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Telegram from Rev. Benjamin Bickers to MLK

Sunday, September 25, 1966
New Orleans, LA

Reverend Benjamin Weldon Bickers sends his congratulations to Dr. King on his birthday and expresses his inability to be present during the celebration due to prior engagements.

Letter from Dora McDonald to T. M. Benson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963
Colorado (CO), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King's secretary responds to a request from Peak Publications to use a portion of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract. Ms. Dora explains to the company's representative that the letter will be published in an upcoming book, hence Dr. King has made a commitment to the publisher to refuse permission for reprints.

Telegram from Truman Douglass to MLK about Pending Letter

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

This telegram was sent to Dr. King from Truman D. Douglass regarding an upcoming telegram pertaining to nine conditions set forth in an earlier letter. Douglass is the Chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Walter Ducey

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Chicago, IL, St. Augustine, FL

Dora McDonald informs Walter Ducey that Dr. King is out of town at the moment and grants him permission to include Dr. King's photograph and remarks in the publication he is producing.

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968
Iowa (IA)

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

Bill of Complaint: City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS)

The City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama accuses several civil rights leaders and organizations of discouraging Negro students from attending public schools.

I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

New York (NY), California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966
New York (NY)

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Letter from Robert Stock to MLK

Thursday, April 21, 1966
New York (NY)

Robert Stock sends Dr. King a copy of a magazine called "Petroleum Today." The magazine offers their audience public information about the oil industry as well as human interests including education, art, and history.

Letter from Jan Jansen to MLK

Thursday, February 20, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, SWEDEN, DENMARK

Jan Helgo Jansen sends a letter on the behalf of the student organizations in Norway, Denmark and Sweden, inviting Dr. King to speak in Scandinavia.

Letter to MLK from Bertha Fiege Regarding Speech at Riverside Church

Friday, April 7, 1967
Washington (WA)

In this letter, Bertha Fiege is commending Dr. King on his speech at Riverside Church. She feels he serves great importance to furthering unity, not only racially, but around the world as well.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

This document is a royalty statement from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. for his text "Stride Toward Freedom". June 14, 1967

Philosophy

Dr. King writes about the proper function of philosophy.

UAW 25th Anniversary Dinner Program

Thursday, April 27, 1961
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Indiana (IN)

The UAW's 25th Anniversary Dinner Program contains letters from notable activists commending the UAW, a statement from President Kennedy, a guest list, the evening's program, and a list of sponsors and donors. Guest speakers include: Dr. King, Senator Paul Douglas, Secretary of Labor Arthur Goldberg, and UAW President Walter Reuther.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964
Oslo, Norway, Washington, D.C., London, England, New York (NY)

In this letter Ms. Daves informs Dr. King that she is working to solve issue of copyright for his Oslo University address, and stresses the importance of copyrighting all of his "writings...and speeches."

Plowshare Pledge from Sargent Shriver

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Indiana (IN), VIETNAM

This Plowshare Pledge, signed by Sargent Shriver, vows to use voting powers to have the savings of the military expenses invested in domestic human resources.

Draft of Statement by MLK on his Involvement With the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers

Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King wishes to clarify his endorsement of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. He states that he did not mean to imply that there was a civil rights issue in the "collective bargaining election," but rather that he admires the accomplishments of the labor movement.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Tuesday, January 12, 1965
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Friday, November 1, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.

Letter from Thomas Baker to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Thomas Baker, a student in New York City, sends his condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Secretary to Daniel C. Thompson

Tuesday, December 11, 1962
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

Dr. King's Secretary writes Dr. Daniel Thompson of Howard University and encloses a foreword written by Dr. King, discussing violence and the philosophies of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from MLK to Carmen Baptista

VENEZUELA

Dr. King writes Carmen Baptista expressing deep appreciation for his letter of encouragement and for sending a recording of his song, "Coming Down the Road."

Letter from Frederick B. Hewitt to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Hewitt, pastor of the Grace United Church in Gananoque, Ontario, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He also extends an invitation to Dr. King to vacation with his family at Half Moon Bay.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

This document is a letter from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. in regards to New York Times Magazine's request to reprint Dr. King's publication: "Where We Are Going". April 26, 1967

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963
Texas (TX), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Legal Petition Made by Karl Von Key Against Selective Service System

Wednesday, June 15, 1966
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, VIETNAM

Karl Von Key petitions the United States District Court of California about his draft into the armed forces. He contends that, as a person of color, he is a colonial subject, not a citizen of the United States. As a colonial subject, he should not be forced to serve in the military. He also writes that he is a conscientious objector and that he believes he was targeted by the local induction station because of his social and political views.

Letter from M. L. Teer Regarding Housing Conditions

Memphis, TN, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

M. L. Teer writes a letter to Senator Robert F. Kennedy on behalf of her nephew, Robert Williams of Chicago, IL.

Letter to MLK concerning nonviolent approaches

Friday, August 12, 1966
New York (NY)

Mrs. Ettinger offers Dr. King advice on a alternative approach to advance human rights. She also explains how it is up to blacks within the communities to make a better effort towards equality.