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Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Note from Mrs. Phyllis J. Sundquist to MLK

Mrs. Phyllis Sundquist encourages Dr. King to continue his stance against the Vietnam War for the betterment of the United States.

The Christian Way of Life in Human Relations

Wednesday, December 4, 1957

Dr. King makes a speech to the National Council of Churches regarding the issue of American race relations. After school integration ... has noticed a radical change in the attitudes of African-Americans, ultimately giving birth to this mental and figurative notion of the "new Negro". He solicits the assistance and leadership of the nation's churches to take a firm stand against the rampant inequalities afflicting blacks are facing in America.

Letter from John A. Race to MLK

Thursday, January 21, 1965

Congressman Race of Wisconsin thanks Dr. King for his letter concerning the seating of the Mississippi Delegates. Race seems to suggest that he was of the majority who "did authorize their formal acceptance" although he states that he was in the "minority."

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

Letter from Bonnie Scott to MLK

Bonnie Scott, a student at Lake Forest College, sends Dr. King a letter asking him for his bibliography as well as information about nonviolence for their senior thesis.

Letter from MLK to Rev. M. L. Shepard, Sr.

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. M. L. Shepard for his "generous gift." Dr. King stresses the importance of support from friends like Rev. Shepard for the survival of SCLC. He also informs Rev. Shepard that he will receive material from the SCLC to update his congregation on the progress of work in the South.

The Church Says No on Proposition 14

Thie Council of Churches in Northern and Southern California argues against the goals of Proposition 14. This 1964 ballot proposition sought to amend the California consitution by nullifying the Rumford Fair Housing Act. Prop 14 would go on to pass, but two years later the California Supreme Court deemed it unconstitutional.

Telegram from Mark O. Hatfield to MLK

Mark Hatfield declines an invitation from Dr. King due to other commitments.

Letter from E. J. Moorer to Dr. King

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

E. J. Moorer of the Alabama Young Democratic Congress asks Dr. King to speak at one of their events.

Letter from Robert L. Tucker Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Robert Tucker inquires about Dr. King's views on Adam Clayton Powell and his position in Washington. Tucker states that he has great respect for Dr. King, which is why he wants clarity on his sentiments regarding the Powell controversy.

Niebuhr (Christ)

Dr. King writes on Niebuhr's perception of Christ.

Letter from MLK to a Young John Lewis

Tuesday, March 5, 1963

Dr. King writes John Lewis, the future activist and U.S. Congressman, to thank him for a previous letter and to offer financial assistance. He discusses the possibility of Mr. Lewis joining his staff in Alabama.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Wachtel

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Ms. McDonald sends Mr. Wachtel Dr. King's schedules for visiting Oslo, Norway. Dr. King is traveling to Norway to receive his Nobel Peace Prize.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Letter from Linda Witt to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Linda Witt, who is conducting research for a school project, asks Dr. King questions about his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Monday, June 17, 1963

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Letter from Edwin Berry to Jane Lee J. Eddy

Friday, November 18, 1966

Edwin Berry, Executive Director of the Chicago Urban League, writes Jane Lee Eddy, Secretary of the Taconic Foundation, to request funding for a "get-out-the-vote campaign" in Chicago.

SCLC Mail Log: March 4, 1968

Monday, March 4, 1968

This mail log lists the names of people and organizations sending correspondences to several SCLC staff members.

Black Out: Dress Rehearsal for the Revolution

Kenneth Goff warns about the potential race riots predicted in a Communist manual.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Johnson

Dr. King responds to Mr. Johnson's request for a recommendation by writing that he is honored by the request, but he does not believe that he can write a proper recommendation given the absence of their acquaintance. Dr. King makes suggestions for alternative recommendations and offers his "encouragement and support."

Selfishness

Dr. King cites Schopenhauer's book "The World as Will and Ideas" and records a passage on selfishness.

Letter from Esther Davey to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

Esther Davey writes Dr. King in support of his crusade. She expresses her dismay in some of Dr. King's speeches made after the march from Selma, Alabama and stresses the importance of Christianity in his crusade.

Tenth Annual Institute of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 9, 1965

This program for the Tenth Annual Institute of the Montgomery Improvement Association gives a detailed history of the organization's events from 1955 to 1965. "Highlights At A Glance" include: accounts of violence and community bombings, school integration, freedom rides, The Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the establishment of the SCLC. Photographs of leadership, churches, voter registration, and marches appear throughout. This document also shows Dr. King's handwritten notes, copies of related news articles, and the individual programs for each day of the Institute.

Letter from Thomas Bradley to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Thomas Bradley, Los Angeles' Tenth District Councilman, requests Dr. King's support with a fundraising campaign.

Letter from Norman Taylor to MLK

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

Norman Taylor, an agent at Investment Bonds, Inc., commends Dr. King on his work and for being a man of integrity. He offers assistance to help improve the living conditions of the poor in the slums of Chicago.

News from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Thursday, February 9, 1961

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. announces their recent involvement with President John F. Kennedy.

The Synagogue Council of America

This pamphlet provides information on the Synagogue Council of America, including its goals and financing methods. The Council was formed to unite the orthodox, conservative and reform Jewish movements into a single group.

Letter from M. C. Chagla to MLK

On behalf of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations, the president, C. Chagla invites Dr. King to deliver the seventh series of Azad Memorial Lectures.