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"Alabama (AL)"

Letter from MLK to Johnnie McKinney

Thursday, May 13, 1965
Wyoming (WY)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Cheyenne, Wyoming "under the auspices of the NAACP."

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Thursday, February 8, 1968
Iowa (IA)

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.

Letter from student Sue Moranian to MLK

Wednesday, February 22, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

Sue Moranian, a fourteen year old white girl, writes Dr. King and encloses a $2.00 contribution to assist in endeavors to help blacks reach racial equality.

Letter from Ann & John Flynn

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
San Francisco, CA, New York, NY

In this letter, Ann Flynn requests a copy of the text of Dr. King's speech made at Riverside Church.

Statement by MLK on the U.S. Stand in Vietnam

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM

Dr. King discusses how to involve the public in discussions regarding the Vietnam War. He states that the public should be educated about the history and issues of the war.

Letter from Everett C. McKeage to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, FRANCE, VIETNAM, INDONESIA

Mr. McKeage writes to Dr. King expressing his satisfaction and appreciation for his position on Vietnam relations. He encloses a monetary donation to assist Dr. King's work.

Telegram from Al Duckett to MLK

Saturday, July 9, 1966
New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this telegram to Dr. King, Mr. Al Duckett professes his willingness to protest in Chicago.

Chicago Freedom Movement Tent-In

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Illinois (IL)

This flyer outlines the platform for the Chicago Freedom Movement's Tent-In. This organization, based out of Warrenville, Illinois, sought for equality in housing and was an initiative of the SCLC and Al Raby's Council of Federated Organizations.

Remarks by the Right Rev. Richard S. Emrich

Friday, June 28, 1957
Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL

This address accompanies the awarding of the Springarn Medal to Dr. King. The Medal is presented annually by the NAACP for Outstanding Achievement by a Negro Citizen.

SCLC Duties

Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Louisiana (LA), Tennessee (TN)

This document outlines general responsibilities and specific duties of SCLC officers. Top level members listed include Dr. King, President, Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to President, Andrew Young, Program Director, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, Office Manager and Educational Consultant, and Ralph Abernathy, Financial Secretary-Treasurer. The document states that Dr. King's general responsibility as President is to "coordinate and interpret the total program of SCLC."

Letter from S.W. McAllister to MLK

New York (NY), Norfolk, VA, Georgia (GA)

Mr. McAllister, a father of three, requests Dr. King's assistance in obtaining a divorce from his wife who is living with another man. Dr. King was an image of hope for many people and often received requests for help in areas unrelated to civil rights.

Letter from Erik Ruden to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1968
Stockholm, Sweden, Atlanta, GA

Upon learning of Dr. King's speaking engagement at the upcoming World Council meeting in Uppsala, Sweden, Ruden invites him to an additional meeting at luncheon or area Baptist Church.

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Louisville, KY

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Wednesday, March 27, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

Letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to MLK

Friday, March 10, 1967
Georgia (GA), Wisconsin (WI), Milwaukee, WI

This is a letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to Dr. King inviting him to be the keynote speaker at a Jewish Seminar on Negro-Jewish relationships.

Letter from Sylvia Walters to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York (NY)

Sylvia Walter writes Dr. King commending him on his strong statements and expresses that he has given many the strength to continue in fight for civil rights and peace.

Letter from Edwina C. Johnson to MLK

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Arizona (AZ)

Edwina C. Johnson claims that the racial problems in the United States are the result of "what is recorded as 'The American Heritage'" and its debasement of African Americans in media, particularly textbooks. Johnson suggests emphasizing the role that African Americans have played in American history. Johnson also provides a list of freedoms that should not be denied to African Americans.

Letter from Charles H. Walter to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 29, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI

Charles Walters notifies Dora McDonald that he is sending a copy of the current edition of Labor Today. Walters requests an 1100 word article and photo from Dr. King for the forthcoming issue.

Homeric Problem

Dr. King briefly outlines the problem surrounding the work of the Greek poet Homer. The note card references the view of German scholar and critic Friedrich August Wolf and documents two primary theories regarding Homeric literature.

Letter from MLK to Esther Thompson

Monday, November 29, 1965
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King informs Mrs. Thompson that the SCLC does not have the resources to help aid her husband's sight. Dr. King recommends that she contact churches in her area for help.

Letter from E. F. S. Davies to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965
Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), New York (NY)

E. F. S. Davies, Head of the Department of Philosophy at Virginia State College, writes Dr. King regarding A. J. Muste's civil rights efforts in the 1930's and 1940's.

Housing for Negroes in Atlanta, Georgia

Wednesday, June 24, 1959
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA

This document discusses the critical need of housing for Negroes in Atlanta, Georgia. The role of Atlanta Urban League and the federal Housing Administration in seeking housing for Negroes are discussed and unpublished Commission on Race and Housing reports are exposed that illustrate housing discrimination in Atlanta between 1945 and 1958.

Letter from Edwin Allaire to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Michigan (MI), VIETNAM

The writer, who identifies himself as a professor at the University of Michigan, encourages Dr. King to announce his candidacy for the Presidency.

Chapter 1 - Introduction

Vermont (VT)

In this dissertation, Dr. King discusses several investigations and problems. He centers the paper around a comparison of "the conceptions of God in the thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Ralph David Abernathy: A Man of the People

Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Memphis, TN, Albany, GA, Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH, St. Augustine, FL

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference published this booklet profiling Ralph David Abernathy. The articles describe his background, how he got involved in the Civil Rights Movement and the future of the SCLC under his leadership.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this 1967 speech to the Hungry Club, Dr. King addresses America’s chief moral dilemma by focusing on three major evils: racism, poverty, and war.

A Minority of One

Thursday, June 1, 1967

In an attempt to enhance positive intergroup relations, Mrs. Porter was interviewed during "inservice education sessions" at a school of nursing. Because Mrs. Porter was "the first and only Negro who had been graduated from" the school, the faculty wanted insight into her experience of integration. Gloria M. Francis wrote this article covering the interview.

Letter from L. Serron to MLK

Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

L. Serron writes to Dr. King requesting materials on the Selma Demonstration and the March on Montgomery for class usage.

The Mainichi Newspaper to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Washington, D.C., JAPAN

Aoki Shigeru, General Manager of The Mainichi Newspaper's Washington Bureau, requests an interview with Dr. King regarding the ending of the Vietnam War.

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Memphis, TN, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.