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Brotherhood Cannot Be a Theory

Friday, February 19, 1965

This newspaper clipping of The Southern Israelite features segments on the Atlanta banquet honoring Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Given on his return to the States, there were twelve hundred and fifty Atlanta citizens in attendance. Included articles are: welcoming comments by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, a tribute by Archbishop Paul Hallinan, and a transcription of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Norman Taylor to MLK

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

Norman Taylor, an agent at Investment Bonds, Inc., commends Dr. King on his work and for being a man of integrity. He offers assistance to help improve the living conditions of the poor in the slums of Chicago.

Calvin Kytle to Head Information Center for Urban America

This press release revelas that Calvin Kytle will head a new national information center for Urban American, Inc.

Evil

Dr. King references the concept of evil.

Letter from the Unitarian Church of Germantown to MLK

Friday, February 23, 1962

The Unitarian Church of Germantown requests Dr. King's presence during the Pulpit Schedule for 1962-1963. The organization is aware of Dr. King's endless schedule and provides him with a honorarium if he were to accept this invitation.

Let My People Vote

Dr. King addresses the problem of voting that Negroes in America are encountering and also talks about SCOPE's upcoming initiatives.

Nationalism

Dr. King quotes Charles Summer, stating that being "children of a common Father" is a "more sacred bond" than being a citizen.

The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King quotes "The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy."

Letter from Nina Brown to MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965

Nina C. Brown writes Dr. King expressing appreciation on behalf of Pennsylvania State University for his visit to the institution. Additionally, she wishes Dr. King much success in his continued efforts to achieve civil rights.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Monday, April 26, 1965

Sister Mary Leoline reflects upon her participation in the Selma-Montgomery March as a positive experience.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Theodore Smith

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Mr. Wachtel informs Theodore Smith and Hosea Williams that they are in danger of breaking the terms of a loan agreement from The American Foundation on Nonviolence.

An Open Letter to Free Americans

In response to Dr. King's assassination, the author urges "Free Americans" to join the fight against racism.

Letter from Mr. Harry W. Allison, Ph.D. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Mr. Allison, a white clinical psychologist, expresses his support of Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Arthur W. Jordan

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Arthur Jordan for a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Social Ethics in Psalms

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in Psalms 72.

Letter from Robert A. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, November 17, 1964

Robert A. Jackson, Minister for Knox's Church, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the many honors bestowed upon him. Minister Jackson invites Dr. King to come speak at either the Polio Dinner or the 100th Anniversary of the Church Home.

Numbers

Dr. King cites several verses from the Book of Numbers.

Letter from MLK to AJ Muste

After considerable thought and prayer, Dr. King informs the recipients of this letter of his decision to travel to the Soviet Union under the sponsorship of the American Baptist Convention. He conveys his sense of duty as a Negro leader to speak to Baptists in Russia.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to President Johnson

Wednesday, December 22, 1965

Rev. Abernathy urges President Johnson to meet with a group of poverty-stricken people from Syracuse, New York at Johnson's Texas White House.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1962

In this letter to Dr. King, Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College informs Dr. King about the meeting with Robert Troutman on matters that involve input from President Kennedy.

Letter from James T. Hale to MLK

Tuesday, September 22, 1964

Morehouse alumnus James T. Hale invites Dr. King to speak to the community in Clarksville, Tennessee. He expresses how the majority of the community has not had the opportunity to hear Dr. King speak and asks that Dr. King provide a possible date.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 9, 1967

In this letter, Robert L. Green, Professor at Michigan State University, requests a signature of approval from Dr. King. This signature would grant permission for Social Scientists to have involvement with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Rodney Armanie to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Rodney Armanie writes to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Invitation Letter from Mrs. Frank K. Simms to MLK and CSK to Attend the 28th Annual Coference of the National Association of Ministers' Wives

Sunday, November 19, 1967

Mrs. Sims invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 28th Annual Converence of the National Association of Ministers' Wives in Chicago IL.

Telegram from MLK to Hugh Shearer

Dr. King sends a congratulatory telegram to Mr. Shearer for his elevation to Prime Minister of Jamaica.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

The Bible

Dr. King records his views of Scott regarding "The Bible." Scott believes that beyond being an "anthology of the noblest religions," the Bible is also an account of history. Even though there is the ambiguity that comes with history, there is also an unambiguous message of the purpose of God and the destiny of man.

Registration Form for WCLC Assembly Session

Thursday, June 24, 1965

The Western Christian Leadership Conference sends this pamphlet to potential participants and encourages registration for the Assembly Session in July, 1965. Dr. King is featured as the Mass Meeting Speaker.

Letter from Patricia M. Shillingburg to Walter Fauntroy

Tuesday, January 16, 1968

Patricia M. Shillingburg requests payments that she has yet to recieve upon her release from the SCLC during her assistance with the Harry Belafonte Concert. After making numerous attempts to discover the reason of her release and location of her funds, Ms. Shillingburg informs Rev. Walter Fauntroy that she will take alternative appropriate steps to secure the payment of her services.