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"Atlanta, GA"

Anonymous Letter from Jail - Birmingham, AL

In this letter an anonymous writer shares his gratitude for all the support extended as Dr. King and his colleagues were incarcerated at a jail in Birmingham, AL.

Pamphlet on Benjamin E. Mays

Benjamin E. Mays, the President of Morehouse College, is highlighted in this pamphlet.

The Role of the Church

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

Letter from Tetsuo Kohmoto to MLK

Thursday, June 3, 1965

Tetsuo Kohmoto, president of the Shinkyo Shuppansha Protestant Publishing Company, inquired to Joan Daves about publishing Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love," in Japanese. Mr. Kohmoto happily informs Dr. King that the Japanese edition of his book has now been "published to the reading public in Japan."

Letter from David R. Echeldfer to MLK

David Echeldfer sends a copy of the Time Magazine with Dr. King on the cover and requests his autograph, and for King to return the magazine by mail.

MLK Announcement of Rally to be held in San Francisco

Dr. King announces the details for a rally in San Francisco, California to garner support for the pending Civil Rights Bill in Congress. He makes a call to action for various diverse groups to join in this initiative.

Letter from MLK to US Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall

Friday, March 23, 1962

Dr. King writes Stewart Udall, US Secretary of Interior, to thank him permitting the use of the Lincoln Memorial for the 100th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The event would come to be known as "The March on Washington," site of Dr. King's most famous speech.

The Student Voice: The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Newsletter

In this issue of The Student Voice, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee writes about the progress being made in the Civil Rights Movement, including recent ... desegregation of all public golf courses in Mobile, Alabama and the desegregation of lunch counters in Atlanta, Georgia.

The Crisis in America's Cities

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Dr. King provides an analysis of "social disorder" and a plan of action against poverty, discrimination and racism in Urban America. Dr. King states that, "If the soul is left in darkness, sins will be committed."

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

Letter from Richmond Rudden to MLK

Wednesday, October 20, 1965

Richmond Rudden, Chairman of the Lectures-Concerts Committee to Lafayette College, invites Dr. King to speak at the college during the 1966-1967 academic year.

Letter from Ada M. Field to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Ada M. Field is a ninety-year-old woman who sent Dr. King her contribution for the year. Ms. Field praised Dr. King, and the SCLC, for continuing to fight for freedom and for bringing a positive light to the process.

Letter from Governor Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

Governor Nelson Rockefeller encloses a contribution of $5,000 to the SCLC and discusses the forthcoming voter registration drive in which the SCLC will conduct.

Telegram from Dorothy Height to MLK

Saturday, December 5, 1964

Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, sends Dr. King well wishes.

Letter from John F. Steinman to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

John F. Steinman commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership and encloses a check for the SCLC and SCLF.

Letter from Lyman Cady to MLK

Wednesday, July 5, 1967

Lyman Cady, of Westminister Presbyterian Church, expresses his support for Dr. King's recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" He also commends Dr. King's overall leadership throughout the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Reverend Casper Glenn to MLK

Friday, August 30, 1963

Rev. Casper Glenn, president of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, writes to Dr. King regarding rights to a recording of the "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

Letter from Robert Bialek to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Dr. King informs Mr. Bialek of a creative arts festival named "The Artists of Conscience." Local artists who are not in favor of the administrative policy in Vietnam initiated the festival. Mr. Bialek also requests that Dr. King send him a list of Negro artists who may be interested in participating in the festival.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to Editors of the New York Times

Monday, August 20, 1962

In this letter, Mays addresses the editors of the New York Times about an article on equal employment opportunity. Mays states that he was not consulted by the article's author. As a result, he was misquoted. Mays uses the remainder of the article to clarify his position on equal employment programs.

Telegram from Rev. Harold Carlson to MLK

Thursday, September 19, 1963

Reverend Harold E. Carlson sends words of encouragement to Dr. King. Carlson prays for continued strength and courage for King's "holy cause."

Letter from Shinichi Oshima to MLK

Fifteen year old Shinichi Oshima of Japan, writes Dr. King expressing his admiration and appreciation for the movement and the black man. He also discusses his religious views and his desire to help black men in Africa.

Letter from George W. Haley to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

In this letter George W. Haley extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at a public meeting. He also comments on a speech that Dr. King gave in Kansas.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Martin Fischer at the Theological Seminary of Berlin

Monday, September 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks Dr. Fischer and the faculty at the Theological Seminary of Berlin for awarding him with an honorary degree. He expresses that the honor gives him courage to strive on and wishes them multiple blessings from God.

Letter from MLK to A. Phillip Randolph

Monday, April 13, 1964

Dr. King writes A. Philip Randolph to acknowledge the need for future strategic planning in the civil rights movement.

Correspondence: Letter to Dr.King from Miss Marelda G. Fontenot (Jan. 8, 1965)

Thursday, January 7, 1965

In this letter Marelda Fontenot encloses a copy of the school paper, "The Paraclete." The paper features an article about Dr. King receiving the Nobel Peace Price. She offers her sincere gratitude and admiration for Dr. King and his accomplishments.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Hassell

Dr. King addresses Mrs. Hassell's questions regarding Pope Paul's quest for peace.

A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse

This pamphlet is from Dr. King's undergraduate alma mater, Morehouse College. The President of the institute, Benjamin E. Mays, is the author of , "A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse" which outlines the progress made during his presidency.