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Letter from MLK to Zelma George

Wednesday, November 6, 1963
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

Dr. King thanks Zelma George and her husband for their hospitality while he visited Cleveland.

Letter from S.W. McAllister to MLK

New York (NY), Norfolk, VA, Georgia (GA)

Mr. McAllister, a father of three, requests Dr. King's assistance in obtaining a divorce from his wife who is living with another man. Dr. King was an image of hope for many people and often received requests for help in areas unrelated to civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gus Efroymson

Thursday, January 28, 1965
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Mr. Gus Efroymson for the contribution of $100.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Schleiermacher and Original Sin

This note card documents a passage from Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith" regarding original sin. Dr. King's note collection contains many cards that reference the theologian's work and ideas.

Letter from Ronald V. Wells to Crozer Theological Seminary Alumnus

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ronald V. Wells, President of Crozer Theological Seminary sends an invitation to the alumni of Crozer Theological Seminary, requesting their presence at the annual Centennial Celebration. Enclosed with the letter is a list of several conveniently located hotels in the area as well as a voting sheet.

103:15 General Correspondence 1967 (R)

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Reich suggests that Dr. King join the "other side" since he feels that the government is on the wrong side.

Letter from MLK to Arthur Evans

Thursday, May 11, 1967
Colorado (CO)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for Dr. Evans' contribution to the SCLC. He goes on to state the importance of the supporters contribution, so that the initiatives of the SCLC can continue to flourish.

MLK's Crawfordville, Georgia Speech

Monday, October 11, 1965
Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King rallies the people to keep pushing forward with nonviolent actions to gain freedom and dignity as human beings.

Science

Dr. King quotes a statement from A.D. Ritchie's "Civilization, Science and Religion" regarding the limits of science. Ritchie contradicts the idea that science can do "anything and everything."

John Cowles Views on Asia

Dr. King records the views of John Cowles, chairman of Look magazine and president of the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. Cowles stated that the US is losing its grip on "the minds of men" worldwide, thanks in part to the US' inability to express sympathy for the Asian community after World War II.

Dialectical Theology

Dr. King outlines dialectical theology, an approach to theology in Protestantism. King discerns that the "dogmatic arise primarily out of the demands of the religious consciousness."

SCLC Answers Attorney General Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Clayton releases a statement concerning accusations made against Dr. King. In the statement, Georgia Attorney General Eugene Cook states that Dr. King refused to give him information him concerning a known communist named Jack O'Dell. Dr. King confirms that he has, in fact, cooperated with Cook and that O'Dell no longer works for the organization.

Transcripts of Speeches And Statements Along The Meridith March

Thursday, June 16, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King discusses the recent violent challenge faced by the Negro and the SCLC in which they have experienced a "threat of murder." This issue has motivated Dr. King to continuously press for social change and maintain the responsibilities in Mississippi.

Letter from Shelia Mills to MLK

Sunday, December 13, 1964
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Shelia Mills, a 7th grade student, commends Dr. King for his efforts within the nonviolence movement and for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Judith Ann Jones Writes Mr. Ralph Helstein Inquiring About Consideration for a Scholarship.

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
California (CA), Chicago, IL

College Student Judith Ann Jones writes Ralph Helstein, President of United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers, about the Russell H. Bull Scholarship. She explains how she plans to use the scholarship to further encourage others to be more racially tolerant.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Harold L. Sawyer

Friday, June 26, 1964
Ohio (OH)

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Sawyer that he finds it difficult to schedule appointments more than three months in advance due to his hectic schedule, and cannot accept his invitation to speak at Hiram College at this time.

Letter from Nathan P. Feisinger to MLK - 3/21/1968

Thursday, March 21, 1968
Wisconsin (WI)

Dr. King sent this letter to Professor Nathan P. Feinsinger to recommend Miss Barbara Jean Williams for the Russell Bull Scholarship.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Ohio (OH), New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Letter from Charles Chew, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 31, 1966
Chicago, IL

Charles Chew Jr., of the Chicago City Council, has invited Dr. King to join him for a radio interview regarding the topic of "Crash Program on Slums."

Letter from Harriet Davis to Dr. King Regarding Eugene Peterson's editorial

Sunday, July 30, 1967
Georgia (GA)

In this letter, Harriet Davis informs Dr. King that she is a white women who has decided to teach at a Fairmont High School, which was formerly completely Negro. Although she has received criticism for her decision she proclaims that her motivations are right. She then informs Dr. King that she fears not being able to understand her co-workers and students.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN)

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, May 18, 1965
JAMAICA, Ohio (OH)

Ms. McDonald writes a representative of the University of the West Indies to outline details regarding Dr. King's trip to the school. She confirms that Mrs. King will be traveling with Dr. King, provides their arrival times, and requests that the university does not schedule Dr. King for any additional engagements outside of the Valedictory Sermon.

Letter from Mrs. Presley Layer to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968
Florida (FL)

As a member of the Urban League and other civic organizations, Mrs. Layer expresses her concerns about the conduct of marches verses a more militant tactic. Mrs. Layer asserts that we live in a violent nation and is concerned that violent pacifist will become uncontrollable. She concludes with informing Dr. King she is an admirer and long supporter of the SCLC.

Letter from Mrs. Robert Hall to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
New York (NY)

Mrs. Hall suggests a letter writing campaign for young people as a more effective and less intimidating means of demonstrating than petitions and marches.

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962
New York, NY

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

Those Who Fail To Speak

Saturday, June 5, 1965

Dr. King discusses the stagnant progress of desegregation despite the fact that a decade has passed since the Supreme Court's ruling on Brown v. Board of Education.

Let My People Vote

New York, NY, Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Svend Eril Stybe

Friday, February 7, 1964
DENMARK

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak in Copenhagen, Denmark at the request of the Student Association. He graciously turns down the invitation stating that he has made the "firm decision" to spend more time in the American South in order to focus on civil rights work.

MLK Requests Federal Protection from US Attorney General

Friday, February 19, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Dr. King sends this urgent request for protection to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Negro citizens were brutalized while protesting the arrest of James Orange. Alabama State Troopers prevented protestors from seeking medical attention by refusing to allow them to leave Zion Methodist Church.

God

Dr. King uses a verse from the Book of Nehemiah to illustrate God's faithfulness.