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Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

MLK Interview on NBC's Meet the Press

Sunday, March 28, 1965

This edition of NBC's Meet the Press featured Dr. King for a discussion concerning the Civil Rights Movement and its demonstrations. The interview was moderated by Ned Brooks and the panel featured John Chancellor, James J. Kilpatrick, Tom Wicker and Lawrence E. Spivak.

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

MLK on Student Sit-Ins

Friday, April 15, 1960

Dr. King applauds the students participating in sit-in demonstrations and states that the leaders must develop a strategy for victory. He suggests topics for discussion including: creating an organization, a nationwide selective buying campaign, training for jail not bail, further exploration of nonviolence, and taking the freedom struggle into every community without exception. These suggestions led to the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

Letter to SCLC from Lisa Goldiamond about Volunteer Service

Monday, April 15, 1968

Goldiamond, a student at Royal Victoria College, requests that the SCLC. Putting words to action, she offers to keep Dr. King's work alive by volunteering in local civil rights organizations over summer break.

Telegram from Charles Cogen to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Charles Cogen, President of the American Federation of Teachers, writes Dr. King a note expressing that there is national shame because Dr. King is in jail for defending constitutional rights. He also informs Dr. King that they are making their outrage known publicly.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK Regarding the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Thursday, July 15, 1965

In this letter, John Lewis encourages Dr. King to start a letter writing campaign to prevent the illegal election of Representatives from Mississippi. Lewis offers Dr. King assistance from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter from MLK to George Carlson

Tuesday, October 2, 1962

Dr. King responds to George Carlson's letter of recent date informing him that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at the Temple. Dr. King states that he would love to speak in Portland, but his schedule does not permit any more engagements.

Schleiermacher (Original Sin)

Dr. King records Friedrich Schleiermacher’s views on original sin.

Letter from Helen Hickey to Mrs. King

Monday, April 8, 1968

In this letter Helen Hickey sends her sympathy to Mrs. King pertaining to the loss of her husband. She also comments on the personal characteristics that she admired most about Dr. King.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs.Rousseau

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs. Rousseau was about his views on Vietnam. He believed that America's involvement in Vietnam was wrong and that the United States was on the wrong side of peace.

Plea for Help to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968

Correspondence from Presidee McCaskill requesting aid from Dr. King regarding her real estate predicament.

Letter from A. T. Gabriel to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963

A. T. Gabriel writes Dr. King enclosing monetary contributions from the Local Union and the Birmingham Committee for Civil Rights of Local 110. Gabriel asks that Dr. King acknowledge the contributions with a letter explaining the progress of his work.

Letter from Mercedes L. Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Nine year old Mercedes Lynne Johnson writes Mrs. King to offer her condolences and prayers following the assassination of Dr. King.

Dynamics

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's definition of "dynamics" from his book Systematic Theology.

Man, a Being of Becoming

Dr. King documents ideas regarding the philosophy of man. Using the metaphor of a "flowing stream," he addresses man's experience from infancy through adulthood.

Invitation from J.E.L Graham to MLK

Wednesday, July 13, 1966

J.E.L. Graham, President of the Hamilton Branch of the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to speak on the theme of Human Rights during one of the organizations quarterly meetings.

Telegram from Thich Nhat Hanh to MLK

Thich Nhat Hanh expresses his support for Dr. King and conveys his desire to meet with Dr. King during his upcoming visit to Atlanta.

Letter to Dorothy Height from Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Dora McDonald apologizes to Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, for not responding sooner to let her know that Dr. and Mrs. King would be unable to attend the Premier Life Membership Dinner. The invitation to the dinner came during Dr. King's sabbatical to write a new book.

Declaration of the World Council of Peace on Vietnam

Monday, February 12, 1968

The World Council of Peace issued this press release declaring their position against the Vietnam War. They state that they are pro-peace and against American oppression and that President Johnson is ignoring their peace proposals.

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

Telegram from Mrs. Ernest Bavely to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960

Mrs. Bavely sends a supportive telegram to Dr. King during his confinement at the Fulton County Jail. She assures him "children of tomorrow, tomorrow, and tomorrow, will inherit those values for which you are striving."

Letter From Emma Kramer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 28, 1965

Emma Kramer writes Dora McDonald concerning a cancelled contract for Dr. King. Kramer emphasizes how imperative it is for a letter to be written on Dr. King's behalf providing an explanation as to why he is unable to fulfill his commitment.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Supporters

Ralph Abernathy, Treasurer of the SCLC, informs SCLC supporters of Dr. King's newly published book, "Strength To Love." He explains that Dr. King has assigned a large portion of the royalties to further the work of the SCLC and urges supporters to order the book.

Immorality

Dr. King cites a quotation from the book entitled "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy. Mr. Tolstoy includes a dialogue between two characters in the book that discuss immorality. One character references "Hender's Theory" to expound upon the reality of life and death.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

The Unlimited Christ

Dr. King outlines three ways in which God is limited.

Dignity Is the Best Way

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

The Atlanta Constitution writes about Dr. King serving a five day sentence for contempt of court in Birmingham.