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Dr. King cites Albert C. Knudson.

Dr. King cites Albert C. Knudson's Doctrine of Redemption as a source for Henri Bergson's view of free will.

Address by MLK to Southern Association of Political Scientist

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issues of poverty, unemployment, education, health, and housing disparities within the nation. Granted, many strides have been made but there is still more work to be done. Equality has still not come full circle in regards to these social issues. Dr. King urges the people to continue the fight of social justice in all aspects of inequality.

The Conditions for Progress in Africa

Thursday, September 6, 1962

In a speech at the University of Cape Town, H.F. Oppenheimer argues that Africa was a backwards content with few achievements prior to European colonization. He also says that the struggle against colonialism is thought of exclusively in political terms, but that it should also be considered in social and economic terms. He provides possible solutions for future progress in Africa, and he charges the African nationalist to complete the work that the colonialist began.

Letter from Harvey Weeks to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Harvey Weeks writes to Dr. King to show his support for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. He also offers some advice and makes an appeal.

Kingdom of God

Dr. King notes the origin of the ideology of God having sovereign rule over the universe.

Letter from Clara Sturgas Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1961

Clara Sturgas Johnson sends Dr. King a Christmas card with an enclosed article about the integration marches in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Matthew Killian to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Matthew Killian shares his outrage with the unjustified suffering that violence creates. Mr. Killian continues by providing support to Dr. King in an interpretation of a scripture concerning Peter and the woman at the foot of the cross. In closing, Killian wishes blessings upon the Reverend for his efforts to complete his work.

Invitation from J.E.L Graham to MLK

Wednesday, July 13, 1966

J.E.L. Graham, President of the Hamilton Branch of the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to speak on the theme of Human Rights during one of the organizations quarterly meetings.

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Letter from Representative Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

Representative Weltner disagrees with Dr. King's assessment that Weltner's decision to seat the regular Mississippi delegation "was a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." Weltner also reminds Dr. King that he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Note from Joan Daves to Dr. King

Sunday, September 22, 1963

This note is to request Dr. King's signature on a contract with British publishers, Hodder & Stroughton in London for his book "Strength To Love."

Letter from James Gustafson to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

James Gustafson, President of 'O KAIROS, writes to Dr. King welcoming him to the University of Minnesota's St. Paul campus. 'O KAIROS is the campus Lutheran community of worship.

Letter from Robert Birley to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Robert Birley invites Dr. King to give an address at a program in London. Mr. Birley informs Dr. King of the four topics that will be discussed and requests that Dr. King address the topic of racial discrimination.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Sunday, November 29, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, includes a summary of several foreign contracts drawn on Dr. King's behalf for three of his books.

Letter from Senator Edward V. Long to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Senator Edward V. Long (D-Missouri) writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter concerning Long's support of the civil rights bill.

Letter from Thein Wah to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Thein Wah expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts in leading peace marches in New York, New York and San Francisco, California.

Anonymous Letter to Ralph Abernathy

Reverend Ralph Abernathy received this brief correspondence from an individual asking about a King James Bible. The note advises Reverend Abernathy to read Matthew 26:11.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King in response to a telegram sent by the Reverend protesting action be taken by the State of Louisiana against the Southern Conference Educational Fund.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. Homer A. Jack

Monday, August 30, 1965

Ralph Abernathy follows up with Dr. Jack about a conversation they had regarding funds for the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. Abernathy encloses a check from the SCLC for the fund, which will provide the family of the slain civil rights protestor with a total of $70 per month. Abernathy also confirms that the fund will also provide a scholarship to Jackson's sister.

God (Jeremiah)

Dr. King discusses the creating powers of God.

Letter from Mrs. Emma Hines to MLK

Mrs. Emma Hines offers her moral and financial support to Dr. King. As a 78 year old woman, she will not be able to join King in his march, however, states that she has some young people that might be joining.

The Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

This photograph encourages individuals to join the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom to Washington, D.C in an attempt to arouse the conscience of the nation.

Letter from C. Alexander Brown to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

C. Alexander Brown requests that Dr. King and the SCLC conduct an investigation on the conditions of black prisoners in American jails. After reading about cruel conditions in an Arkansas prison, Brown questions how many innocent black prisoners are confined.

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Monday, November 2, 1964

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

Selma Friendship Day Report

This document highlights information surrounding "Selma Friendship Day," which was a white-led counter-protest intended to offset the effects of Kingian boycotts. This counter-protest was met with a demonstration, in which 120 pro-Kingian persons were arrested and the local SCLC office was barricaded.

Full Opportunity Act Summary

This summary outlines and provides the provisions of each section of the proposed Full Opportunity Act.

Letter from Carol Thomas to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Carol Thomas writes Dr. King to inform him that she is making a donation to help with the war on poverty. Enclosed with the letter is a $125.00 check. She also explains that she received one of King's books in the mail. Ms. Thomas further inquires of the purchasing and mailing information of books made to the public.

Letter from Anwar Katib to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967

Anwar Katib, Governor of Jerusalem, writes Dr. King regarding his planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Katib assures Dr. King that he will be well-taken care of and shows sincere appreciation that he plans to visit Jerusalem.

Letter from Rosalie Montag to MLK

Monday, October 22, 1962

Rosalie Montag writes the office of Dr. King requesting biographical information about the Reverend for her feature article in the school's newspaper.

Letter from Robert L. Brandfon to MLK

Thursday, June 23, 1966

Dr. Robert L. Brandfon, a history professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, requests Dr. King's permission to include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a book for college students entitled "Readings in the History of the South Since 1900."