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Greeks

GREECE

Dr. King shares his personal insight on Greek and African "ability," relative to African-Americans.

Letter from Fannie Lou Hamer to Friends

Monday, October 23, 1967
Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer requests the help of 'Friends', pertaining to voting rights in Mississippi. Mrs. Hamer also details some of the sufferings of black folks in Mississippi, especially, as it pertains to potential repercussions for them registering to vote.

Proposal for Black Independence

Al Shabazz writes up a program for Black independence. The proposal suggests two program options for leaders to choose from. Once the program has been decided the leader would go out and gather the opinion of the masses. Next, the program would implement unconventional education along with employment and survival skills. The program also promotes an independent nation with alliances from those of all races. The program promotes black revolution and the demise of the elite White Supremacist.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King quotes Bernard of Clairvaux on the character of the ideal Christian.

Letter from Donald Godbey to MLK Regarding Cooperation

Thursday, June 15, 1967
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

In this letter, Donald Godbey offers Dr. King various suggestions on how men and women of all backgrounds can join together in unity.

And There Was Love

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, California (CA), Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), VIETNAM, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Connecticut (CT), CANADA

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Telegram from Elmer J. Holland to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Congressman Holland assures Dr. King that he will "oppose all crippling amendments" to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965.

Telegram from Malcolm X to MLK

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
St. Augustine, FL, New York (NY)

Malcolm X offers Dr. King assistance with the situation in St. Augustine, including the organization of self-defense units.

War

Dr. King records a quote regarding war from General Omar Bradley in 1950.

Suggested Approach and Chronology for St. Augustine

St. Augustine, FL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Wyatt Tee Walker writes Dr. King about the purpose, need and strategy for the St. Augustine demonstrations. In this letter there are details for proper attire and a schedule of demonstrations.

Ebenezer Baptist Church Apartment Complex

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
North Carolina (NC)

Ralph D. Abernathy informs Mr. J. Lafayette Morgan that he is unable to supply the information Mr. Morgan requested.

Letter from Kenneth Lee to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 17, 1967
UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Kenneth Lee extends his gratitude for Dr. King's sponsorship status for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. Mr. Lee asks Dora McDonald if a meeting can be arranged between himself and Dr. King during his visit to Atlanta, Georgia in August 1967.

Letter from the N.H.W.P.A to Dr. King

Chicago, IL

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing his dislike of African Americans.

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Virginia (VA), Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C., McComb, MS, Greenwood, MS

This pamphlet details the history, programs and purpose of The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Request For Meeting Telegram From Dr. King To Mayor Daley of Chicago

Sunday, March 13, 1966
Chicago, IL

This telegram dated March 14, 1966, was sent to Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley of Chicago from Dr. King. Dr. King asks the Mayor if he can meet with him in city hall, along with other religious leaders. He wants to discuss with the Mayor about considering programs to eliminate slums,expand health services, and to improve employment and job training opportunities for the people of Chicago.

Letter from MLK To W. H. Jackson

Tuesday, April 24, 1962
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King responds to a letter from W. H. Jackson, regarding the Chicago Sunday Evening club. Mr. Jackson receives information on the possible effects his previous letter may have on Dr. King's white friends.

Letter from Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966
Oslo, Norway, SWEDEN

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway invites Dr. King to speak in Oslo, with proceeds from the broadcast of his speech going towards the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Student Jacquelyn Gravely

Wednesday, March 18, 1964
North Carolina (NC)

Dora McDonald refers Allen High School student Jacquelyn Gravely to read "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Crusader Without Violence" for her school assignment. She conveys Dr. King's good wishes towards Gravely's academic career.

Letter from Robert Hatch to Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 25, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Robert Hatch, a staff associate with the National Education Association, asks Miss McDonald to inform Dr. King of an invitation to speak at the organization's banquet in New York City. Hatch mentions that he is not only a former Morehouse classmate of Dr. King's, but also lived in Montgomery, Alabama at the same time as Dr. King and Ralph Abernathy.

Fundraising Letter from Dr. Benjamin Mays to Dr. MLK, Jr.

Friday, September 28, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College sends an urgent request to alumni to assist in furnishing rooms for a newly completed dormitory. As a distinguished alumni of the college, Dr. King is requested to lend financial support to this endeavor.

Letter from J. Depre to MLK

The author addresses his concern to Dr. King regarding indications of an invasion of China by the US Military.

Adverse Letter to MLK

The author of this letter negatively expresses his opinion for Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

Letter from O. L. Sherrill to Ralph David Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

The Executive Secretary of the General Baptist State Convention of North Carolina requests multiple copies of the program from Dr. King's funeral service.

Telegram from Charles Morris to MLK

Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL

Mr. Morris, president of The Negro Business and Industrial Association, extends an invitation to Dr. King to participate in an initiative designed to combat the rioting in Negro communities.

Centennial Edition of The Nation

Wednesday, February 17, 1965
New York, NY

James J. Storrow, Jr., Publisher of The Nation, invites Dr. King to advertise in its 100th anniversary edition. Storrow suggests that Dr. King could write an article on SCLC's achievements and services to the community within the advertisement.

Letter from Lee Wood to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
Texas (TX)

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King concerning civil and human rights. Mr. Wood seeks to create a third political party and asks Dr. King for any information that will help him meet his goal.

Postcard from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967
JORDAN

The Mayor of Jerusalem sends Dr. King a panoramic postcard of the city.

Letter from Philip M. Segelin to MLK

Wednesday, July 29, 1964
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Philip M. Segelin, Member of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights School Board, informs Dr. King that he has read Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" and that said publication has provided enlightenment on the issue of civil rights. He recommends that Dr. King look into having a paperback edition published to widen distribution.

Letter from MLK to A. Phillip Randolph

Monday, April 13, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King writes A. Philip Randolph to acknowledge the need for future strategic planning in the civil rights movement.