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A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Notecard Listing Various Scriptures from Isaiah

Dr. King lists numerous scriptures from the Old Testament book of Isaiah related to the topics of righteous living, anger and sin.

Letter from Rev. S. A. Owen to MLK

Friday, November 13, 1964

In this letter, Reverend S. A. Owen of the Tennessee Baptist M. & E. Convention congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from Governor Edmund Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Governor Brown writes to Dr. King protesting the brutal treatment of Negro citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Monday, January 28, 1963

Irv Kupcinet, columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times, offers Dr. King recognition for his appearance his TV show. He thanks Dr. King for his significant contribution to the overall success of the program.

Letter from Mary Hart to MLK

In one of three letters Mary Hart sends Dr. King, she thanks him for his efforts in assisting poor people in America. Hart says that she is representing all poor people and sends apologies that she will not be present for the March of Poor People to Washington.

Social Ethics

This biblical scripture, deriving from the book of Deuteronomy, suggests that people who assist the poor will be blessed.

Anaximander

Dr. King documents background information on Greek philosopher Anaximander. Over five note cards, he outlines key principles of Anaximander's philosophy under the subject titles "Metaphysics" and "His Views on Biology."

Letter from Martha Williams to MLK

Wednesday, March 31, 1965

Martha Williams, who serves as the Acting Secretary of "The Zippers," a Chicago-based social and charity club, forwards a donation to the SCLC. She discusses the recent march from Selma to Montgomery when Alabama guardsmen respectfully removed their helmets during a prayer at the culminating rally. Williams extends a special prayer of protection for Dr. King and civil rights workers.

H. Rap Brown Requests SNCC Support

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's New York office of International Affairs, requests support during the August 27, 1967 boycott of General Motors. After declaring itself a Human Rights organization, SNCC requests support in the worldwide struggle for human rights, especially black liberation schools in the United States.

Fiercely Upward and Other Newspaper Articles

This document contains a combination of two poems by a principle in Brooklyn, N.Y., and two articles highlighting significant upcoming events of 1963 and 1964. The first article announces the third printing of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" as well as information regarding the release of his forthcoming work "Why We Can't Wait." The second article reports on Mrs. Medgar W. Evers' speaking tour slated to take place in the fall of 1963, just a few months after her husband, the NAACP leader, was slain.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In this column, Dr. King speaks of the outbreak of "Nazi-like degeneracy" less than 15 years after the Holocaust. He says that in spite of these evils, it should not discourage us from coming together as human beings, living in harmony and not letting the dangers of racism paralyze us as a world community.

Letter from L.S. Saxet to MLK Regarding Support for James Meredith

In this letter, L.S. Saxet encourages Dr.King to support James Meredith in his run for Congressional office. Saxet claims that to vote another candidate into office would result in embarrassment for the Negro people.

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.

Hegel

Dr. King documents a quote from philosopher Thomas Hegel regarding God and knowledge before commenting with his own thoughts.

Letter from Chester Bowles to MLK

Tuesday, December 31, 1957

Chester Bowels writes Dr. King requesting the use of his quotes to submit to the Saturday Evening Post. Mr. Bowels also regrets to inform Dr. King that he cannot join the national committee to raise funds to fight for Negros voting rights in the Southern states.

Manuscript by MLK dated 2/3/62 entitled "People in Action"

Saturday, February 3, 1962

In this 1962 draft for his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King emphasizes that school desegregation and the Rosa Parks incident are crucial turning points in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from H. L. Wynter to Dora McDonald

Monday, May 17, 1965

H. L. Wynter writes to Ms. McDonald stating new developments regarding Dr. King's visit to Jamaica in hopes that Dr. King and Mrs. King can adjust.

Letter from The Canadian Council of Christians and Jews to MLK

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

National Executive Director Richard Jones invites Dr. King to speak in Toronto during the celebration of Canada's centennial birthday. Jones describes current racial relations and acknowledges that the centennial events could be used to spur "advances toward complete equality."

Dr. King's Response to Mrs. W. Bascom

Friday, October 17, 1958

In this letter, Dr. King responded to the get well correspondence sent by Mrs. Willie Bascom. Dr. King took the opportunity to thank her for the kind donation sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He also acknowledged his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Sin

Dr. King cites a scripture from the "Book of Isaiah" referencing the universality of sin.

God (His Love)

Dr. King quotes Borden Parker Bowne's "Studies in Christianity" on God's infinite love for humanity.

Letter from Rev. Milton Reid to MLK

Tuesday, January 28, 1964

Rev. Milton Reid invites Dr. King to Petersburg, Virginia to be the speaker at the 190th Anniversary of the First Baptist Church. Rev. Reid mentions to Dr. King that the church holds historical significance because meetings about abolishing slavery were held at the church by Nat Turner and John Brown. Reid asks Dr. King to suggest another speaker if he is unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, January 13, 1964

Joan Daves writes Dr. King regarding an incomplete document that he signed for the "English tax people." For his convenience, she encloses a pre-written letter to send to England once the document is officially completed.

Letter from Burt Nelson and Hilda Nelson to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

Burt and Hilda Nelson write Dr. King requesting five copies of his address of April 5, 1967.

Suffering

Dr. King cites chapter 5, verse 7 of the Old Testament book of Job. This scripture highlights the fact that trouble is necessary in life.

Schedule for Oslo Trip

This itinerary outlines Dr. King's schedule leading up to the Nobel Peace Prize Award Ceremony. The itinerary includes flight arrangements, speaking engagements, interviews, sight seeing, press conferences and tourist activities.

Freedom (Of Choice)

Dr. King quotes Thomas Huxley's "Collected Essays" on the freedom to do right and to do wrong.

Letter from Rev. R.T. Eissfeldt to University of Illinois President Dr. David D. Henry

Thursday, January 28, 1965

Rev. R.T. Eissfeldt thanks Dr. David Henry, President of the University of Illinois, for forwarding to him Dr. King's letter pertaining to the SCLC's summer project.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Kjelle Eide

Monday, January 29, 1968

In this letter Dr. King is expressing regret to Kjell Eide for the continued difficulty in organizing the peace mission. He currently aims to focus on the organizational plans for domestic issues, but would still consider a proposed alternative.