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What Is Salvation

Dr. King writes notes regarding several components of salvation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Bennett

Friday, May 13, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Jean Bennett on behalf of Dr. King expressing his regards for offering to donate a substantial portion of the royalties from the recording of "We Ain't What We Was" to an organization of his choice.

Letter from Telly H. Miller to MLK

Tuesday, November 15, 1966

Telly H. Miller, a graduate of the Morehouse School of Religion of the Interdenominational Theological Center and pastor in a West Virginia church, invites Dr. King to their Centennial. Pastor Miller requests that Dr. King deliver the Centennial sermon and explains that his coming will be a "great help" to the community.

Letter from Norman Thomas to the New York Times Editor

Monday, August 28, 1967

Norman Thomas cites an excerpt from a story by Peter Khiss entitled "Rowan Terms Dr. King's Stand on War a Peril to Rights Gains." Mr. Thomas asserts that the statement is incorrect and that he whole "heartily" applauds Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Curtis Harris to Affiliates of West Virginia SCLC

Thursday, February 24, 1966

Curtis Harris discloses information regarding Petersburg Improvement Association's sixth anniversary celebration.

Letter from Nils K. Stahle to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 2, 1964

The Director of the Nobel Foundation, Niles K. Stahle, explains the copyright of Dr. King's Nobel Lecture. Stahle states that the Lecture belongs to the Nobel Foundation and that measures will be taken to preserve its integrity.

Hamilton Goodwill Africa Foundation Invitation to MLK

Friday, June 3, 1966

A.K. Mighton invites Dr. King to speak at the Hamilton Goodwill Africa Foundation. He informs Dr. King of a trip to Africa in which several doctors and ministers traveled to Africa. Mr. Mighton then expresses his hopefulness in Dr. King's acceptance of his invitation.

Dorothy Cotton telegraphs congratulations

Sunday, January 31, 1965

Dorothy Cotton, long-time colleague of Dr. King at Southern Christian Leadership Conference, congratulates Dr. King for being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Cotton was one of the only non-family members to subsequently accompany Dr. King to Oslo, Norway, for the prize ceremony.

Letter from W. E. Charlton to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963

W. E. Charlton of the Curtis Publishing Company informs Dr. King of suspicious Saturday Evening Post order subscriptions under his name to different addresses. Charlton explains that they have cancelled the subscriptions and request that he ignore any billing until the fix is complete. Charlton encloses the fraudulent subscription order forms.

Letter from Maddy Tolud to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Maddy Tolud, the President of A. R. K., thanks Dr. King for being an honorary member of their organization. Tolud assures him that their members will actively work towards equality until justice prevails.

Toynbee

Dr. King quotes British historian Arnold J. Toynbee from his work "A Study of History."

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Smith

Dr. King writes Mr. Smith thanking him for his contribution to the SCLC. He expresses that contributions help American Negroes to "continue in the struggle for freedom and equality."

Letter from Richard C. Gilman to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, November 14, 1966

Richard C. Gilman is pleased that Dr. King has accepted the speaking engagement located at Occidental College and informs Miss McDonald of the honorarium he will be receiving.

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Success and Failure Sermon Outline

"Success and Failure" is the title of a sermon given by Dr. King. The handwritten outline, shown here, referenced Philippians 3:13 as the passage of scripture. The date and location, of which this sermon was delivered is unknown.

Letter from Franklin H. Williams to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Ambassador Williams congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to a United Nations reception.

Letter from Howard Schomer to Robert Kennedy

Saturday, October 26, 1963

Howard Schomer asks the US Attorney General several questions about the legality of a police raid that occurred at a Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) office in New Orleans, Louisiana. Schomer wants to know if the statute under which the raid was carried out has legal force and does the Department of Justice have an obligation to make its evidence public?

Revelation

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from MLK to Ruby Brown

Monday, April 4, 1966

Dr. King writes Ruby Brown of Detroit, Michigan to thank her for her letter regarding the civil rights struggle.

Foreward by MLK: Famous Negro American Series

Dr. King discusses the contributions of Negro Americans to American society, past and present, in this foreward for the publication: Famous Negro American Series.

Letter of Thanks from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College, expresses appreciation to Dr. King for financial support to the college.

Royalty Statement for French Edition of The Strength to Love

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the French edition of Dr. King's "The Strength to Love," published by Casterman S.A. for the period October 1, 1965 to March 31, 1966.

Letter Requesting Help From MLK

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

An unidentified North Carolina man writes Dr. King requesting urgent assistance involving his brutal arrest by a state trooper. According to the man, the trooper physically assaulted him during detainment and ended up breaking two ribs. However, his other peers, mainly Negro, are too afraid to speak up about this police brutality case.

The Montgomery Story

Wednesday, June 27, 1956

Dr. King delivers an address entitled the "Montgomery Story" at the NAACP 47th Annual Convention. He address several issues throughout the address including: segregation, civil rights, equality, slavery and religion.

Letter from the Associated Negro Press to MLK

Saturday, November 27, 1965

Donald Kittell, an administrative assistant for the Associated Negro Press, writes to Dr. King regarding his four "My Dream" columns. Enclosed in the letter is a copy of each column. Dr. King writes on a variety of topics such as social justice, equality, nonviolence and the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Thomas Price to MLK

Thursday, October 8, 1964

Major Thomas Price, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance in retaining his commission and active duty service with the United States Army.

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Thursday, February 4, 1965

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

The Danger of Misguided Goodness

Under the title, "The Danger of Misguided Goodness," the central message in these sermon notes is the need for all individuals to be morally conscientious.

Recommendations Made to Executive Board of Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, May 24, 1956

Dr. King makes recommendations to the Executive Board of Montgomery Improvement Association. He suggests developing a monthly newspaper to inform friends of the movement activity and scheduling weekly mass meetings.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe, associate of literary agent Joan Daves, encloses royalties for Dr. King's French edition of "Strength to Love".