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The Student Mobilizer: Build Vietnam Week!

Focusing on the Vietnam War, this issue of The Student Mobilizer covers topics concerning student mobilizations to protest the war, regional meetings, and the organization of a Vietnam Week to help drum up public support and awareness.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Letter from Wilma Hopkins to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mrs. Hopkins sends prayers and Bible scriptures to Dr. King to emotionally support him during his jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama.

NAIRO Supports March for Freedom

The National Association of Intergroup Relations Officials declares their support of the March for Freedom in Washington, D.C. NAIRO urges its members to support the march for the integration of over "20,000,000 Americans of minority identity."

Letter from C. Anderson Davis to MLK

Wednesday, May 13, 1964

C. Anderson Davis, Editor of "The Sphinx" and member of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, requests Dr. King make an appearance and give an address at the traditional Negro Greek Letter fraternity's general convention.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Letter from the United Church of Canada to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

The United Church of Canada expresses appreciation in honor of Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. In addition, the author asks Dr. King to inaugurate a new series of lectureships to students for the Craddock Memorial Lectures.

Order Form: These Are Our Children

This order form depicts a photograph of children of varying races at the 1960 White House Conference on Children and Youth.

Letter from Clayton Yates to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Clayton R. Yates informs Dr. King of the Kappa Boule Meeting held on Morehouse College campus with James P. Brawley and Benjamin E. Mays.

Descartes

Dr. King quotes the French philosopher Rene Descartes on the concept of "doubt."

MLK Flyer: "Integrated Bus Suggestions"

Wednesday, December 19, 1956

In this document, Dr. King and the Reverend W.J. Powell list under "The Montgomery Improvement Association" guidelines to mitigate potential conflicts in the transition to integrated buses. The principle of nonviolence is present throughout the document.

We Have No Government

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

This is a transcription of a press conference held on behalf of the poor people in Mississippi. Leaders and participants discussed alternatives to government aid to help rectify poverty related concerns.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

Letter from Anonymous to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

The author of this letter expresses their concern about poverty across the United States and offers suggestions for Negros to build their own communities.

Invitation From L. Rosenberger to MLK

Thursday, April 2, 1964

The First International Congress of Negro Culture invites Dr. King to their conference in Brazil.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Roy Wilkins, Chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the conference's executive committee.

Letter from Marian R. Johnson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mrs. Johnson expresses her concern regarding the potential threats to undermine Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Telegram from Mrs. J W E Bowen and Mrs. S F Crank to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Mrs. J W E Bowen and Mrs. S F Crank write Dr. King expressing their joy in having a spiritual leader who challenges them to be active in the movement.

The Alberton Family Sends Condolence Offerings

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

The Albertson family sends to Rev. Abernathy and Rev. Young their condolences for Dr. King's death in the form of contribution and encouraging words.

Letter from C. Ray Ballard to MLK Regarding Adam Clayton Powell

Thursday, January 5, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Ballard expresses disappointment to hear a recent radio report of Dr. King's political support for Adam Clayton Powell. Mr. Ballard defines this as a missed opportunity to promote racial justice.

The Bible

Dr. King records notes regarding Protestant Orthodoxy and its great error in dealing with the Bible.

Letter form Dorothy Leeper to Muhammad Ali

Monday, May 1, 1967

Dorothy Leeper thanks Muhammad Ali for his courage in standing by his beliefs. She also commends him and Dr. King for their stance against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Norman Walsh to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Norman Walsh thanks Dr. King for being a spokesperson for Vietnam, poverty, and civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Schiltz

Tuesday, October 12, 1965

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Schiltz for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the significance of their contribution.

Religious Education

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Spencer, Herbert

Dr. King quotes Herbert Spencer's "First Principles" on the subject of evolution.

MLK's Newsweek Statement

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King issues a statement on the defeat of a federal agency that would have allowed an African American to obtain a cabinet position within the national government.

Letter from Burt Nelson and Hilda Nelson to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

Burt and Hilda Nelson write Dr. King requesting five copies of his address of April 5, 1967.

Letter from a School Teacher to MLK

A Negro special education teacher of a white class asks Dr. King to send her students a letter. She is teaching them about race relations and believes that a letter from Dr. King would be very encouraging.