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Letter from MLK to Private Freddie J. Friend

Sunday, February 25, 1962
New York (NY)

Responding to a letter dated February 8th, which made claims of mistreatment, Dr. King responds to Private Friend with a proposed solution to his problem.

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

God's Omniscience

Dr. King references the Biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's omniscience. King notes that God knows everything before it is even done. This, however, does not have an effect on human free will.

Letter from Marie L. Jones Regarding Reverend Ashton Jones

Wednesday, September 25, 1963
Cleveland, OH, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Mary L. Jones sent out this letter reporting on the plight of her husband, Reverend Ashton Jones, who was arrested in July of 1963 for attempting to lead an interracial student group into a service at the segregated First Baptist Church of Atlanta. Reverend Jones was sentenced to a year in the Georgia state prison and six months of hard labor for the crime of "disturbing a worship service." Mrs. Jones encourages readers of her letter to heed the advice of British social critic Bertrand Russell, by writing an "avalanche of letters" to those responsible.

Promotional Article for Why We Can't Wait

Birmingham, AL

This Harper released publication contains a preview of the religious books to be published in the summer and fall of 1964. Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" is featured with the byline "The 'Man of the Year' writes the 'Book of the Year'."

Letter from David W. Letts to the S.C.L.C.

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Cleveland, OH

This letter, coupled with a donation, was sent from Baldwin-Wallace College to the S.C.L.C following Dr. King's assassination. The writer discusses the initiation of student activism that was taking place at the college in response to Dr. King's tragic death.

Letter from Joseph McKinney to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Reverend Lee Wright invites Dr. King to speak at the Annual Spring Membership Campaign for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Wheeling Branch in West Virginia.

Trinitarianism

Dr. King discusses the doctrine trinitarianism, the belief that God is one being, existing in three equal persons.

God

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's statement that there is no "medium point" as it relates to God.

Letter from Larry M. Otter & Alan Aftanski to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968
Maryland (MD)

Mount Saint Mary's College's Young Democratic and Young Republican Clubs inform Dr. King of their preparation for the National Collegiate Primary, Choice '68. Dr. King has been named a candidate in the mock election, so the organizers request information about his views. They also tell Dr. King that a speaking engagement can be arranged if Dr. King's schedule brings him to the Maryland area.

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966
London, England, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

Progressives to Face Important Issues in Birmingham

Monday, October 31, 1966
Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), North Carolina (NC), Cincinnati, OH, Memphis, TN, Missouri (MO), Birmingham, AL

This news release details a meeting of the Progressive National Baptist Convention's Southern Regional in Birmingham, Alabama. Reverend Martin King, Sr. is one of the many pastors participating.

Letter from Mrs. Catherine Hartman to MLK about a New Publication

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

In this letter Mrs. Catherine Hartman of Atheneum Publishers sends Dr. King a new publication, asking that Dr. King read it and offer any comments.

King and SCLC Meet in Montgomery

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

This press release announces a mass meeting held in Montgomery, Alabama by the Executive Board of SCLC. The meeting was held in response to a major libel suit against four prominent SCLC officials. Dr. King gives an address to boost morale during the course of this suit. In Dr. King's view, "The South has lost its solidity. Whites fight against whites over desegregation. Be it known, evil cannot permanently organize itself." The libel suit came to be known as the New York Times Company vs. Sullivan (1960).

Letter from William Ferguson to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Texas (TX)

William Ferguson of Prairie View, Texas extends an invitation for Dr. King to address the community. The community of Prairie View is engaged in a multiracial boycott with the aid of many white ministers. They seek Dr. King's appearance to give vitality to their movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Arvella Gray

Monday, June 3, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dora McDonald acknowledges receipt of items sent by Arvella Gray. She ensures Mr. Gray that Dr. King will be made aware of the gifts upon his return from Birmingham.

Letter from Vivian Dilday to MLK

Friday, October 27, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday writes Dr. King on behalf of the Committee on Benevolences of The Riverside Church in New York. Enclosed with the letter is a $1,000 check for the SCLC.

Atlanta Dinner Honoring MLK Nobel Peace Prize

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA

The Citizens of Atlanta host a "recognition dinner" honoring Dr. King as the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize recipient. This document is an autographed copy of the dinner program.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, EGYPT, HUNGARY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, NETHERLANDS, FRANCE, INDONESIA, INDIA, PAKISTAN, Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New York, NY, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, Washington (WA), CANADA, Colorado (CO), New Hampshire (NH), Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

History: Ecclesiastes

Dr. King examines the "author's philosophy of history" recorded in the biblical text Ecclesiastes 1:9. He notes that Ecclesiastes' view of history as "a series of endless cycles which has no underlying theology" is in stark contrast to general Bible philosophy, and is more in line with a Greek view of history.

Telegram from James S. Symington to MLK

California (CA), Texas (TX), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA

James S. Symington of the U.S. Department of State invites Dr. King to meet with Prime Minister Forbes Burham of Guyana. Symington provides Dr. King with the Prime Minister's itinerary for California and Texas.

Letter from MLK to William Proxmire

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks William Proxmire for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from The Canadian Council of Christians and Jews to MLK

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
CANADA

National Executive Director Richard Jones invites Dr. King to speak in Toronto during the celebration of Canada's centennial birthday. Jones describes current racial relations and acknowledges that the centennial events could be used to spur "advances toward complete equality."

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967
Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, THAILAND

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Mrs. R. E. Rufenacht to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968
Arizona (AZ)

Mrs. Rufenacht thanks Dr. King for his support of white workers who requested his help. She also encloses a contribution for the work of the SCLC.

Anti-Poverty Bill

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

This document outlines and provides the status of the Anti-Poverty legislation in Congress.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, Memphis, TN, WESTERN SAHARA, Tennessee (TN), South Africa

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

MLK Note

New York (NY)

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Birthday Card From Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.