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Race

Dr. King references quotations from George-Louis Leclerc (Comte de Buffon) and Jean-Baptiste Lamarck concerning the creation of racial identification.

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

Telegram from Robert L. Green, Floyd McKissack and Roy Wilkins to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

Mr. Wilkins, Mr. Kissack and Mr. Green express their viewpoint regarding restrictive racial policies towards the Negro, more specifically towards Negro women by members of the Women's City Club of Detroit. The author encourages a dismembership from the club based on their findings.

Letter from William A. Lawson to MLK

Friday, May 1, 1964
Texas (TX), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, LEBANON

William A. Lawson extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to an assembly at Texas Southern University.

The Martin Luther King Column: Life's Three Dimensions

INDIA

In this self titled column, Dr. King writes about his theory of the three dimensions of the life: length, breadth and height. He refers to the "length of life" as an individual's desire to achieve personal goals. Next, he speaks of the "breadth of life," which is characterized by reaching out and helping others. Last but not least, Dr. King describes the "height of life" or a person's spiritual pursuit and connection with God. Dr. King asserts that in order to live a complete life, all three dimensions must be cultivated.

Resolution of the SCLC Board of Directors

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS)

The SCLC Board of Directors issues a resolution at its Tenth Annual Convention that lists what it considers "flagrant injustices" which violate the rights of American workers. As part of the resolution, the SCLC requests that Congress make corrections to the National Labor Relations Act.

Letter from Loretta Abbott to MLK

Wednesday, October 1, 1958
New York (NY), MEXICO

The American Dream Outline

Philadelphia, PA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King outlines his "American Dream" speech on the back of letterhead from the Bellevue Stafford hotel. Dr. King writes about a "massive action program" to address injustice in America.

Letter from Ms. Dora Byron of Emory University to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Ms. Byron of Emory University's Community Educational Service requests for Dr. King to appear on a new campus public service television program entitled "Profile."

Letter from Beryl Arensberg to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
New York, NY

Beryl Arensberg writes Dr. King asking him to consider a strategy that emphasizes a collective mourning for all those impacted by the Vietnam War. He believes such a course of action will inspire direct impact in several admirable ways.

Rauschenbusch on Sin

Dr. King references and outlines Rauschenbusch's view on sin. Rauschenbusch was a Baptist minister and a key figure in the Social Gospel movement.

God

Dr. King expresses the power of God as being infinite beyond comprehension of man.

Science (Definition)

Dr. King records a definition of science.

Love

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, June 20, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Secretary of the Hadley Executive Committee corresponds with Dora McDonald to arrange a date for Dr. King to address the committee. Shaefer provides a list of available dates from which Dr. King can select.

Letter from John Mack to MLK Requesting Advice

Tuesday, August 22, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Pittsburgh, PA

In this letter, John Mack asks Dr. King for advice on selecting the proper employment position that would satisfy his desire to contribute to "the perpetuation of social change and Negro progress," while still providing economic security for him and his family.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ruby Hurley

Thursday, January 3, 1963
Georgia (GA)

At Dr. King's request, Ms. McDonald sends Ruby Hurley a check from Delores Robinson for a lifetime membership in the NAACP.

Letter from Emmitt LaMarr to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967
New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Kentucky (KY)

Emmitt LaMarr writes Dr. King about the status of his proposal to the National Dairy Products Corporation regarding Operation Breadbasket. Although LaMarr does not hold an executive position with the corporation, he assures Dr. King his efforts are not in vain.

Letter from Karen Goldberg to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963
Massachusetts (MA)

Karen Goldberg, a twelve-year-old in a religious school, requests some biographical information about Dr. King for a group project.

Letter to Dora MacDonald from Joan Daves

Monday, December 12, 1966
New York, NY

Joan Daves writes to Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's availability, while he's away in New York. She also requests that a copy of the transcript, from a conference, be given to Dr. King as well as herself.

Telegram from Rev. Loe Champion to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968
Milwaukee, WI, Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King was the recipient of this Western Union telegram from Rev. Loe Champion of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket, an economic project of the SCLC. Rev. Champion sent this telegram to show support for Dr. King's struggles in the South. The correspondence was sent two days after a march Dr. King led in Memphis, Tennessee in support of striking sanitation workers.

Letter from Lyman Cady to MLK

Wednesday, July 5, 1967
Ohio (OH), Birmingham, AL

Lyman Cady, of Westminister Presbyterian Church, expresses his support for Dr. King's recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" He also commends Dr. King's overall leadership throughout the Civil Rights Movement.

People in Action: Segregation And The Church

Saturday, February 2, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this New York Amsterdam News article of February 2, 1963, Dr. King mentions writer James Baldwin’s scathing indictment of the Christian Church and states that the Church has been complicit in the system of racial segregation or remained silent on racial injustice, the nation’s most urgent social ill. The church should be the headlight, he states, not the taillight and be true to the prophetic call for justice. King takes hope, however, having just attended the National Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, which brought together Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish leaders.

Letter to Ralph Abernathy Offering Suggestions

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

A supporter of the civil rights movement writes this letter to Reverend Abernathy. It is suggested that the Negro leaders of the civil rights movement consider the voting power of senior citizens. In order to get "a massive single solid vote bloc" it would be advantageous to also include the poor population. With this amount of supporters, the writer believes it would be possible to sustain a presidential candidacy. The author continues by telling Abernathy of Russia's economic goal.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Grand Hotel

Oslo, Norway

Dora McDonald sends an additional Grand Hotel reservation request for the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies of December 1964.

Permission Form from Friendship House to MLK for Signature

Sunday, December 11, 1966

This document, from James G. Duignan of Friendship House, is sent to Dr. King for his signature, granting permission to reproduce, distribute and or sell recorded copies of two speeches.

John Locke

Dr. King records a quote from English political theorist John Locke on the development of the human mind.

A Born Again Christian writes MLK

The author of this letter, signed "Born Again Christian," urges Dr. King to set his ministry more on God rather than participating in civil rights demonstrations.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 29, 1965
New York, NY

In this letter Ms. Daves covers several topics relating to dealings with publishers and the protocol in the future. She makes a number of recommendations on the allocation of Dr. King's time and resources and stresses the priority of "a constructive and continuing publishing program related to your work and ideas."

Letter from Herbert Jones to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS, Boston, MA

Mr. Jones informs Dr. King of a grassroots civil rights organization (STOP) that seeks to implement a "stay at home" protest nationwide. Mr. Jones seeks Dr. King's assistance to make that happen.