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Letter from Steve Allen to MLK

Tuesday, March 1, 1966
California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Allen forwards Dr. King a letter from Paul C. Hosfeldt in which Mr. Hosfeldt calls Dr. King a Communist. Mr. Allen believes that this letter will be of interest to Dr. King and his attorneys.

Letter from Richard Tucker and Stanford Ovshinsky to Lyndon Johnson

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

The Oakland County (Michigan) Peace Committee, believing U.S. involvement in Vietnam is a mistake, asks President Johnson and government representatives to stop bombing North Vietnam, promote a bilateral ceasefire, and enter multilateral negotiations.

Letter from A.M. Davis to Mr. James Parham Regarding Emory Case

Monday, October 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

A. M. Davis, President of the NAACP's Atlanta Branch, wrote this letter as part of an Atlanta Medical Association complaint against Emory University.

"Danger in Demonstrations"

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), Selma, AL

This article, from the newspaper "Chicago's American," criticizes Dr. King's demonstrations on open housing in Chicago.

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962
New York, NY

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

Letter from Thomas G. Carson to MLK

Thursday, August 24, 1967
North Carolina (NC)

Thomas G. Carson writes Dr. King as a white supporter of civil rights legislation, but fed-up with what he feels are the changing views of Dr. King and the riots "committed by Negroes in the name of civil rights."

Letter from Glenn T. Izutsu to MLK

Friday, November 6, 1964
Hawaii (HI)

Mr. Izutsu, President of the Associated Students of the University of Hawaii, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize and recalls a visit by Dr. King earlier in the year.

Symbolic Mountains

New York, NY, New York (NY)

On the stationary of the Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York, Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Symbolic Mountains." These include the mountains of ethical relations, practical materialism, indifference concerning poverty, and racial segregation.

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Speech to National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, South Africa, CONGO / ZAIRE

Dr. King answers a number of questions from the National Press Club.

Thank You Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays former president of Morehouse College thanks Dr. King for his Founders' Day contribution.

Letter from P. D. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Johannesburg, South Africa, New York (NY)

P. D. Thompson, a member of the South African Institute of Race Relations, writes to Dr. King seeking help with South Africa's race relations.

Letter from M. R. Cherry to MLK

Friday, September 16, 1966
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

M. R. Cherry, Dean of the School of Theology of Acadia University, writes Dr. King on behalf of the University inviting him to deliver the Hayward Lectures.

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

Letter from MLK to Brigitte Kirch of Germany

Wednesday, November 13, 1963
GERMANY

Dr. King thanks Brigitte Kirch for her encouraging letter.

Immaculate Conception

Dr. King reflects on the birth of Christ and the fact that Mary was "kept free from original sin."

Rutgers Professor Liberties Advocate

Thursday, August 18, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Mississippi (MS)

Arthur Kinoy, a civil rights lawyer, was arrested in House Un-American Activities Committee hearings. During the few minutes he was in jail, Kinoy spent his time offering free advice to the other inmates.

Letter from John Askins to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Detroit, MI

John Askins requests that Dr. King correct the transcription of an earlier interview for publishing purposes.

A Statement to the South and Nation

Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Thursday, December 19, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Florida (FL)

In this letter to Dr. Mays, Dr. King mentions a letter of recommendation written on the behalf of William Herbert Gray Jr.

Letter from Annis Pratt to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Professor Annis Pratt of Spelman College writes about her support for the proposed Poor People's Campaign. She suggests that the problems traditionally associated with race may be more economic in nature, and encloses a check from her husband and herself for the march.

Letter to MLK from G. Houghton

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Houghton writes to Dr. King with a plan for SABON (Saving and Building Organization of, by, and for the Negroes).

Letter from Jacques Muhlethaler to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967
Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM

The EIP, an association which seeks to establish the greatest number of schools in the world, asks Dr. King to become a member of their Board of Patrons.

Quote from AFL-CIO President George Meany

New Jersey (NJ)

This is a picture of George Meany, President of AFL-CIO, giving an address to the Jewish Labor Committee meeting in Atlantic City, NJ on March 26, 1960. The picture is inscribed with a quote which reads: "What we want for ourselves, we want for all humanity."

Letter from Mrs. Zabelle Tourian to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL)

Zabelle Tourian expresses her support for Dr. King, relaying several short statements regarding famous African American persons of recent history.

Letter from T.J. Morrow to MLK

Monday, July 5, 1965
NEW ZEALAND, New York (NY)

T.J. Morrow writes Dr. King in an effort to gain support for his film idea. Having already submitted it to a motion picture company and subsequently denied, Morrow hopes that King can help with promotion. He believes the film can offer positive messages of brotherhood and feels confident in its impact on society.

Letter from Pastor F. Peter Sabey to MLK

Monday, April 26, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

Pastor F. Peter Sabey of the Lafayette College Church invites Dr. King to give a sermon at the church. Sabey states that he will cover the expenses for Dr. King and give an honorarium if he accepts.

Progress

Dr. King notes and comments on a quote from James H. Robinson's "The New History" on the eternal law of progress.

Telegram from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1960
New York, NY, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

A. Phillip Randolph, on behalf of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and the Negro American Labor Council, expresses joy at Dr. King's release from prison.

Thank-U-Gram from Rev. Phil Stovin to MLK and Harold E. Stassen

Saturday, February 24, 1968
Milwaukee, WI

Rev. Phil Stovin extends his support to Harold E. Stassen and Dr. King for organizing Write-In votes in the 1968 Presidential Election.