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Lawyer Ejected By House Inquiry; Seven Walk Out

Thursday, August 18, 1966

New York lawyer Arthur Kinoy was ejected from the hearing room of the House Committee on Un-American Activities in Washington following a heated legal argument. Seven other lawyers withdrew from the proceedings following Mr. Kinoy's ejection.

Nonviolence

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Invitation from Israeli Ambassador to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965

In this letter, Avraham Harman invites Dr. King to Israel on behalf of the Embassy of Israel.

Telegram from Newcastle University to MLK

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

The registrar of Newcastle University inquires if Dr. King would be able to accept an honorary degree from the institute.

Letter from A. William Loos to James Farmer

Monday, July 19, 1965

A. William Loos expresses his agreement with the actions of the recipient, James Farmer, which lead to the reconsideration of a vote to remove United States troops from Vietnam.

Letter from Nancy Parr to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1968

In this letter, Nancy Parr offers help to Dr. King in trying to "avert riots in 1968" to prevent the "right-wing" from taking over the nation.

Cardinal Virtues

Dr. King defines "cardinal virtues" and then lists those held by the Greeks and Christians.

Resurrection of Jesus

Dr. King quotes George Hedley’s “The Symbol of the Faith.”

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

A supporter of the Vietnam War expresses his conflicting views regarding the struggle for democracy in Southeast Asia. In order to combat the brutality of North Vietnamese forces, he insists that American military presence will ultimately prove that "terror cannot succeed as a weapon in Vietnam, we shall discourage it's use anywhere."

Letter from Client's Law Firm to MLK

Tuesday, September 20, 1966

Green, Ayers, Swigert, and Cluster write a letter to Dr. King requesting that he speak to Randolph T. Blackwell and encourage him to acknowledge receipt of a poem.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

The document, shown here, contains an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "The Fellow Who Stayed at Home." According, to the outline, Dr. King breaks down two types of sin: Sins of Passion and Sins of Disposition.

Letter from Joe Martine to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Martine shares with Dr. King strong feelings of opposition to the government drafting men for the war in Vietnam. He also comments on statements made by Eartha Kitt at a White House dinner hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, addressing the correlation between juvenile delinquency, crime, and war.

Letter from MLK to Mr. W David Angus

Wednesday, February 12, 1964

Dr. King is responding to the invitation given by W. David Angus. He regrettably informs Angus that due to his overcrowded schedule, he is unable to speak in Montreal. He suggests Reverend Ralph Abernathy as a more than adequate alternative to speak.

Letter from Joseph L. Kapica to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Joseph Kapica, a freelance writer from Connecticut, requests special commentary from Dr. King regarding the issue of interracial adoption. Kapica writes about interracial adoption based on findings from the Child Welfare League of America.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson on Greenville Air Base

Wednesday, August 10, 1966

Dr. King writes to President Johnson proposing the conversion of the Greenville Air Base to a center for training and housing for poverty-stricken Negro citizens of the Mississippi Delta. He urges that the program be coordinated by federal officials and representatives, that action be taken to provide decent housing and nondiscriminatory training programs, and that clear-cut procedures for evaluation be established.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK 7/25/1967

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row Publishers, drafted this correspondence to Dr. King. Mr. Canfield was delighted to inform Dr. King of the impressive sales of his last book. He acknowledged that reorders for Dr. King's book came to an amazing $1,020, the best in comparison to bestsellers and wholesale stores. The book being referred to, in this document, would be Dr. King's most prophetic, entitled, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

A Promising Day for the City of Selma

In this handwritten public statement, the author addresses the Negro citizens of Selma, Alabama by commending their efforts of non-violence during a one-thousand person demonstration for equal voting rights.

Letter from Matthew T. Doherty to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Matthew Doherty responds to an "eloquent and moving" appeal from Dr. King in the July 26th issue of The New York Times. Doherty discusses the recent surge in "black power" and its role in the ongoing struggle for equal rights. The writer also mentions his "small" contribution to aid Dr. King's efforts to "make this a better world for all of us."

Letter from MLK to Rev. John Porter

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to John T. Porter for his participation in and support of the movement in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from the Prime Minister of Jordan to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967

The Prime Minister of Jordan, Wasfi Tell, invites Dr. King to visit Jordan during his upcoming pilgrimage to the Middle East. Minister Tell assures Dr. King that his pilgrimage will be regarded spiritually, and not politically.

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

Friday, February 9, 1968

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

Letter from Deacon Willie McClinek to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Deacon Willie McClinek invites Dr. King, on behalf of the Sensational Heavenly Dew Drops and The Stars of Faith gospel singers, to make an appearance at their play entitled "Master, I Want To Live" in Philadelphia.

The Southern Struggle - What Can You Do?

Corretta Scott King discusses the privilege of being able to experience a great social revolution based on love and nonviolence, as inspired by the teachings of Jesus and Gandhi. She identifies Rosa Park's personal protest on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama as the beginning of the southern struggle and consequent revolution. She goes on to describe how this simple act aroused a great movement across the south, ultimately leading to the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in January of 1957.

The Uniqueness of Jesus

Dr. King reflects on the virgin birth of Jesus and how this attribute was used to contextualize his "uniqueness." This reflection later appeared in his essay entitled "What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection" that he completed during his time at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Dr. MLK to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church about a Contribution

Friday, February 9, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church in Stuanton, Virginia while explaining how such contributions help the SCLC and civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Evans

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Evans for their monetary contribution of $200. Dr. King references the work of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and explains how the Evans' contribution supports the efforts of the organization.

Knox, John

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on John Knox.