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Letter from Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis to MLK

Friday, August 25, 1967
Oregon (OR), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis invite Dr. King to speak to the students at University of Oregon.

Correspondence: Letter from Joan Daves to MLK- October 14, 1963

Monday, October 14, 1963
New York, NY

Here Mr. Daves advises Dr. King to accept an offer presented to him for the Dutch rights of his novel "Strength to Love" then references two copies of the proposed contractual agreement.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, February 18, 1965
CANADA

Dr. King writes Murray Thomson expressing his inability to accept an invitation to be a consultant for Thomson's organization's conference in Portland, Ontario. He explains that due to his commitment to the civil rights struggle he can only accept a limited amount of engagements.

A Resolution Directed to the African Methodist Episopal Church

Ohio (OH), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Florida (FL), Cleveland, OH

This resolution endorses the appointment of Donald Jacobs as Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter from Wilma Fondel to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, ISRAEL

Wilma Fondel expresses interest in attending Dr. King's pilgrimage to Israel.

Why the Christian Must Oppose Segregation

This draft examines segregation and the reason Dr. King deems it his responsibility to discuss the matter.

Letter from Chester S. Williams to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
Indiana (IN), VIETNAM

Mr. Williams, a member of the executive committee of his local branch of the NAACP, expresses his displeasure at NAACP Executive Director Roy Wilkins attacking Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Los Angeles, CA

In a statement to the Democratic National Convention, the authors of this document proclaim that they are seeking freedom. They say that immediate change will only come if the elected Chief Executive is committed to giving life to the Constitution. In an attempt to achieve this, they request that all of the Presidential nominees meet the people's delegation.

Invitation to President Johnson's Inauguration

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King receives an invitation to attend and participate in the Inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson and Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey.

Letter from the National Committee To Combat Nazism to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Chicago, IL, Louisville, KY

Rabbi S. Burr Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, sends Dr. King a resolution on civil rights that was passed at their fourth annual conference in Chicago. The resolution formally announces the organization's support of the Civil Rights Movement.

Invitation from the United Federation of Teachers to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

The United Federation of Teachers invite Dr. King to their annual Spring Conference Luncheon. At this particular event, civil rights activist Bayard Rustin will be honored with the John Dewey Award.

Letter from Lady Bird Johnson to Sally Stengel

Sunday, October 4, 1964
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

Lady Bird Johnson thanks Mrs. Stengel for the sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt.

Vietnam and Beyond

New York (NY), VIETNAM

This program for the Ecumenical and Community Conference held at the Thornfield Conference Center in Cazenovia, New York, highlights leaders from across the globe invited to attend the conference. These leaders were invited to support the efforts in Vietnam and assess policies regarding the country.

Levels of Love

Sunday, May 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, FRANCE

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

OEO Moves to Aid Hungry Families in Seven States

Wednesday, May 3, 1967
Washington, D.C., Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN)

The Office of Economic Opportunity initiates a new Food Stamp Loan program that will enable impoverished families to purchase "much needed" food.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Benjamin E. Mays

Monday, May 4, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Wyatt Tee Walker informs Benjamin E. Mays that an advance copy of Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," is being sent in appreciation of Dr. Mays' support.

God

Dr. King references the book of Job by discussing the immense and power of God.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Nomination Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. King

Tuesday, September 10, 1963
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays notifies Dr. King that he has nominated him for the Florina Lasker Civil Liberties Award.

Statement Regarding the Passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964

Dr. King gives a brief statement regarding the importance of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964.

Adverse Note to MLK on Political Cartoon

Birmingham, AL

This anonymous critic of Dr. King described their grievances on a political cartoon from The Birmingham News that referred to Dr. King as a hypocrite.

Letter from Mrs. Ross D. Davis to MLK

Monday, February 14, 1966
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Davis invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker for the Women's National Democratic Club.

Telegram from MLK to Rabbi Abraham Heschel

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Dr. King writes Rabbi Heschel indicating that he will happily serve as a sponsor of the nationwide campaign to end bombings in Vietnam.

Note Card on Democritus' Metaphysics

In this notecard, Dr. King writes on the subject of Metaphysics, focusing on the works of Democritus.

Trent, Canons and Decrees of the Council of

ITALY

Dr. King records some thoughts on the Decrees of the Council of Trent regarding the Catholic Church's response to the Protestant Reformation.

Letter from Dottie Hughes to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, October 27, 1964
ZAMBIA

Mrs. Hughes, a resident of Zambia, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She informs Dr. and Mrs. King that their efforts are being recognized in Africa.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

Sunday, January 1, 1961
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

Outline Regarding Jacques Maritain

Dr. King outlines in great detail Catholic philosopher Jacques Maritain's views on: communism, democracy, politics, and the relation between church and state.

Letter from Robert E. Harding, Thomas H. Weddington and Celestine B. Bailey to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967
New York, NY

Robert E. Harding Jr., Thomas H. Weddington, and Celestine B. Bailey detail the many allegations of racial discrimination involving employees from the National Labor Relations Board. These issues have conflicted with the Equal Employment Opportunity and the Civil Service Rules and Regulations. Harding, Weddington, and Bailey request Dr. King's assistance to correct this issue.

Letter from MLK to Robert Weaver

Monday, August 21, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes HUD Secretary Robert Weaver to discuss issues regarding urban conditions and economic development.