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Out of the Long Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958

Missions Magazine published various articles concerning the baptist ministry and how the church is impacting its surrounding community. Dr. King contributed to the magazine by writing an article entitled "Out of the Long Night of Segregation." In the article, he writes about the nonviolent methods being used to end segregation in America.

Holy Week Service

Wednesday, April 18, 1962

This Holy Week Service program for Augustana Lutheran Church highlights Dr. King as a guest preacher where he delivers a sermon entitled "Remember Who You Are." The program goes on to detail Good Friday and Easter Sunday Services, as well as informing readers of Dr. King's television interview.

Religion

Dr. King cites Edward S. Ames' beliefs regarding religion.

Letter from Jodi Moses to MLK about TAC Rally

Thursday, May 26, 1966

The Community Relations Committee of the Tenant's Action Council (TAC) writes this letter to Dr. King asking him to speak at a rally being held at the Olivet Community Presbyterian Church in Chicago, Illinois.

Jesus Christ (good will)

Dr. King references H. Richard Niebuhr's statement, "Christ is the Rosetta Stone of Christianity." He also talks about archaeological discoveries and translating languages.

Letter from MLK to Jimmy Edward

Monday, September 14, 1964

Dr. King acknowledges receipt of Mr. Jimmy Edwards' letter with the kind words concerning his book, "Strength To Love."

God

Dr. King records his thoughts on the book of Deuteronomy to illustrate the oneness of God.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

Thursday, December 15, 1966

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

Letter from Preston Smith to MLK

Wednesday, June 6, 1962

Preston Smith of the Program Committee of Zion Baptist Church inquires if Dr. King can speak to the people of Parkersburg, West Virginia.

Forgiveness

Dr. King gives examples of what it means to forgive. Among other definitions, forgiveness means "that the past is overlooked" and that there is "a renewal of higher fellowship."

Letter from Johnnie Jones to MLK

Mr. Jones requests that Dr. King send $54.00 to his home to help with his bills. Mr. Jones also requests that Dr. King consider him for painting services.

Christianity

Dr. King quotes from Nietzsche's "The AntiChrist."

Letter from SNCC's Judy Richardson to Coretta Scott King

Sunday, September 5, 1965

Judy Richardson of SNCC writes to Mrs. King to give her a copy of the new Negro history primer, "Negroes in American History." The book serves as a method of teaching children about African American history while tying in elements of the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.

Tidewater Youth Association Invites MLK to Speak

Saturday, March 30, 1963

Edwin Crocker, president of the Tidewater Youth Association, Inc. in Portsmouth, Virginia informs Dr. King of an interest to present him as their forum speaker. A student initiative, the organization strives to improve social, economic, and spiritual conditions of the Negro. The group hopes Dr. King will consider helping the youth fight for racial justice and equality.

Dr. King Notecard

In this notecard, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoint pertaining to the doctrine of "Puritanism."

Letter from MLK to Art Simmons

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King extends his gratitude to Mr. Simmons for the evening at the Palais des Sports.

Man (His Need for God)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Augustine's Theory of Knowledge

Dr. King discusses St. Augustine's Theory of Knowledge. According to Augustine, "sense knowledge is the lowest level of knowledge."

The Business Card of the Honorable Al Shabazz (Malcolm X)

During the late 1950s, Malcolm X began going by Malik Al-Shabazz. Shabazz, according to the Nation of Islam, was a Black Nation in central Africa from which all human beings descended. While the date of this card is unknown, it is presumed to be circa the late 1950s to early 1960s, before Malcolm X split from the Nation of Islam in 1964.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Postcard from Frank J. Meinen to the SCLC

Sunday, April 8, 1962

Upon recently hearing Dr. King speak, Frank J. Meinen writes the SCLC to ask how he can help.

Letter from MLK to Arthur Stanley

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Dr. King thanks Arthur Stanley for raising funds to defray the salary expenses for David Wallace. He also expresses delight that Mr. Stanley will be attending the Operation Breadbasket meeting.

Letter to Joan Daves to Philip Hanson

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Here Mr. Hanson conveys his appreciation for the permission to include words from Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", in his performance "The Rebels".

Wisdom

Here Dr. King quotes Proverbs 8:22-23 and sketches his view that "Wisdom was created by God before the earth was created, and it aids him [sic] [in] the creative process."

Letter from Ronald Kessebring to SCLC

Friday, March 30, 1962

Ronald Kessebring sends a contribution along with a letter of support to the SCLC. As a former resident of Atlanta, Mr. Kessebring witnessed what the organization provided for the community and the country at large.

Letter from James Huger to MLK Regarding Recent Visit

Monday, January 15, 1968

Mr. Huger, City Commissioner of Dayton Beach, Florida, informs Dr. King how much he enjoyed a recent visit to Ebenezer, and wishes Dr. King good health and success.

Letter from Congressman James Roosevelt to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Representative James Roosevelt thanks Dr. King for his words regarding Roosevelt's contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Resolution of the SCLC Board of Directors

Thursday, August 11, 1966

The SCLC Board of Directors issues a resolution at its Tenth Annual Convention that lists what it considers "flagrant injustices" which violate the rights of American workers. As part of the resolution, the SCLC requests that Congress make corrections to the National Labor Relations Act.

Telegram from Mary Gregory to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

In this telegram, Mary Gregory, President of the Frederick Douglass Association, informed Dr. King of their rededicated efforts to the movement, during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.