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Letter from Mrs. Emil Singdahlsen to MLK

Friday, March 17, 1967
New York (NY)

Mildred Singdahlsen writes to Dr. King concerning the attitude of negro leaders regarding New York Congressman, Adam Clayton Powell. She calls Powell, "not only dishonest, but an opportunist who selfishly advances his own ends," and expresses her hope that Dr. King would speak out about the situation.

Letter from the Speakers Bureau to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968
Chicago, IL

The Speakers Bureau writes Dr. King as they are preparing to publish a new edition of the Speakers Booklet for 1968-69. They request Dr. King's biography, topics of discussion, a recent photo, and ask his general availability.

God: Attributes, Relation to World et.

Dr. King references numerous biblical scriptures on the attributes of God.

Telegram from MLK to Chris Folker

SWEDEN

Dr. King expresses enthusiasm regarding his upcoming trip to Sweden.

Telegram to Dr. Benjamin Spock from MLK

Monday, May 29, 1967
Cleveland, OH, SWITZERLAND

In May 1967 Dr. King sends a telegram to Dr. Spock (an American pediatrician whose book Baby and Child Care, published in 1946, is one of the biggest best-sellers of all time) while he is in Geneva to praise him on taking a stance on controversial issues.

Letter from MLK to Joan Daves

Saturday, August 29, 1964
New York, NY

In this response letter, Dr. King encloses a revised copy of a manuscript from an article of which the reverend planned to make additional changes to.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Alfred T. Davies

Monday, October 21, 1963
Ohio (OH)

Dora McDonald informs Rev. Alfred T. Davies that Dr. King will not be able to submit a sermon for "The Church Speaks on Race." Dr. King has just published "Strength to Love," which includes his sermons on many of the aspects of the civil rights movement.

Memo from Weston Hare to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968
Richmond, VA

Weston Hare offers support to Dr. King in regards to SCLC's training program for Negro ministers in urban leadership. The Ford Foundation issued a grant to SCLC to fund the program.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles E. Boddie

Friday, February 17, 1961
New York (NY), New York, NY, Connecticut (CT)

Dora McDonald informs Charles Boddie that Dr. King cannot accept any speaking engagements for his desired date because he has previously committed to having lunch with some students and faculty.

The Freedom Movement and the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 1, 1967
New York (NY)

In this reprint of an article originally printed in the fall of 1965, Professor Robert S. Browne makes a charge to the Department of Defense that the Negro troops were being used in Vietnam in disproportionate numbers. Freedomsways publications re-released the publication due to its remarkably fresh and informative content and high demand.

Letter from Jan A. Hatch & Norman A. Bacon to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), Selma, AL

Jan Hatch and Norman Bacon, white citizens of Athol, Massachusetts, write Dr. King inquiring about how they can contribute to the fight for racial equality. They inform him of the non-existent Negro population in Athol and request information on how to join the NAACP if it is conducive to their movement and financial limitations.

Man

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man,” noting that modern culture has come to understand more of nature and less of man.

Notes for an Address to Memphis Strikers

Dr. King drafted these notes, which were used in an address given in Memphis, Tennessee in March of 1968. "Dives" is a Biblical character who refused to give aid to the poor and was condemned for it.

Public Statement at the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Wednesday, July 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King speaks at a rally held for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Dr. King stresses the importance of government assistance in protecting African Americans citizens from violent actions when registering and voting during elections. In areas such as Mississippi where harassment and murders took place frequently, African Americans were in dire need of a political party that was free of racism so that they could fairly be represented in a prejudice society.

Marx

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from Arnold Aronson to Cooperating Organizations

Friday, August 30, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), MEXICO, Oregon (OR), Illinois (IL), Texas (TX)

Arnold Aronson writes cooperating organizations to ensure that following the March on Washington, the government delivers on the stipulations of the Civil Rights Bill.

MLK Makes Request About Bill Stein

Monday, November 21, 1966
New York, NY

Dr. King requests that the Protestant Episcopal Church of New York allow Bill Stein to continue his work with SCLC programs.

Letter from James T. Hale to MLK

Tuesday, September 22, 1964
Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA

Morehouse alumnus James T. Hale invites Dr. King to speak to the community in Clarksville, Tennessee. He expresses how the majority of the community has not had the opportunity to hear Dr. King speak and asks that Dr. King provide a possible date.

The Pastor and His Reference Library

Pennsylvania (PA)

Here is "The Pastor and His Reference Library" by Edward C. Starr. Starr served as librarian at Bucknell. Dr. King more than likely used this resource to conduct research and organize citations while attending Crozer Theological Seminary in Upland, PA.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Introduction to Philosophy." Brightman was a Christian theologan in the Methodist tradition.

Letter from Bond R. Faulwell to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963
Iowa (IA)

Faulwell, a freshman at Grinnell College, is writing a term paper on civil rights for a political science course and requests advice from Dr. King as an "acknowledged leader" of the protest movement.

Letter from MLK to Moreland Griffith Smith, Sr.

Tuesday, February 23, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee to the US Commission Civil Rights, in advance for advising him at the upcoming meeting. Dr. King states that he is sending Reverend Andrew Young to represent the SCLC.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK Regarding the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Thursday, July 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, John Lewis encourages Dr. King to start a letter writing campaign to prevent the illegal election of Representatives from Mississippi. Lewis offers Dr. King assistance from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Stanley Singer to MLK

Sunday, August 5, 1962
INDIA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Stanley Singer replies to Dr. King's article in the NY Times Magazine entitled, "The Case Against 'Tokenism'." Mr. Singer implies that the Negro race is inferior due to their immorality. He highlights the perceived negative attributes of the African American community by the inadequacies within their family structure. Mr. Singer expounds on nonviolent resistance, the Civil War, the U.S. constitution, and more.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey B. Preston

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL

Dora McDonald sends a reply to the Mrs. Carey B. Preston accepting an invitation on behalf of Dr. King.

Letter From Heather Burke to the SCLC

Sunday, August 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Nashville, TN

Heather Burke informs the SCLC of her upcoming attendance as a student at Vanderbilt University. She wishes to volunteer with the organization.

Beyond Condemnation

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Beyond Condemnation." He references the biblical story about a woman condemned to death by the Pharisees for adultery. Jesus commands "the person without sin to cast the first stone" as a lesson that all sins are equal and that no one should judge the flaws of others.

The Southern Patriot: Today's Hero The Negro Child

New Orleans, LA

This column highlights the brave children who endured the hardships of hostile mobs as they blazed the trail for school integration.

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965
Atlanta, GA