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This note card discusses cognition in relation to the context of events.

Letter from John G. Kirk to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY

John G. Kirk of Metromedia asks Dr. King to write an editorial for a future publication called "America Now." Dr. King's article is to be based on the assumption that it is the responsibility of the government to enhance the dignity of individual citizens.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK about a Contribution

Thursday, March 9, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King for contributions needed to carry out the work of the National Advisory Committee On Farm Labor (NACFL). Randolph states, "NACFL stretches its limited funds far, but now at this critical point we must ask for your support".

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Premier Kosygin and President Johnson

Sunday, June 18, 1967

Civil rights activist Harry Wachtel tells Soviet Premier Kosygin and President Lyndon Johnson that the world community depends on their solutions to crucial problems. He charges President Johnson with ending bombing in Vietnam and he charges Premier Kosygin with influencing Vietnam towards peaceful negotiations. Lastly, he asks both leaders to help eliminate war and poverty in the Middle East.

Invitation from Manitoba New Democratic Party

Thursday, August 19, 1965

B. Swailes, Provincial Secretary of the Manitoba New Democratic Party, extends a speaking invitation to Dr. King to discuss human rights.

Card from Dr. and Mrs. H. R. Holman


Dr. & Mrs. H. R. Holman send a holiday card with wishes for a prosperous New Year.

Letter from Norma Perez to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Norma Perez sends her condolences to Mrs. King after Dr. King's assassination.

Appeal from Wyatt Tee Walker for Albany Support

Wednesday, July 25, 1962
Albany, GA

Following the arrests of Dr. King and three others who held a prayer vigil at the Albany, Georgia City Hall, Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker issues this appeal for support from those active in the civil rights movement. He calls for telegrams to be sent to federal, state, and local officials, prayer vigils, and the wearing of black armbands.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to President Johnson

Wednesday, December 22, 1965
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York (NY)

Rev. Abernathy urges President Johnson to meet with a group of poverty-stricken people from Syracuse, New York at Johnson's Texas White House.

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

Tuesday, December 1, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

Letter Draft from MLK to Mrs. Lewiston

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Lewiston to inform her that he will not be able to assist her with her financial problems because of the financial burdens that have already been placed on SCLC.

Anonymous Card and Article to MLK


An anonymous sender encloses an article written about Dr. King and his anti-Vietnam War sentiments.

Letter from Judith Brockhart to MLK Regarding a Fine Relief

Monday, October 2, 1967
Kentucky (KY)

In this letter Judith Brookhart appeals to Dr. King and the SCLC for aid in paying fines accrued from being arrested during civil rights marches.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

New York (NY), Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Statement on the Indictment of MLK

Thursday, March 3, 1960
Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Orangeburg, SC, Birmingham, AL, Nashville, TN, Tallahassee, FL, Little Rock, AR

The "Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr." issued this statement, accusing the state of Alabama of falsely distorting Dr. King's 1958 income tax return in an attempt to indict him.

Letter from Mrs. Berdeax to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Mrs. Berdeax of Ohio informs Dr. King that she supports his position on the war in Vietnam and is ashamed of her country.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Regarding "Strength To Love"

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New York, NY

This letter dated October 15, 1964, was sent to Dora McDonald from Joan Daves. Dora McDonald is the secretary to Dr.King. Joan Daves is writing to Ms. McDonald asking that Dr. King sign the French contracts for his book," Strength To Love" as soon as possible.

Whitehead's Doctrine of Freedom

Dr. King examines Alfred North Whitehead’s doctrine of freedom as described in “Science and the Modern World.”

Rabbi Heschel on the War on Vietnam


Rabbi Abraham Heschel, civil rights advocate and associate of Dr. King, writes on the ethical corruption created by the Vietnam War. Calling the war an example of "extreme absurdity" that has been "nurtured on stereotypes," Rabbi Heschel encourages American citizens to recognize the demoralization of the war and take action against it.

Letter from Gitta Gossman to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
New York (NY)

The document references earnings from Dr. King's books "Strength to Love" and "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from James H. Meredith to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

James Meredith writes from Nigeria to congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Noble Peace Prize and emphasizes that the struggle for human rights is a world-wide struggle. Meredith, the first African-American student to attend the University of Mississippi, was at that time a post-graduate researcher in Nigeria.

Letter from Mrs. Ross D. Davis to MLK

Monday, February 14, 1966
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Davis invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker for the Women's National Democratic Club.

Letter from Bob Edmiston to MLK

Sunday, March 31, 1968
Oklahoma (OK)

Bob Edmiston of Northeastern State College writes Dr. King requesting campaign material for "Choice 68," the national collegiate primary sponsored by Time magazine.

Letter from Floyd Mulkey to MLK

Saturday, December 16, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Floyd Mulkey writes Dr. King a letter, commending him on his plans for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter to MLK Regarding Swedish Record Sales

Monday, April 25, 1966

Chris Folcker follows up with Dr. King regarding sales figures and payments related to the sale of a recording in Sweden.

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962
New York, NY

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

Letter from Lee Wood to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
Texas (TX)

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King concerning civil and human rights. Mr. Wood seeks to create a third political party and asks Dr. King for any information that will help him meet his goal.

Telegram from MLK to the Pennsylvania State Welfare Rights Organization

Monday, March 25, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King states his support for demonstrations by the Pennsylvania State Welfare Rights Organization.


Dr. King discusses the relationship between God and humanist thinking.

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.