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Letter from Marguerite Munson to MLK

Wednesday, September 14, 1966
London, England, Los Angeles, CA, Texas (TX)

Mrs.Munson writes Dr.King to ask for his assistance in finding a lawyer that is not corrupted by the government.

Handwritten Notecard regarding "Rule of Faith"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the "Rule of Faith." This is an example of the many notecards Dr.King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968
California (CA), Chicago, IL, Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C., Arizona (AZ), Maryland (MD), Selma, AL, Detroit, MI, Philadelphia, PA, Atlantic City, NJ, Texas (TX), Cincinnati, OH, Cleveland, OH, Los Angeles, CA, Tennessee (TN), GERMANY, CONGO / ZAIRE, AUSTRALIA

An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.

Why We Chose Jail Rather Than Bail

Dr. King outlines eight principal reasons why he and others chose "jail rather than bail." One of the reasons was the idea to appeal to the conscience of their opponents.

MLK Note Card - "God"

On this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "God," Dr. King evokes an interpretation that would suggest the reverse of existentialism (existence before essence).

Restorationism

Dr. King defines restorationism.

Telegram from Delmer Brown to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965
Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Berkeley, CA

Due to recent student activities at the University of California, Berkeley, Mr. Brown requests Dr. King's involvement in a lecture series devoted to discussing issues concerning civil disobedience.

Progress

Dr. King writes that progress has to do with value in human life.

Dr. King's Notes on Ministry

Dr. King explains his perspective on the path of ministry as a career. In this brief paragraph, he notes that ministry is a very noble career but it is also difficult.

Letter from Howard Moore, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Howard Moore, a partner in the Law Offices of Ward, Moore and Alexander, informs Dr. King of the establishment of the Southern Legal Assistance Project (SLAP). Mr. Moore describes how SLAP has already achieved a victory in representing a soldier who was accused of cursing his white officers. He also asks Dr. King to consider being named as an adviser for the project.

Letter from Viva Sloan to MLK

Tuesday, June 19, 1962
Kentucky (KY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

Viva O'Dean Sloan commends Dr. King on his efforts, but calls on his support to promote denominational integration of religions.

March for Poor People

Washington, D.C.

This document outlines the problem of poverty in America and suggests active participation as the only answer to the issue of poverty. The author argues that the March of Poor People to Washington is an opportunity to become involved in the effort to counteract poverty in America.

Letter from Anderson Davis to MLK

Thursday, October 3, 1963
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at West Virginia's Emancipation Proclamation centennial celebration. Mr. Davis informs Dr. King that the event is an opportunity to collect contributions for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Bacon

Dr. King notes Alexander Pope's characterization of Francis Bacon.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."

Letter from David Davis to MLK

Tuesday, October 5, 1965
FRANCE, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Davis, Executive Director of American Center for Student and Artists, invites Dr. King to speak for one of their "Meet the Press" evenings in Europe. Davis also provides the names of previous speakers and information regarding the Center's participants and programs.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bouwman

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
NETHERLANDS, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Madame Bouwman for the enjoyable interview conducted in Holland. Dr. King states he will be returning to Holland in July of 1966 and would be interested in meeting again.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Joan Daves urges Dora McDonald to provide notice of Dr. King's public appearances to Harper so that books can be sold at those events.

The Urban Coalition

Friday, March 1, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Texas (TX), New York, NY

The Urban Coalition's weekly report from the National Coordinator details the newly introduced bill which provides $150 million for summer jobs and anti-poverty programs. The report further discusses the monetary inadequacies for programs involving employment, education, and recreation. A proposal is established by the Office of Economic Opportunity to adhere to the summer programs.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, GHANA, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, TANZANIA, NIGERIA, ANGOLA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, INDIA, Georgia (GA)

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

Letter from Maria A. Mochulski to MLK

Pittsburgh, PA, Atlanta, GA

Duquesne University requests that Dr. King provide information for the candidate he is supporting for the presidential elections of 1968. The universities Choice '68 committee is interested in having Dr. King speak to the student body.

Letter from Bette Zugerman to Rev. Abernathy, SCLC

Saturday, April 27, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. Zugerman writes Reverend Abernathy to introduce an enclosed document which she suggests is the "one and only non-violent answer to alleviate the suffering of all people."

Existentialism

Dr. King explains the philosophy of existentialism.

Letter from Annon M. Card to Robert L. Green

Monday, November 14, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Annon Card, vice president of Texaco, assures Robert L. Green that an investigation is being conducted regarding the circumstances stated in Green's previous letter.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, CANADA, BELGIUM, FRANCE, GERMANY, ITALY, SWITZERLAND, NIGERIA, New York, NY, EGYPT, ISRAEL, Pennsylvania (PA), Nashville, TN, Ohio (OH), Connecticut (CT), Denver, CO, Texas (TX)

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Altina Carey

Monday, January 8, 1962
California (CA)

Dora McDonald informs Altina Carey that she discussed his letter with Dr. King over the telephone and he looks forward to hearing from Mr. Carey after his meeting with Mr. Killens.

Letter to MLK from VP Hubert H. Humphrey

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Washington, D.C.

This letter from Dr. King is from Vice President Humphrey and references recommendations for personnel and employment opportunities.

Royalty Statement for "Strength To Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York, NY

This royalty statement reference royalties from Dr. King's french-language edition book, "Strength To Love", published by Castermann s.a.

Gods Existence

Abstract: Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Statement by MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL

In this statement, Dr. King enforces the mission and organizational structure of the SCLC as a means of denouncing the traditional ideas associated with the "Black Power" slogan.