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"Atlanta, GA"

Letter from Richard Actis-Grande to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Richard Actise-Grande notifies Dr. King of an enclosed advance copy of Look Magazine. Actise-Grande believes that articles by Eric Sevareid, a former CBS news reporter and war correspondent, and Senator Edward Brooke will be of special interest to Dr. King.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966
FINLAND, Stockholm, Sweden, London, England, FRANCE, UNITED KINGDOM, SWEDEN

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary for Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to students regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Palmberg suggests raising funds in an effort to further Dr. King's nonviolent endeavors in America. Palmberg wrote Dr. King invitations to speak on numerous occasions.

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
Iowa (IA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, JAPAN

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Letter from Frank S. Gotshall to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968
Maryland (MD)

Frank S. Gotshall compliments Dr. King's as a "fine champion," but he asserts that the problem of race relations in America is worsening. To prevent race mixing, Gotshall proposes that each race be given its own area in which it can live.

Jesus (Did Jesus Ever Live)

Dr. King references "The Historical Jesus and the Theological Christ."

Life (Poem)

Dr. King writes down part of playwright and composer Sir Noël Coward’s song “Twentieth Century Blues.”

Letter from MLK to E. H. Lehman

Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King expresses concern regarding the illegal seating of elected representatives from Mississippi.

Letter from Mrs. Ross D. Davis to MLK

Monday, February 14, 1966
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Davis invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker for the Women's National Democratic Club.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

God

Dr. King cites "Totem and Tabu" and "The Future of an Illusion" for Sigmund Freud's view on the origin of the idea of God.

Letter from C. Sumner Stone Jr. to Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, August 8, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

"Washington Afro-American" Editor Chuck Stone forwards Rev. Wyatt Walker the resumes of individuals that might be suitable to work as a public relations specialist for the SCLC. He urges that Walker and Dr. King carefully examine the resumes and respond to "the more outstanding candidates."

Atlanta SCLC Prexy Jailed in Albany

Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

During a prayer pilgrimage in Albany, Georgia Rev. John A. Middleton, Pastor of Atlanta's Allen Temple A. M. E. Church, and 75 other religious leaders were jailed.

Telegram from Dr. L. K. Jackson to President John F. Kennedy

Indiana (IN), Washington, D.C., Berlin, Germany, SOUTH KOREA, VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. L. K. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church writes to President Kennedy regarding "barbaric" demonstrations against Negroes in the South.

Letter to Martin Luther King Jr. from Clement Alexandre 1957

Friday, October 4, 1957
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King received this letter from Doubleday & Company, regarding offering Dr. King royalties to write his first book. The owner/publisher of Doubleday, Clement Alexandre, tried to persuade Dr. King to work with them on a book that would expand his base of influence. The book would relate to issues of civil and political issues.

Metaphysics

Dr. King quotes F. H. Bradley’s “Appearance and Reality.”

Letter from Robert Sandberg from MLK

Massachusetts (MA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, ISRAEL, NORTH KOREA

Robert Sandberg criticizes Dr. King for his recent statements on the Vietnam War. Mr. Sandberg states that Dr. King's position has now undermined his effectiveness as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

S.C.L.C's Rev. Bevel Charges U.S. Gov't With Genocide

VIETNAM

This article, details the work and beliefs of Reverend James L. Bevel, a Baptist minister and field representative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Bevel claims that the United States Government is committing genocide against Negro people.

Newspaper Article about MLK

Saturday, August 21, 1965
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

In this article, Horace Sheffield responds to speculation that Dr. King will hold a "Summer Crusade" in Detroit.

Postcard from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Tuesday, September 5, 1967
Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This postcard from an anonymous author contains a newspaper clipping which was published in the Athens Daily News. In the article, Archie Moore, former light heavyweight champion, gives his views about a "guaranteed national income."

Letter from James L. Davis to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967
Texas (TX), New York (NY)

Here a retired minister offers support and good wishes to Dr. King while pleading with him to reconsider his stance on Vietnam.

Letter from Mrs. A. P. Boynton to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963
Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. A.P, Boynton, chairman of the Dallas County Voters League, informs Dr. King of unjust treatment towards colored women employed at Dunn's Rest Home. Due to physical abuse from the rest home's owner Charles E. Dunn, many of the women left. The Dallas County Voters League also requests a sewing machine from Dr. King to assist the women with "gainful employment."

Letter from MLK to F. A. Bussey

Friday, March 23, 1962
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs the National Morehouse College Alumni President that he will be unable to meet with a group of Morehouse men following his address at Howard University. His schedule is too hectic even though he would enjoy the "hours of fellowship."

The Lonesome Road

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA)

Stanley D. Levison sends Dr. King an article from The Washington Post titled "The Lonesome Road," which is a review of Dr. Kings book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Martin Duberman, the author of the article, explains Dr. King's reasons for writing the book, and Duberman also provides a favorable review of the publication.

Levels of Love

Sunday, May 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, FRANCE

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Beyond Vietnam

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, CHINA, Alabama (AL)

In Dr. Kings Beyond Vietnam address, he discusses seven major reasons for bringing Vietnam into "a field of moral vision," five things that the government should do to remove itself from conflict with Vietnam, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, and Premier Diem. Dr. King also encourages those in the churches and the synagogues to speak out against the war in Vietnam.

Miss Mahalia Jackson in Concert

Sunday, December 1, 1963
Atlanta, GA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference presents Miss Mahalia Jackson in concert, marking "another milestone in her personal dedication to the drive for complete freedom for all humanity."

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN)

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Bartley to MLK

Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King was sent this telegram from a couple who had recently heard him speak, prior to his nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem.

Letter from Fred C. Becker to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Fred C. Becker requests Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements where he plans on selling his books. Becker has published several of Dr. King's books in past.

Letter from Marry Gottesfeld to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963
New York, NY

Mary Gottesfeld, president of the Community and Social Agency Employees Union, writes Dr. King expressing pleasure in contributing more to Dr. King's organization. She also reminds him of the thousands that are behind his cause.