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"Alabama (AL)"

Memorandum on direct Action in Alabama Cities

Dr. King writes a Direct Action plan for the Alabama cities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery. He believes that these cities need to focus on the emergence of violence and recommends the integration of Negroes into the police force.

MLK's Reply to Invitation to Speak at Centennial United Church

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Dr. King regrets to inform Reverend William Morris that due to his busy schedule and previous inability to work directly with the civil rights struggle, he can not accept the invitation to speak at Centennial United Church.

Letter to MLK from Moynihan about Invitation to Conference

Monday, March 27, 1967

A formal letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of MIT and Harvard University invites Dr. King to a Conference on Social Statistics and the City at Executive House in Washington, DC, June 22 and 23, 1967. Signed by Director Daniel P. Moynihan, the correspondence cites the inadequacy of the 1960 US census in enumerating the Negro, Puerto Rican, and Mexican populations, a concern about the impact on voting rights, and the need for better enumeration in the 1970 census.

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

Birmingham Manifesto

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

Category Time

Dr. King outlines Paul Tillich's view on time.

Evil

Dr. King outlines his views on evil and categorizes it into three types.

Letter from Jagdish Bhatt to MLK

Tuesday, November 9, 1965

South African resident Jagdish Bhatt writes Dr. King requesting an autograph picture of Dr. King. Bhatt notes that he has also collected other forms of memorabilia of Dr. King such as speeches and various recordings.

Letter from MLK to George Bass

Friday, June 17, 1966

Dr. King responds to Mrs. George Bass' recent letter inviting him to speak at the annual convention of the Planned Parenthood Association. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation because his schedule is booked for the entire month of January.

Letter from Frederick B. Hewitt to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Rev. Hewitt, pastor of the Grace United Church in Gananoque, Ontario, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He also extends an invitation to Dr. King to vacation with his family at Half Moon Bay.

Royalty Statement for Strength To Love

This financial document from Joan Daves, an agent of Harper & Row in New York City, references an itemized Royalty statement for Dr. King's book, "Strength To Love."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Book Autographs

Friday, August 28, 1964

With this letter Joan Daves sends three copies of "Why We Cant Wait" to Ms. McDonald requesting them to be autographed by Dr. King and returned to the specified recipients.

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

SCLC Flyer: Going Out of Business

The Fort Worth chapter of the SCLC issued this flyer advising its fellow Negro residents to boycott Bill Sodd's Meat Store because of discrimination.

Letter of Recommendation for Sally Cantor

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Mrs. W. M. Taylor, an English teacher at Grady High School, writes a letter of recommendation on behalf of Sally Cantor, a Russell H. Bull Scholarship applicant.

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

Letter from Joan Daves to Pierre Servais

Friday, November 20, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Pierre Servais in Belgium, thanking him for requesting the presence of Dr. King at the launching of a new edition of Strength to Love. She informs Mr. Servais that Dr. King's itinerary has not yet been set and that he will receive more information at a later date.

Telegram from Dr. K.O. Mbadiwe to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Dr. Nbadiwe requests a meeting with Dr. King regarding a new proposal for the Nigeria-Biafra situation. After two coups earlier that year in Nigeria, Biafra seceded and civil war erupted.

What Are We Fighting For?

This outlines the sermon "What Are We Fighting For" into three components: the past, the present, and the future.

Letter from Mrs. Frances Pauley to Albany Residents

Monday, July 30, 1962

Mrs. Pauley provides a call to action amidst the troubles in Georgia so that everyone can participate to resolve the troubles.

Contribution Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

A Department of State Agency for International Development summer intern expresses his support for SCLC. He offers a small contribution to the Atlanta-based foundation.

Letter from Martha Johnson to MLK

Thursday, May 3, 1962

Martha Johnson invites Dr. King to be a member of the John Brown Memorial Association, which is dedicated to the memory of its first freedom rider.

Letter from Mrs. Glenn Durbin to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968

Mrs. Glenn Durbin writes to Dr. King expressing her opposing views on Communism.

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to MLK

Saturday, March 31, 1962

Eleanor Roosevelt invites Dr. King for afternoon tea to discuss ongoing issues in Deerfield, Illinois with Rev. Bletzer and members of the American Freedom of Residence Fund.

Letter from Virginia M. Burke & Phyllis M. Banks to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963

Virginia Burke and Phyllis Banks express their interest in distributing "The Negro Is Your Brother", better known as "Letter from Birmingham Jail", to Wisconsin leaders to inform them of the goals and aspirations of Dr. King and his following. Burke and Banks explain that while the document had appeared in multiple publications, they feel that it has yet to reach the wide audience it deserves. They ask Dr. King's permission to reprint and distribute the document if he holds the copyright.

Letter from Mr. John W. Hall to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966

Mr. Hall of Pomona, California shows his support for Dr. King and the SCLC through an ongoing monetary contribution.

Draft Letter from MLK to Donald DuMont

This draft by Dr. King addresses the goals and similarities of the SCLC with Christian principles. He asserts that the aims of the SCLC "...are [to] work to provide those same basic needs for all men."

Letter from MLK to Rev. Stanley Terry

Wednesday, October 10, 1962

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Reverend Terry of New York for his witness in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Mark Cohen to MLK

Saturday, September 25, 1965

Mark Cohen, of the Political Union of Central High School, requests for Dr. King to speak at the school regarding peace and civil rights on the same day he's addressing the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom in Philadelphia.

Letter from Labor Union President Michael Quill to MLK

Friday, November 30, 1962

Michael Quill, International President of the Transport Workers Union of America, encloses a copy of their 11th Constitutional Convention minutes to Dr. King. He also thanks him for his words at their convention and his contribution to the labor movement in America.