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God's Relation to the World

Dr. King outlines the sermon "God's Relation to the World." Dr. King breaks down the sermon into three themes: God's creation of the world, His conservation of the world, and His transformation of the world.

Letter from Addele Dunn to MLK

Sunday, January 30, 1966

Mrs. Dunn writes Dr. King describing her living conditions in the south side of Chicago. Dr. King is currently in Chicago advocating for the citizens of the city.

Black Power

This flyer gives a description of what black power entails.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Warren Chippindale

Wednesday, July 27, 1966

Dr. King writes to respond to Mr. Chippindale's invitation to have Dr. King speak in Montreal. He states that due to prior engagements, he will not be able to accept the invitation.

Note from Will Dale to MLK

Will Dale writes Dr. King commending him for encouraging Black athletes to boycott the Olympic games.

The American Dream Outline

Dr. King outlines his "American Dream" speech on the back of letterhead from the Bellevue Stafford hotel. Dr. King writes about a "massive action program" to address injustice in America.

God in the Book of Psalms

Dr. King references Bible verse Psalm 71:19. He outlines why the idea of a finite God is incongruent with the "theistic absolutism" found in the Old Testament.

Minutes of National Action Council Meeting

Sunday, July 1, 1962

The National Action Council, a sector of the Congress of Racial Equality, hosts a regional meeting in Miami, Florida where they will vote on council member positions, as well as regional and national NAC meeting logistics.

Letter from MLK to Beulah H. Brunson

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Beulah H. Brunson of the Georgiana Thomas Grand Chapter O. E. S. for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King comments on the progress made over the past decade in improving conditions for Negroes in the South.

Notecard Listing Various Scriptures from Isaiah

Dr. King lists numerous scriptures from the Old Testament book of Isaiah related to the topics of righteous living, anger and sin.

Telegram from Curtis W. Harris to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 5, 1965

Curtis Harris, President of the Virginia State unit of the SCLC, asks Miss McDonald to confirm some scheduled dates that have been previously discussed with Dr. King.

Society

Dr. King quotes a statement from Charles H. Cooley's "The Social Process," in which Cooley defines society as a living, unified group of processes.

Temple Sholom Bulletin

Saturday, September 19, 1964

This issue of the Temple Shalom Bulletin highlights Dr. King and his accomplishments during the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dick Smyth

Tuesday, March 26, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dick Smyth that Dr. King is unable to accept the speaking engagement at the moment but they will contact him once Dr. King has an engagement in the area.

Letter from Mrs. Berdeax to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Mrs. Berdeax of Ohio informs Dr. King that she supports his position on the war in Vietnam and is ashamed of her country.

Letter from Ms. Dorothy Clark to Rev. Abernathy

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this letter accompanying a contribution, Ms. Clark expresses her condolences after Dr. King's assassination and pledges her personal support in continuing his mission.

Transition Period

Dr. King quotes an unknown source that links the transition period to Alfred North Whitehead’s rejection of his earlier view about science and philosophy.

SCLC Annual Meeting Program

Tuesday, September 25, 1962

This program outlines an annual meeting for the SCLC. The guest list includes Hall of Fame player Jackie Robinson, Septima Clark and Joseph E. Lowery.

Robert F. Thorne's Response to the SCLC

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Robert F. Thorne expresses his commitment to the civil rights cause, but will discontinue his financial contributions to the SCLC due to Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

Latitudinarianism

Dr. King defines latitudinarianism, a term "applied to a liberal opinion which allows the diversity of opinion."

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Sunday, March 3, 1963

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

Letter from Vernal G. Cave to MLK

Thursday, November 21, 1963

Vernal G. Cave informs Dr. King of a cousin's passing and contributes to the SCLC in his memory.

Letter from Alberta Brown to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

The Adah Grand Chapter write Dr. King regarding an enclosed check for the SCLC.

Letter from Jan Helge Jansen to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

The Norwegian Student Association invites Dr. King to speak at one of their meetings and suggest the topic of his lecture be human rights and freedom.

Letter from Melvin W. Trent to Dr. King

An individual desiring to remain anonymous, writes Dr. King expressing his concern with employment discrimination and his belief that Dr. King can change things.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Herman Strase

Thursday, October 28, 1965

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Strase position on justice for all. More specifically, he praises Strase for his written sentiments concerning apartheid policies of the Union of South Africa government.

Draft Letter from MLK to Donald DuMont

This draft by Dr. King addresses the goals and similarities of the SCLC with Christian principles. He asserts that the aims of the SCLC "...are [to] work to provide those same basic needs for all men."

Letter from Ruth W. Carr to SCLC

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Ruth W. Carr gives a donation of $350.00 on behalf of her late husband, Clarence Carr. Mrs. Carr explains that it was her husband wish before death to contribute to the work of the SCLC.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

An Ambitious Dream Confronts Reality

Wednesday, June 23, 1965

Dr. King talks about the Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE) as well as the political changes that have occurred in Georgia.