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Letter from MLK to Joyce Armstrong

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to Joyce Armstrong, a student at Central High School, regarding her concerns on equality. Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation and states, "it is gratifying to us to know that so many young people are dedicated to the cause of Freedom."

Telegram from Congressman Seymour Halpern to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965

In this telegram to Dr. King in Selma jail, Congressman Seymour Halpern expresses his regret that he is unable to travel to Mississippi.

Letter from Michael Bennett to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

In this letter, Mr.Michael Bennett expresses how delighted the NAACP is knowing Dr. King will lecture on Kent State University's campus.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

Letter from Anonymous to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

The author of this letter expresses their concern about poverty across the United States and offers suggestions for Negros to build their own communities.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Kennedy

Thursday, January 25, 1962

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding the safety of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth during his 90 day jail sentence.

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and expresses her love for him.

Letter from MLK and Associates to Mr. Grover Hall

Friday, January 11, 1957

Dr. King and associates write to Grover Hall, Editor of the Montgomery Advertiser, to express appreciation for an article the publication carried. The clergymen state that "law and order can be restored" if other periodicals throughout the South follow the newspaper's example.

Burn Baby Burn: Problems of the Urban Ghetto

This letter from the Georgia Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union announces a cocktail reception for Aryeh Neier at the Wit's End.

Recommendations to Committee on Future Program

Tuesday, October 27, 1959

Dr. King outlines several initiatives of the SCLC and other civil rights leaders.

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

Letter from Mrs. Phyllis Nissel to MLK

Phyllis Nissel congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She remembers hearing his speech at the March on Washington and appreciates Dr. King's ability to represent the voices of so many.

The Role of the Church

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Eleanor S. Greve to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Eleanor Greve writes Dr. King to express the encouragement and inspiration she and her husband felt while reading a portion of Dr. King's speech in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The speech was given before the Chicago Area Committee for a Sane Nuclear policy.

Telegram from SCLC to Miss Geneva Jones

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

The SCLC writes Miss Geneva Jones providing her information on their traveling agenda for a trip to McIntosh, Georgia.

Memorandum from William Rutherford to Staff Members

Friday, December 29, 1967

William Rutherford, Executive Director of SCLC, sends a memorandum to the staff informing them of a program entitled "Poverty in Mississippi," which is being broadcast on Channel UHF in the Atlanta area on January 7, 1968.

Sin

Dr. King notes that Genesis 5:24, 6:9 and 6:22 make it clear that sin is not universal.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Silas Norman of SNCC

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Silas Norman of SNCC to explain that Dr. King is currently touring several cities on the People-to-People tour and will be presiding over the SCLC convention. She informs him that his letter will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return.

Letter from Mary Eunice to MLK

Saturday, June 13, 1964

Mary Eunice writes Dr. King offering her appreciation for the program he held in San Diego, California. Ms. Eunice notifies Dr. King that she will send him pictures from the program.

Statement Concerning Skin Color Differences

The author expounds on the color differences of eyes, plants, and animals to identify the faulty logic of bigotry in America.

A Southern Point of View

Eliza Paschall writes this article to express her feelings toward the Georgia legislature's willingness to close down the schools rather than integrate them. Paschall states that "segregation is a disease that infects all parts of a being, human or political." The time for action is now, so that equality can be achieved by all.

Letter from LeRoy Collins of the U.S. Department of Commerce

The Director of Communtiy Relations Service for the U.S. Department of Commerce, LeRoy Collins, offers their partnership and support to the National Assembly on Progress in Eaquality of Opportunity in Housing and the National College Student Conference on Freedom of Residence. Each conference addresses the issue of discrimination; inequalitiesof residence and citizenship at the community level.

Mind

Dr. King writes on Herbert Spencer's interpretation of the mind.

Letter from Harper & Brothers to MLK

Friday, October 10, 1958

Eugene Exman sends Dr. King a review of "Stride Toward Freedom" from the New York Times. He also mentions recent orders for the book and planned efforts to increase sales.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

Dr. King Notecard

In this notecard, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoint pertaining to the doctrine of "Puritanism."

Angels

Dr. King writes on angels, according to Daniel 10:13, 21, and 12:1.

Monarchianism

Dr. King defines the doctrine monarchianism as "a doctrine stressing the unity of the Godhead as against the ultimately prevailing tendency to affirm personal distinctions within the Godhead."

Cosomological Argument for God

Dr. King references the cosmological argument for God.

Eternal Objects

Dr. King cites Alfred North Whitehead's book "Science and the Modern World."