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Letter from S. W. Molodtsov to MLK

Thursday, January 19, 1967

The International Institute for Peace sends this letter to Dr. King on behalf of the World Council of Peace. A recent meeting undertook "a major step towards the international coordination of activities to end the war in Vietnam," and the meeting resulted the decision to host an international peace conference. Dr. King is invited to participate in the conference. The Council expresses that his presence and contribution would greatly enhance the conference's impact on anti-Vietnam efforts.

Ritschl

Dr. King records a quote of Albrecht Ritschl regarding Christology.

Dr. King Sermon Notes

Under the subject, "The Vision of a World Made New," Dr. King drafted these sermon notes. The essential message of the sermon referred to a need for a "new world order". Plato and Karl Marx are two of the great philosophers referenced in this document. Dr. King delivered this sermon at the annual meeting of the Woman's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convetion in St. Louis, Missouri on September 9, 1954.

Telegram from MLK to Clarence T. Lundquist

Thursday, March 15, 1962

Dr. King writes Clarence Lundquist of the Wage, Hour and Public Contracts Division of the Department of Labor to request an investigation into complaints of wage discrimination at the Sea Pak Shrimp factories in Elonia and St. Simon's Island, Georgia.

In A Land Where Murder is Respectable

This pamphlet, issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, features a map of Alabama highlighting 18 murders of African Americans and white civil rights workers.

The Atlanta Board of Education

Friday, September 15, 1967

The Atlanta Board of Education neglects to solve educational issues in the Negro community. There are protests and demonstrations from those who object to the disdain of action. Julian Bond purposes a course of action designed to educate, convince, and force action from the board.

Letter from MLK to Don Blaine

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King shows delight in Mr. Don Blaine's idea of promoting a "peace caravan" to travel around the United States. He requests that Blaine further develop the idea and contact heads of various peace organizations to assist in the endeavor. Dr. King also displays his willingness to participate in the caravan.

The National Council of Negro Women

This brochure gives a brief overview of the NCNW and the positive results its had on the Negro community.

Letter from Archbishop Hallinan to MLK

In this letter, Archbishop Hallinan offers his words of gratitude to Dr. King, for his work, and requests a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here."

Jeremiah

In this series of ten notecards, Dr. King breaks down the Book of Jeremiah into mutiple sections, including chapters and versus regarding Good, knowledge, sin, and forgiveness.

Letter from Adlai E. Stevenson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

US Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai Stevenson, informs Dr. King that they will have to postpone their meeting due to a U.N. Security Council meeting that Mr. Stevenson has to preside over.

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

Monday, April 1, 1968

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Letter Victoria Gist to MLK about a Speaking Engagement

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

Mrs. Victoria Gist, State President of the Hospitality Group, requests that Dr. King speak at a banquet for the State Youth Congress. She provides transportation instructions and contact information.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Frazer Earle, a member of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews Inc., extends Dr. King a second invitation to their Annual Banquet. Mr. Earle informs Dr. King that his acceptance to this invitation will allow him to meet with the students, the press, the religious community, and businessmen.

Letter from Rev. Canon John S. Yaryan to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 13, 1964

Rev. Yaryan writes to confirm Dr. King's appearance at the Grace Cathedral in San Francisco. He asks that Dr. King preach not only for their morning service, but also the evening worhsip service as well.

Note from Will Dale to MLK

Will Dale writes Dr. King commending him for encouraging Black athletes to boycott the Olympic games.

A Note with no Addressee from the Desk of Joan Daves

A note on Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, letterhead to an unaddressed recipient about Japanese annotations of "Strength to Love."

L. A. Dotson Attempts to Speak with MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

L. A. Dotson has made several attempts to speak with Dr. King on a personal matter. Unfortunately, Dr. King has not responded. L. A. Dotson forwards contact information to Dr. King and has taken residence at the Regency Hyatt room 226.

Biography of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr

This document presents a biographical sketch of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Letter from Mrs. Julia D. Fields to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Julia Fields is the only Negro stockbroker in Florida and discusses the adversities she has experienced with Dr. King. Mrs. Fields describes this time period as the "worst year of her life" because the whites resent any Negro attempting to move in their neighborhood. Dr. King is addressed to possibly give advice to better her situation and uplift her "let down" spirit.

Book Outline: Education and the Urban Poor

This book outline lists the chapters and contributing authors of the publication "Education and the Urban Poor." The authors represented include educational professionals from all over the country including Robert L. Green, Associate Professor at Michigan State University and Education Director for the SCLC. Dr. King is listed as the author of Chapter Two entitled "Education and the Negro Revolution."

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

William Rutherford recounts his difficulties trying to contact Dr. King while he was in the United States. He goes on to express interest in doing fundraising programs for SCLC in Europe, as well as, mobilizing public opinion in support of the cause.

People In Action: Nothing Changing Unless

Sunday, January 28, 1962

In his regular column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes in support of a 435 million dollar job training bill that would "salvage a segment of the unemployed and potentially employable."

Letter from Robert L. Tucker Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Robert Tucker inquires about Dr. King's views on Adam Clayton Powell and his position in Washington. Tucker states that he has great respect for Dr. King, which is why he wants clarity on his sentiments regarding the Powell controversy.

Letter from Ethel Love to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, May 9, 1961

Ms. Love, program chairman of Warren Business and Professional Women's Club, responds to Ms. McDonald's previous letter regarding Dr. King's availability to speak in Warren, Ohio. Ms. Love ask Ms. McDonald to respond with "an approximate estimate of the likely fee."

Debit Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Friday, April 7, 1967

This debit memo from Joan Daves informs Dr. King of the expenses for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Telegram from MLK to Reverend F. D. Reece

Saturday, January 11, 1964

Dr. King congratulates Selma, Alabama Reverend F. D. Reese for demonstrating on behalf of teachers fighting injustice.

Letter from Miss Shirley Wright to Mrs. King

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Mrs. King writes Shirley Wright of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, thanking her for the copy of the "We Shall Overcome" record.

SCLC Constituent to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, May 2, 1968

This letter, originating from New York City in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination, is from a supporter who is inquiring about the purchase of items relating to Dr. King's correspondence.