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Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe, associate of literary agent Joan Daves, encloses royalties for Dr. King's French edition of "Strength to Love".

God's Omniscience

Dr. King references the Biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's omniscience. King notes that God knows everything before it is even done. This, however, does not have an effect on human free will.

Who They are and Why They Struck

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood

Monday, April 8, 1968

This is the itinerary for the Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood to Dr. King's funeral site. A group of bereaved citizens from Northeast Atlanta organized this walk to express human solidarity.

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

Invitation from the United Federation of Teachers to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

The United Federation of Teachers invite Dr. King to their annual Spring Conference Luncheon. At this particular event, civil rights activist Bayard Rustin will be honored with the John Dewey Award.

Invitation to John F. Kennedy Funeral

Saturday, November 23, 1963

This telegram sent from The White House in Washington, invites Dr. King to participate in the funeral services for President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Friday, November 4, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe encloses British royalties for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom."

Appreciation Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

In this letter, Maurice Dawkins expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's statement that encouraged the Congress to support the war on poverty. He also expresses appreciation for Dr. King making the urgency of this matter clear to the world.

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Saturday, March 1, 1958

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

Dr. King Sermon Rough Draft - "Man Incurably Religious"

The document, shown here, is a rough draft of sermon notes, prepared by Dr. King, under the title "Man Incurably Religious." The exact timeframe, of this sermon draft, is unknown. Dr. King, in this draft, puts the spotlight on examples such as a baby's attachment to a mother, a flower's direction toward the sun and the flight pattern of a pigeon. He used a quotation of St. Augustine that said, "We come forth from God and we shall be homesick until we return to him."

God (His Existence: Psalms)

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's existence.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Tuesday, October 10, 1967

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

Letter from Floyd Mulkey to MLK

Saturday, December 16, 1967

Floyd Mulkey writes Dr. King a letter, commending him on his plans for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

Letter from Rev. Oliver W. Holmes to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 23, 1964

Reverend Oliver Holmes confirms the possibility of a meeting between Dr. King and Mrs. Leonard Faber, a graduate student in religion. Her dissertation involves Dr. King, German monk and theologian Martin Luther and Jewish philosopher Martin Buber.

Letter from Walter W. Windisch to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

Walter W. Windisch writes to Dr. King to express his gratitude for the Peace March led by Dr. King in New York City. He also expresses his desire to be a part of any upcoming demonstrations.

Letter from Reverend Durstan R. McDonald to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Friday, March 15, 1968

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges have brought influential leaders to their campus from the civil rights and black power movements. Many students desire a further understanding of the Gospel and have requested to invite Dr. King to speak. The dates provided for this engagement are unfortunately subsequent to the assignation of Dr. King.

Letter from Stephen Siteman to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

In this letter to Dr. King, Stephen Siteman encloses a letter that Norman Thomas wrote for the New York Times.

Letter from William Kunstler to Arthur Shores

Friday, March 9, 1962

Attorney William Kunstler writes to Arthur Shores about a legal case involving Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Harry Belafonte expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. King for appearing with him on the "Tonight Show." Harry Belafonte concludes by thanking Dr. King for his friendship and for giving his time so generously.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

Letter from Orville Freeman to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

The author informs Dr. King of the efforts being made to adequately address the issues pertaining to nutritional health in the country.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Casper I. Glenn

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King writes to Rev. Glenn, President of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, regarding Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech. Dr. King informs him that the Motown Record Corporation has been granted rights of this speech.

Letter from MLK to David J. Walker

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Junior Board of Trade to speak in Toronto.

Letter from Lloyd Wilson to Roy Wilkins

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Lloyd Wilson affirms his support for Dr. King, but he cannot agree with Dr. King's recent statements concerning the Vietnam War. He lists a series of questions hoping to gain clarity from Dr. King or Mr. Wilkins.

Telegram from Mr. David Susskind to MLK

In this telegram, Mr. Susskind invites Dr. King to participate in a "'Open End' two hour debate with Governor George Wallace."

Letter from Ryan & Ebert Law Firm to the SCLC about Will of Carl A. Ryan

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

In this letter to Dr. King and the SCLC, the Executives of the Ryan, Ryan & Ebert Law Firm reward the organization with a check for $960.00 on behalf of the last Will and Testament of Carl A. Ryan

Telegram from Elizabeth Polste to MLK

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Mrs. Polste writes to Dr. King requesting a tribute for Emily Greene, who is also a Noble Peace Laureate and a founder of the Womens International League for Peace and Freedom.