgomery, calling Negros to mobilize for an all-out assault on segregation."The Death of Evil' is also cited which correlates such evil with details from the book of Exodus.

Autograph Request

German citizen, Reinhold Kohl, requests an autograph of Dr. King for his collection.

Judith Ann Jones Writes Mr. Ralph Helstein Inquiring About Consideration for a Scholarship.

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

College Student Judith Ann Jones writes Ralph Helstein, President of United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers, about the Russell H. Bull Scholarship. She explains how she plans to use the scholarship to further encourage others to be more racially tolerant.

Newspaper Article about MLK

Saturday, August 21, 1965

In this article, Horace Sheffield responds to speculation that Dr. King will hold a "Summer Crusade" in Detroit.

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

Telegram from ABC Network to Ralph David Abernathy

Monday, April 22, 1968

A correspondent from the American Broadcasting Company Network in Washington D.C. contacts Reverend Ralph Abernathy attempting to continue an interview previously scheduled with Dr. King before his death.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Letter from MLK to George E. Bass

Thursday, April 7, 1966

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the Annual Luncheon for the Planned Parenthood Association.

Telegram from A. J. Gervantes to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Mayor Cervantes of St. Louis, invites Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is."

Letter from Joan Daves to Harry H. Wachtel

Friday, November 6, 1964

Joan Daves sends Mr. Watchel a copy of a proposed Memorandum of Agreement for the distribution of hand lettered copies of Martin Luther King's speech I Have A Dream.

Sincerity and Intelligence

Dr. King reviews the Christian teaching of sincerity and its relationship to intelligence. Referencing Judaistic history and a biblical story involving the Apostle Paul, he comments that sincerity alone is lacking. He insists that Christians must infuse their sincerity with intelligence in order to "solve the spiritual problems of the world."

Northern District of Mississippi Court Order

Tuesday, November 8, 1966

District Court Judge Claude F. Clayton for Mississippi, issues an order sustaining part of the motion for supplemental relief on behalf of minor plaintiffs, Sharper T. Cunningham and Darlene Cunningham vs. Grenada Municipal Separate School District of Mississippi.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, May 28, 1964

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King, along with others, that the Detroit News will run installments for "Why We Cant Wait." They are also told that the copyright will be in Dr. King's name and that credit will be given to Harper and NAL.

Letter from Joseph F. McCrindle to SCLC

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Joseph F. McCrindle, President of the Henfield Foundation, encloses a check of $250.00 to SCLC on behalf of the Henfield Foundation.