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Letter from H. Melvin Lieberstein to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Indiana (IN), Pennsylvania (PA)

H. Melvin Lieberstein thanks Dr. King for the personal letter Lieberstein received. Lieberstein adds quiet support to Dr. King, stating that in his chosen career field he regrets an inability to provide more active support.

Letter from Librarian Olive Ann Tamborelle to MLK

Tuesday, October 26, 1965
New Jersey (NJ)

Olive Ann Tamborelle, Director of the Teaneck Public Library, asks Dr. King to name the book that has had the greatest effect on his life, other than The Bible. She informs him that the information will be used in an exhibit for National Library Week.

Suffering

Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

Form Letter Regarding the Civil Rights Movement

In this form letter the author talks about the necessity to eliminate ignorance.

Letter from Dr. King to Bert Onne

Monday, April 25, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King commends Bert Onne on the continued support and the accommodations received on his visit to Sweden. He also acknowledges how grateful he is for Onne's work for the Martin Luther King Fund.

MLK Responds to Robert W. Fischer on Autographed Cover of TIME Magazine

Tuesday, March 24, 1964
ITALY

Dr. King responds to Robert Fischer's request for is Autographed cover of TIME magazine. He expresses his appreciation of Fischer's support and how honored he was to receive the title of Man of the Year. Dr. King views this honor as a tribute to the entire civil rights movement and those who continuously pursue the fight for social justice.

Handwritten Notes on Sacramentalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sacramentalism. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from Ronald H. Lind to MLK

Thursday, March 9, 1967
Missouri (MO)

Reverend Ronald Lind writes to Dr. King, urging him to take a positive stand on the integrity of Representative Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Keith Black to MLK

Sunday, May 8, 1966
Minnesota (MN)

Keith Black, on behalf of the Valley Community Presbyterian Church, sends Dr. King a check for the SCLC.

Letter from Michael J. Gerstley to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963
Illinois (IL), Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Michael J. Gerstley desires to continue to legacy of his grandfather's, Dr. Samuel Loebenstein, autograph collection from over 1500 prominent leaders. Dr. Loebenstein's collection is unique because he would request the leaders to sign over a stamp that correlated with their vocation. Mr. Gerstley provides Dr. King with a stamp of George Washington Carver to carry on his grandfather's collection.

Royalty Statement from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Harper and Row

Monday, April 10, 1967
New York (NY)

J. Campe informs Dr. King of the deductions for his royalty check from Harper and Row.

Note from Joan Daves to Dr. King

Sunday, September 22, 1963
UNITED KINGDOM, New York (NY), London, England

This note is to request Dr. King's signature on a contract with British publishers, Hodder & Stroughton in London for his book "Strength To Love."

Letter from Ralph Ahlberg to Ralph David Abernathy

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Minister Ahlberg extends condolences on behalf of The Congregational Church of Rockville Centre to Rev. Abernathy upon the assassination of Dr. King.

The Function of the Field Staff

Tuesday, July 10, 1962
New York, NY

The Department of Organization in the Congress of Racial Equality releases a memorandum detailing the function of the field staff position. The responsibilities include stimulating new activity for the group and acting as a consultant.

Letter from William Welsh to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

William Welsh objects to Cassius Clay's (Muhammad Ali) rejection to enter the draft for the Vietnam War. Mr. Welsh asks that if Dr. King agrees with this notion, he should denounce Mr. Clay publicly.

Letter from E.E. Adams to MLK

California (CA)

E. E. Adams relates his thoughts about the constitutionality of urban renewal.

Letter from Erma Jewell Hughes to MLK

Wednesday, February 12, 1964
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Erma Jewell Hughes writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize award and cover on Time Magazine as "Man of the Year." Hughes invites the Reverend to speak at the Business College's annual commencement and encloses traveling expenses for the event. Hughes also states that they are raising additional funds to go towards the "Freedom Fight."

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS)

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

People In Action: The Role of the Church

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation and the role of the church in rectifying the situation.

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Letter from H. C. Whitley to MLK

Friday, September 3, 1965
UNITED KINGDOM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

H. C. Huntley invites Dr. King to come speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Scotland during Holy Week.

Remarks of MLK: En Granslos Kval Pa Operan

Thursday, March 31, 1966
SWEDEN, EGYPT, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this address, Dr. King expresses his Dream for America and his sincere appreciation for Sweden's support for "the cause of racial justice in America."

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Monday, May 25, 1964
Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

Letter from John Language to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

John Langone asks Dr. King to write an article for his psychology journal on violence.

Speaking Out

New York, NY

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

Letter from Josephine Davis to Dr. King

Friday, June 24, 1966
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Josephine Davis tells Dr. King that they enjoyed the evening he spent with them. She then informs him that their prayers are with him and that he can look forward to financial help from "THOSE".

Letter from Wilmer Young to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM

Wilmer Young writes Dr. King commending him for taking a stand against the Vietnam War and its connection with civil rights.

MLK - Form Letter Draft

Dr. King writes a form letter to acknowledge the "sacrifices, fasting, and prayer" from people throughout the world.

Report to Agenda Committee

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Junius Griffin sends Bill Berry a report and tentative program regarding summer events in Chicago during the 1966 Civil Rights Campaign.