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"ANGOLA"

Letter from Mayor El-Khatib of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967

Rouhi El-Khatib, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Jordan, welcomes Dr. King to the city in advance of a pilgrimage planned for November 1967. At the time of this letter, East Jerusalem was part of Jordan and West Jerusalem was Israeli territory. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

Bayard Rustin writes to Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference sponsored by the A. Philip Randolph Education Fund. The conference focuses on "The Role of Press in a Period of Social Crisis."

Letter from Gerald H. Anderson to MLK

Friday, April 10, 1964

Gerald Anderson, the Academic Dean at Union Theolgical Seminary, writes Dr. King asking him to contribute to a volume of sermons for publishing.

MLK Draft Notes: Worship

Dr. King preached this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist church on August 7, 1955. In this handwritten outline, Dr. King focuses on the practice of worship, claiming that it is an intrinsic part of human culture. After outlining a negative definition of worship, he approaches it from a "positive angle," describing a multitude of experiences he deems worshipful. Ultimately, he asserts that worship is useful on both a private and public level as it "helps us to transcend the hurly-burly of everyday life."

Temple Sholom Bulletin

Saturday, September 19, 1964

This issue of the Temple Shalom Bulletin highlights Dr. King and his accomplishments during the Civil Rights Movement.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Marcus Tullius Cicero’s “De Natura Deorum,” providing references from William Wallace’s “The Logic of Hegel.”

Letter from Hubert Williams to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

A member of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the increased tension between Negros and New York police.

Dr. King To Lead Holy Land Tour

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a new release regarding Dr. King's planned Pilgrimage to the Holy Land in November.

Letter from Nancy and Bill Brodie to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Nancy and Bill Brodie write Mrs. King to express their sympathy regarding Dr. King's assassination. As a method to comfort Mrs. King, Nancy includes a poem that she wrote for her father when he died.

Pelagianism

Dr. King defines Pelagianism as the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without divine aid.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Jessie C. Treichler

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Mrs. Treichler to inform her that she will provide Dr. and Mrs. King arrival time at a later date. She also explains that Dr. King's physician has highly recommended that he limits his amount of events during his travels, therefore she feels sure that he will not be able to commit to all of her suggestions.

Telegram from Stanley Levison to Coretta Scott King

Friday, January 17, 1969

Stanley Levison warns Mrs. King about interceding between governments.

Dewey

Dr. King records John Dewey's views on philosophy and religion.

Letter from Robert S. Swann to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

This letter to Dr. King accompanies the enclosure of a proposal regarding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Co-operative Association. Robert Swann hopes that this proposal can be discussed at the upcoming SCLC meeting in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Roger Dunloff, Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 5, 1962

Due to his inability to contribute financially, Roger G. Dunloff offers his prayers and moral support to Dr. King and the SCLC.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Miss Dora McDonald provides Dr. King with a synopsis of updates regarding invitations and correspondences. She notifies Dr. King of the Ann Morris School of Arts attendance at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Eugene Carson Blake's response to Dr. King's acceptance to speak, and V. M. Herron requests of 300 "Black is Beautiful" pamphlets. In addition, she informs Dr. King of the recent telephone calls from various individuals.

Numbers

Dr. King records class notes from the biblical Book of Numbers regarding ethics, knowledge, and sin.

Thirty-nine Articles

Dr. King writes notes regarding the "basic doctrinal formula of the Anglican Church."

Letter from Gloria Glissmeyer Regarding the State of the Nation

Thursday, February 29, 1968

The following document is a letter written by Gloria Glissmeyer discussing the state of the nation during the Spring of 1968. The letter summarizes a series of events ranging from the Presidential Commission on Civil Disorder to the number of Americans killed in Vietnam.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Hans Massaquoi

In this telegram, Dora McDonald writes to Mr. Massaquoi from Ebony Magazine, informing him that Dr. King is not left handed.

Letter to Clark, Dodge and Company from MLK

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Here is a letter from Dr. King to anonymous donor through Clark, Dodge and Company acknowledging the receipt of stock shares to the SCLC. Dr. King goes on to elaborate on how this contribution will directly impact the efforts of SCLC.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

MLK's Remarks on Conference with the President

Monday, June 23, 1958

Dr. King provides the perspective he shared at a meeting held by the President with leaders from the white and Negro community discussing civil rights. His speech includes several steps to reach equality across the US.

Letter from Alma Weil to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Alma Weil expresses deep intolerance for prejudice and further discloses a desire to support Dr. King's efforts.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

A. Philip Randolph writes Dr. King requesting that he join as a sponsor in the campaign to decrease customers of the two chief banks supporting apartheid in South Africa.

Speaking Out

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

Letter from Ann & John Flynn

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

In this letter, Ann Flynn requests a copy of the text of Dr. King's speech made at Riverside Church.

Receipt to the Motown Record Corporation

Monday, October 3, 1966

The following receipt was issued by the SCLC to the Motown Record Corporation for their financial contribution.

Knowing God (Wieman)

Dr. King notes Henry Nelson Wieman's ideas on how man comes to know God.