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"ARGENTINA"

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

SCLC's Interest in the Chicago Education System

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference initiates improvement for Chicago's education system by making recommendations. It is believed that the inadequacies of education are not only a southern issue, but a national occurrence.

Letter from Robert Lee King to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

A member of Ebenezer Baptist Church expresses concern over Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham Jail. Robert Lee King also shares his wish that he could physically be in jail as well to aid in the "freedom of all Americans." Though nothing in the letter has been blocked out, the letter does contain a stamp of the word "censored."

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Thursday, December 20, 1956

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.

Letter from Gene Riley to MLK

Monday, March 14, 1966

Gene Riley writes Coretta Scott King requesting that she contribute to a spring planting project.

Letter from Bill Daniels to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 2, 1967

Bill Daniels, the editorial cartoonist for WSB Radio and Television, responded to a letter he received from Ms. Dora McDonald concerning a cartoon. He suggested that she have her television adjusted, as the cartoon is "by no means a negro."

Letter from Steve Adams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Steve Adams devotes his support to Dr. King and the nonviolent movement. He mistakenly expresses condolences to Dr. King on the death of his father. However, Dr. King's father "Daddy King" would not pass away until November of 1984.

Letter from MLK to Gaylord Nelson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Gaylord Nelson, a United States Senator from Wisconsin, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Schleiermacher (The Church)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to John F. Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Rev. Ralph Abernathy accepts President John F. Kennedy’s invitation to meet and discuss the civil rights problem.

Imago Dei

From Luther's Commentary of Genesis, Dr. King records a description of "Imago Dei," which means the image of God. Martin Luther was an author, German priest, theologian and influencer of Dr. King.

Letter from Samuel Aggrey Forson

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Samuel Aggrey Forson, President of the International Affairs Association of Legon, writes to convey condolences regarding the assassination of MLK., Jr.

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Thursday, December 27, 1962

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

Letter from Daniel F. Byrne to MLK

Wednesday, September 14, 1966

Lieutenant Colonel Daniel F. Byrne, an army chaplain from the 24th Infantry Division, requests a copy of the address Dr. King gave to the World Conference of Churches in Switzerland.

Letter from MLK to J. S. Beckington

Wednesday, June 15, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. J. S. Beckington for his contribution to the SCLC. King also expresses how important the loyal supporters are to his organization.

Letter from Muriel N. Bishop to MLK

Saturday, November 2, 1963

Muriel N. Bishop, President of the Manitoba branch of Voice of Women, invites Dr. King to "address a public meeting" in Winnipeg at his earliest convenience. She expresses their interest in learning about his philosophy and efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Religion and Science

Dr. King writes about the different perspectives of the moralist and scientist, saying a person can be both.

Royalty Statement for Stride Toward Freedom

Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $97.89 for 3765 copies.

Memo from the East Garfield Park Organizing Staff to James Bevel, Bill Briggs, Bernard LaFayette, and Jim Poling

Friday, September 2, 1966

In this memorandum, the organizing staff of East Garfield Park outlines their plans of action to end slums. Their agenda is designed to operate the organization effectively.

Letter from Alice B. Bye to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Alice B. Bye requests that Dr. King send information and a picture for her school report.

Chicago - Striving Toward Progress

The author of this article identifies two leaders, to include Dr. King and Joseph Germano, in the civil rights movement to speak on the new political focus on economic disparities.

Exodus

Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Biblical book of Exodus. Highlighted topics include knowledge, ethics, the doctrine of God, and sin.

SCLC Seventh Annual Convention Brochure

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

This document is a program from the SCLC's Seventh Annual Convention in Richmond, Virginia. The event was hosted by Curtis Harris, president of the Virginia unit of the SCLC.

Tribute to Jimmy Lee Jackson

Friday, February 26, 1965

Dr. King edits a draft of a eulogy he wrote in the wake of four girls killed in a bombing at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King applauded these martyrs, for their brief yet powerful appearance on this Earth and their contribution to the "holy crusade for freedom and human dignity." Reiterating these sentiments, Dr. King edits the eulogy to fit the life story of Jimmy Lee Jackson.

MLK Manuscript: Why We Can't Wait

This document reflects one page of the original manuscript of "Why We Can't Wait." "Why We Can't Wait" is a book by Martin Luther King, Jr. about the civil rights struggle against racial segregation in the United States, and specifically in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Lee Tishler to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Ms. Lee Tishler gives support and praise to Dr. King for speaking out against the conflict in Vietnam.

Telegram from Al Duckett to MLK

Saturday, July 9, 1966

In this telegram to Dr. King, Mr. Al Duckett professes his willingness to protest in Chicago.

Letter from Diane Szymkowski to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Diane Szymkowski of Villa Maria College in Buffalo, New York, writes Dr. King requesting campaign materials such as posters and buttons. She expresses their desire to conduct a campaign for the students illustrating multiple candidates.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Senator Kenneth B. Keating responds to Dr. King's previous message by providing him with a copy of a statement he delivered before the Senate passed the Civil Rights Bill.

Request to Use "I Have a Dream" Speech in a Musical Composition

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Classical composer Irwin Heilner requests Dr. King's permission to sample the "I Have a Dream" speech in a musical work. Heilner specifies his plans to send the song to musicians in order to get it published, and outlines the terms of the royalties if it is successful. The notes at the bottom of the letter indicate that Dr. King referred Heilner to attorney Clarence Jones regarding use of the speech.