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"Alabama (AL)"

Letter from Attorney General Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Attorney General Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a copy of his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee about civil rights legislation.

Letter from George W. Monroe to President Johnson

Monday, February 26, 1968

A former employee of the US Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida, George Monroe, writes again to President Johnson regarding an injury he received and the discrimination he was met with in trying to receive his sick pay and disability benefits. President Johnson had given Monroe's complaint to the Commanding Officer of the USNA in Jacksonville, however, Monroe was still facing difficulty getting help and wrote again to President Johnson to ask for his help. Dr.

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Statement from the Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Clarence H. Hunter issued this statement to share the news that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights would be holding a public hearing in Montgomery, Alabama to collect information regarding the condition of African Americans in Alabama. Hunter states the purpose of the Commission's investigation and names the notable members of the investigation.

Letter From Heather Burke to the SCLC

Sunday, August 14, 1966

Heather Burke informs the SCLC of her upcoming attendance as a student at Vanderbilt University. She wishes to volunteer with the organization.

SCLC Annual Report by MLK, 1965

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Dr King delivered this report at the SCLC's ninth annual national convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Serving essentially as a State of the Union address for the SCLC, the report touches on the major topics of the Civil Rights Movement and the recent achievements and goals of the SCLC.

Three Year Proposal for the Renewal of the Negro Church in America

In this three-year proposal for the renewal of the Negro Church, there are several line items and subfields describing various ways in which this goal may be accomplished.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Samuel B. McKinney

Dr. and Mrs. King express their condolences for the passing of Reverend Samuel B. McKinney's mother.

Letter from Gordon Bryant to MLK

Tuesday, February 9, 1965

Gordon Bryant, a representative of the Parliament of Australia, extends an invitation to Dr. King to assist the Aboriginal people of Australia in gaining equal rights.

Telegram from Governor Edmund Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Governor Brown writes to Dr. King protesting the brutal treatment of Negro citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Jesse W. Furlow

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Dr. King disagrees with Mr. Furlow's theory that "we are the victims of a Catholic conspiracy."

Letter from Unknown to MLK

This letter from an unknown author advises Dr. King to conduct the largest voter registration drive in an effort to elimate poverty. According to the author, "Politicians understand the ballot."

Capitalism

Dr. King quotes the Honorable John Rankin's remarks regarding capitalism. He discusses two motives that make human beings work: "fear of punishment and the hope of reward."

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

On Being a Good Neighbor

Dr. King tells the Biblical story of the "Good Samaritan on the Road to Jericho," in which a traveler has been robbed, beaten and left for dead. Dr. King connects this story to the Declaration of Independence and offers an analysis of the modern era. Following the example of the "Good Samaritan," he encourages looking beyond "race, religion and nationality" to help those wounded by injustices.

DeWolf, Harold

Dr. King references Harold DeWolf's book, "A Theology of the Living Church."

Letter to Mrs. Levi Hamiliton from Dora McDonald

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Levi Hamilton that Dr. King perceived the mayor's appointment of a bi-racial committee as ""heartwarming." Furthermore, Ms. McDonald notifies Mrs. Hamilton that Dr. King is unable to commit to a date to come and speak in Goldsboro.

Letter from Henrietta Buckmaster to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Henrietta Buckmaster expresses her admiration for Dr. King's stance on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Letter from MLK to Jacquelyn Dowd

Monday, July 15, 1963

Dr. King informs Jacquelyn Dowd that he will not be able to speak as invited in Memphis.

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

Ed Clayton creates a brochure on behalf of SCLC. The brochure contains a message from Dr. King, pictures of SCLC members, a history of the organization and information regarding their initiatives.

Letter from Dr. King to anonymous

In a handwritten draft addressed simply to "gentleman," Dr. King expressed gratitude for having received a copy of a study entitled "Civil Disobedience: Morality and the Coming of the Civil War." So impressed with the contents of the book, Dr. King made it available to staff as reference resource.

National Conference on Christian Education Brochure

Dr. King was a featured guest speaker of the National Conference on Christian Education. This pamphlet lists the events of the program occurring during August 19-22 of 1958.

Letter from Arvid Svard to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963

Arvid Svard asks Dr. King to provide an introduction for an article Svard is writing for the Swedish Baptist Press, which will highlight Dr. King's work. Svard also requests pictures for use in the Swedish edition of "Strength to Love."

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This is the Lincoln Memorial program for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Notable leaders including Dr. King, Walter Reuther, and Whitney M. Young, Jr., will make remarks at the march. Also included is a list of demands, a joint statement from ten organizations and a map.

Letter from George Y. Sodowick to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

George Sodowick expresses to Dr. King disapproval of the planned Poor Peoples Campaign of 1968. Sodowick suggests that, instead of occupying Washington, the demonstrators should settle in and enhance "riot torn cities."

Letter from the N.H.W.P.A to Dr. King

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing his dislike of African Americans.

Letter from William Reynolds to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Mr. Reynolds writes Dr. King requesting to use quotations from his April 5th speech to encourage a higher attendance at future vigils in the Bay Area.

Letter from Jerome S. Ozer to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Mr. Ozer informs Dr. King that his organization will be publishing "Eyewitness: The Negro in American History" by William Loren Katz, which covers the Negro in every aspect of American life. He then requests that Dr. King write an introduction for the book.