Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Atlanta, GA"

Get Well Letter from Mr. David George Ball to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958

Mr. David George Ball, Chairman of the University Lecture Committee for the Yale University Christian Association, forwarded to Dr. King this get well letter.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

Letter from Andrew W. Loewi to MLK

Saturday, October 28, 1967

Andrew W. Loewi writes Dr. King concerning his participation in attempting to put an end to the Vietnam War.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding a Publication

Thursday, March 30, 1967

In this letter Joan Daves informs Dr. King that a copy of the jacket text for "Where Do We Go from Here" is enclosed.

Teacher Exchange

Thursday, December 17, 1964

The Darien Board of Education exchange program is under scrutiny, given claims that African American teachers integrating into the majority Caucasian Connecticut school district will be unqualified to teach.

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet Featuring Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967

This document contains speeches given at the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet. Sidney Poitier, a Bahamian American actor, gives the keynote address. He makes a very compelling statement during his address asserting, "to change the world we must change men." Also featured are brief speeches by Dr. King, Andrew Young, and Dorothy Cotton.

Letter from Ronald Bauer to MLK

Wednesday, January 20, 1965

Ronald Bauer congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. As President of the Inter American University, Bauer informs Dr. King of the institution's initiatives in the quest for peace. Two international conferences, sponsored by Inter American University, engages university students from all over the world. Bauer is embarking on a plan to establish his own international university and invites Dr. King to be part of a special International Advisory Council featuring notable world leaders.

Letter from Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration to Henry Brownell

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Nonviolent Integration request a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss the federal government's plans.

Atheism

Dr. King ponders atheism by quoting a short anecdote of L.P. Jacks' shoemaker.

Letter from John Hay Whitney to MLK

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

In this letter, Mr. Whitney, Chairman for the Family of Man Award Dinner honoring General Dwight D. Eisenhower, invites Dr. King to join him and other guests on the dais.

Postcard from Clara Ward to MLK

Thursday, December 1, 1966

Ms. Ward addresses this postcard to Dr. King per her visit to Vietnam.

Handwritten notes on the Personality of God

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on personality of God. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from Arthur L. Baney to the SCLC

Thursday, June 24, 1965

Arthur Baney writes the SCLC on behalf of Eastman Dillon, Union Securities & Company regarding five shares of General Electric Company stock that was gifted to the SCLC by Mary Cushing H. Niles.

McGraw-Hill Requests MLK Comment for New Author

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

An editor from McGraw-Hill Book Company writes Dr. King to introduce the work of young African-American author Audrey Lee. The company sends him a galley copy of "The Clarion People", in the hope that he will add a positive remark to help promote the book.

Letter from MLK to Gaynette Henderson

Monday, November 2, 1964

Dr. King regretfully informs Gaynette Henderson that he will be unable to visit the sorority suite of Delta Sigma Theta during his visit to Pennsylvania State University.

Letter from Gerald G. Fenn to MLK

In this letter, Geraldine Fenn described the many ventures that occurred the previous year. Her main focus was on 4-H and combining agriculture with race relations. She felt that by understanding and respecting people from different backgrounds, it could then lead to a collective of peace and love.

Letter to MLK Requesting Aid

Saturday, September 9, 1967

In this plea to Dr. King, Mrs. Venis Whitten asks for assistance with obtaining adequate medical care and welfare, which would tremendously improve the livelihood of herself and her two grandchildren.

Outline of The Distinctions In God's Creation

This outline of Dr. King's sermon entitled, "The Distinctions of God's Creation," references Thomas Aquinas. The document suggests focusing on the central message that God created all beings and features of nature, each with its own unique form and purpose.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's understanding of viewing Christ in relation to God's character.

Telegram from W. L. Battle to MLK

Apostle W. L. Battle offers to sponsor Dr. King in a "preaching extravaganza and conference."

Telegram Invitation from President Johnson to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Mr. Alexander sends this informal invitation to Dr. King requesting that he visits with the President of the United States.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

The Christian Way of Life in Human Relations

Wednesday, December 4, 1957

Dr. King makes a speech to the National Council of Churches regarding the issue of American race relations. After school integration ... has noticed a radical change in the attitudes of African-Americans, ultimately giving birth to this mental and figurative notion of the "new Negro". He solicits the assistance and leadership of the nation's churches to take a firm stand against the rampant inequalities afflicting blacks are facing in America.

Letter from A. Martin to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

A. Martin expresses his support for Dr. King's work, but advises Dr. King not to run for President. Martin also shares his thoughts about which candidates he considers best suited for the role of President.

Letter from Yolinda Pelmore to MLK

Friday, December 8, 1967

Yolinda Pelmore, a young student, asks Dr. King how he became famous. The reading theme for her class prompted her to write.

MLK - Justice Without Violence

Wednesday, April 3, 1957

Dr. King gave this 1957 address to the Institute of Adult Education at Brandeis University in Boston, Massachusetts.

Press Release: SCLC Add New Members

Monday, October 19, 1964

The SCLC reports about the six new members added to its executive board during the Annual Convention held in Savannah, Ga.

Antiwar Slogans

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

The Spring Mobilization Committee issues a list of official slogans for Vietnam War protest placards. Groups and individuals who intend to protest are asked to use these slogans on their self-made placards with the phrase "STOP THE WAR NOW" printed at the bottom.

Letter From MLK to John R. Kellam Regarding Vietnam War

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Kellam for not only his letter but for forwarding a letter from Democratic Rhode Island Senator John Pastore. All three men oppose the war in Vietnam, and Dr. King responds that is becoming increasingly difficult to understand the reasons behind US foreign policy.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

This draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech lends recognition to the nonviolent practices of those engaged in the fight for equality and civil rights.