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"Atlanta, GA"

Letter from Mrs. Emma L. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

Emma L. Jones writes Dr. King on behalf of Third Street Bethel A. M. E. Church requesting permission to use his name and picture on their key ring project.

MLK Sermon About Courage and Cowardice

The document is a single draft page from Dr. King's larger work "Strength to Love," with annotations handwritten by Dr. King. On this page, he discusses courage and self-affirmation.

J.H. Emms to MLK

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), New York, NY

J.H. Emms offers his approval and support to Dr. King regarding his position on Civil Rights and the Vietnam problem, which were expressed at speeches in Los Angeles and New York.

Letter from MLK to Robert Weaver

Monday, August 21, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes HUD Secretary Robert Weaver to discuss issues regarding urban conditions and economic development.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, May 7, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), LIBERIA, New Jersey (NJ), Texas (TX), MEXICO, HONDURAS

Dr. Mays informs Dr. King of his recommendation to confer an honorary degree from Morehouse College on Dr. J. Curtis Dixon. Mays includes a biographical sketch of Dr. Dixon and asks Dr. King to respond to the letter with his approval or disapproval.

Letter Dated 2/1/63 from Frank Elliott to MLK

Friday, February 1, 1963
New York, NY, Brooklyn, NY

Frank Elliot is writing to notify Dr. King that he has received the revised sermon "Antidotes of Fear," and it will be in the galley proofs. Elliot states that the galley proofs will be sent to Dr. King's office no later than Feburary 7th. He wants to meet with Dr. King to discuss any problems that may arise.

The Baccalaureate Service of Keuka College

Sunday, June 16, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King gives the baccalaureate sermon for Keuka College on June 16, 1963.

An Open Letter to Congress from John H. Murphy III

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Baltimore, MD

John H. Murphy III, president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, urges Congress to pass the Anti-poverty Bill, because voting down the bill would be "cruel and inhumane."

Letter from Corinne B. Hill and Harold Stassen to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 12, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Harold Stassen correspond with Dora McDonald expressing gratitude for a letter sent a few days earlier. The letter involves a book to be written by Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. S.G. Greenstein

Monday, January 30, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King sends thanks to Mr. and Mrs. S.G. Greenstein for a contribution made to the SCLC.

Letter from E. Thomas Williams Jr. to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

On behalf of the Peace Corps Staff in Washington D. C., E. Thomas Williams, Jr. sends Dr. King a contribution to aid in the work of the SCLC. Williams also explains that many of the donors have made more than financial contributions to the civil rights movement.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to All Law Enforcement Officials

Saturday, April 1, 1961
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, President Hoover addresses all F.B.I. law enforcement officials. He discusses America's opposition to communism and describes it as an "insidious menace." However, Hoover warns that "attributing every adversity to communism" is ineffective and senseless. Instead he suggests that in order to defeat communism, it must be thoroughly studied and analyzed.

Letter from Mrs. Robert King to MLK

Ohio (OH)

Mrs. Robert King thanks Dr. King for his work and gives him a "contribution to the cause of Peace."

Letter from Anna Mull Jones to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Indiana (IN)

Anna M. Jones informs Dr. King that she will pray for him while he is in jail, but she also requests that he read the history of the United States and reread the Constitution. She asserts that the Republican Party was created for the express purpose of halting the spread of slavery.

Man

Dr. King quotes Proverbs 3:5 on human insight and knowledge and reflects upon its meaning.

Old Age

Dr. King discusses the topic of old age. He references French poet Victor Hugo quoting, "winter was on his head but eternal spring was in his heart."

Letter from James T. Hale to MLK

Tuesday, September 22, 1964
Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA

Morehouse alumnus James T. Hale invites Dr. King to speak to the community in Clarksville, Tennessee. He expresses how the majority of the community has not had the opportunity to hear Dr. King speak and asks that Dr. King provide a possible date.

Letter from David Kairys to MLK and SCLC

Saturday, June 17, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Kairys writes Dr. King to express his support of Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam War as well as Dr. King's approach to civil rights issues.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Friday, May 20, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Clark, a representative of the United States Senate, requests a written statement from Dr. King concerning a recent Bill (2993) up for election.

Letter from Harry Stern Shams to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA)

Harry Stern Shams requests a personal letter for his birthday from Dr. King.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Constance Baker Motley

Friday, June 22, 1962
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Mr. Walker informs Mrs. Motley, Associate Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, that either he or Dr. King will be in attendance at the upcoming Lawyers Conference.

Transcripts of Speeches And Statements Along The Meridith March

Thursday, June 16, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King discusses the recent violent challenge faced by the Negro and the SCLC in which they have experienced a "threat of murder." This issue has motivated Dr. King to continuously press for social change and maintain the responsibilities in Mississippi.

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Monday, March 11, 1968
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

Resurrection (Barth's View)

Dr. King quotes a passage from Hugh Mackintosh's "Types of Modern Theology" concerning Barth's views on resurrection.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964
New York, NY, FRANCE, Atlanta, GA

Dancer, singer, and actress Josephine Baker writes Dr. King to share her views on the current political climate of the United States of America. Her belief is that the best chance of retaining and continuing the progress made by John F. Kennedy is to re-elect Lyndon B. Johnson for President and Robert Kennedy as a New York Senator.

Letter from Ronald V. Wells to Crozer Theological Seminary Alumnus

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ronald V. Wells, President of Crozer Theological Seminary sends an invitation to the alumni of Crozer Theological Seminary, requesting their presence at the annual Centennial Celebration. Enclosed with the letter is a list of several conveniently located hotels in the area as well as a voting sheet.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Rubio

Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Dr. King attempts to guide Dr. Rubio to resources that will be helpful in his new endeavors.

Letter from Paul Rosing to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, Cleveland, OH

Dr. King is notified by Paul Rosing of the Borromeo Seminary College that he has been placed on the mock ballot for their "Choice 68" campaign. He asks that Dr. King submit any type of potential campaign literature, speeches and etc.

Invitation to President Johnson's Inauguration

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King receives an invitation to attend and participate in the Inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson and Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey.

Letter from Milton R. Young to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Republican North Dakota Senator Milton Young thanks Dr. King for a recent telegram expressing his views on pending voting rights legislation.