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Letter from Governor John Reynolds to MLK

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Governor Reynolds requests Dr. King to speak at a Conference on Civil Rights in celebration of the centennial year of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from Donald Keys to MLK

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

Donald F. Keys writes to Dr. King about Dr. King's invitation to speak at a planned Washington Mobilization on Vietnam. Keys also tells Dr. King that he may have to go to Africa at the time of the meeting, and requests that Mrs. King deliver his address in his absence.

Letter from Medora S. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Medora Bass, member of the Planned Parenthood Association in Philadelphia, invites Dr. King to speak at their annual luncheon. Bass states, "You would render a great service to the underprivileged in Philadelphia."

Man

Dr. King writes about man's estimation of finiteness and freedom.

God is a Spirit

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "God Is A Spirit" and lists three different meanings for that assertion.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Mendelson regarding I Have A Dream

Tuesday, November 2, 1965

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Cantor Mendelson that Dr. King is pleased to know that the Men's Club of Beth Sholom is interested in setting to music excerpts from "I Have a Dream." McDonald refers Mendelson to Clarence Jones, an attorney who handles such matters.

Telegram from John Conyers Jr. to MLK about a Meeting

In this telegram John Conyers, Jr. extends an invitation to Dr. King to attend a meeting for the discussion of black politics and related considerations. The meeting was to include Lerone Bennett, Julian Bond, Harry Belfonte, Richard Hatcher, Floyd McKissick, and Carl Stokes. Conyers also informs Dr. King of his itinerary and provides a number for him to be contacted.

Letter from O. L. Sherrill to Ralph David Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968

The Executive Secretary of the General Baptist State Convention of North Carolina requests multiple copies of the program from Dr. King's funeral service.

Letter From D. Parke Gibson to MLK

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

D. Parke Gibson informs Dr. King that they will be working with International Correspondence Schools. Gibson also feels that home study education could "lead to upgrading of many Negro workers."

Letter from Soma Ragir to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Soma Ragir extends her support for Dr. King's planned Poor People's March on Washington, but expresses her desire for heightened political organization in order to elect black congressional members who can ultimately "reform our social system."

Letter from MLK to Rev. John A. Clark

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Reverend Clark regarding the church's lax position on "racial justice and brotherhood among men." Although he cannot participate in Reverend Clark's suggested campaign, Dr. King encourages the minister to move forward with his plans of establishing a revival campaign to preach "the message of Our Lord at every opportunity."

Letter from Peggy Hutter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A white college student writes to Mrs. King, expressing her condolences and shock after the death of Dr. King.

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Saturday, July 10, 1965

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Sunday, August 6, 1967

William Kivi forwards Dr. King a copy of a postcard addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The correspondence alleges that the riots occuring in urban cities are a result of a economic stronghold to keep, in Kivi's view, "oppressing the oppressed." Kivi uses an example of California Governor Ronald Reagan's proposal to nix any federal program that supplements the War on Poverty.

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.

Letter from SNCC's Dorothy Miller to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1963

Dorothy Miller of SNCC writes Dr. King informing him of the arson attempt at the SNCC office and thanks him for a previous correspondence regarding the case of Bob Zellner.

Saturday Review: Behind the Selma March

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Dr. King describes the events surrounding the Selma-Montgomery Civil Rights March of 1965.

Letter from Dr. MLK to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church about a Contribution

Friday, February 9, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church in Stuanton, Virginia while explaining how such contributions help the SCLC and civil rights.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Mr. Exman writes to Dr. King to inform him that the Religious Book Club has chosen "Strength to Love" as a selection. Exman adds that 9,000 advance copies will be published despite concerns about the book's reception in the south.

King's Viet Stand Has Cost Him Some Financial Support

The Associated Press releases this article acknowledging the lack of funding forwarded to the SCLC because of Dr. King's views on Vietnam. The article also discusses how various other civil rights organizations have received more contributions based on the financial support drawn away from Dr. King. However, the article notes that Dr. King emphasizes the imperative link between the civil rights and peace movements.

Evil

Dr. King outlines Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus' insights on the question of evil.

Flyer Advertising SCLC Benefit

Harry Belafonte and his "entire company" host a full evening of entertainment for an SCLC benefit.

Greeks

Dr. King shares his personal insight on Greek and African "ability," relative to African-Americans.

Vote No on State Question 409 – Oklahoma NAACP

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders state their opinions regarding ballot question 409, the "right to work" law. All of the civil rights leaders encourage Negro readers to vote against passing his law because it will not benefit the Negro worker.

God (Malachi)

Dr. King writes notes regarding the prophet Malachi in the Old Testament of the Bible.

Faith As A Way of Knowing (Wieman)

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "The Source of Human Good" on faith as a way of knowing.

Letter from Helen Ramirez to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Helen Ramirez of The Brunswick Foundation informs Dr. King that they cannot donate to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Robert M. Ball to MLK

Monday, February 7, 1966

Mr.Ball, Social Security Administration Commissioner, invites Dr. King to participate in an information session concerning a proposed medicare program. The meeting will be held in Baltimore, MD.

The Black Revolution

This pamphlet produced by the SCLC is an excerpt from Thomas Merton's "The Black Revolution: Letters to a White Liberal." Merton seeks to awaken the conscience of white America by presenting the Negro perspective in the struggle for civil rights. He discusses how Dr. King utilizes the philosophy of nonviolence as a tool of progress and the contrasting reaction of Negros based upon their religious association as either Christian or Muslim. The concluding message is a call for the complete reform of America's social system which permits and breeds injustice.

September 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s secretary writes Joan Daves to inform her of his absence.

Friday, September 11, 1964

Dora McDonald, secretary to Dr. King, wrote Joan Daves to inform her that Dr. King will look into the request from Philip Unwin upon his return from Berlin.