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Letter from Vera Galanter to MLK

Monday, January 15, 1962

Mrs. Galanter informs Dr. King of mobilization efforts in the North to aid in "Negro Voter Registration programs in the South" and requests areas in need of support.

Letter from Andrew Young to James Bevel and Dave Delliger

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Andrew Young writes Revered James Bevel and Mr. Dave Dellinger confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at a rally in New York, New York on April 15th. Young further addresses logistical issues that may arise in the execution of the event, as well as how to best increase participation.

Definition of History

Dr. King explains a definition of history.

Telegram from Theodore Brown to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Mr. Brown confirms the departure date for the Nigeria Peace Mission with Dr. King.

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Rev. J. Martin England

Friday, May 5, 1967

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Rev. England that Dr.King spent a few days in the hospital. She asks for Rev. England to send the insurance forms for Dr.King to complete.

Letter from Eileen Coyne to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Second grader Eileen Coyne sends condolences to the King family. She and her classmates were instructed to write letters to Mrs. King to express their feelings following Dr. King's assassination. This document is a part of a collection of sixteen letters from this Bronx, New York classroom.

Post Card Front from Alice and Jun Hayakawa to Coretta King

The Hayakawa family send this photo greeting to Mrs. King, addressing her as "Corrie." The family expresses their concern for Mrs. King and hopes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King following a recent accident.

Letter from Dora McDonald to F. Newton Miller

Tuesday, February 9, 1965

In Dr. King's absence, Dora McDonald writes F. Newton Miller concerning Dr. King's appearance in Rockville Centre on February 21. McDonald encloses a copy of a letter sent to Mrs. Rose R. Silvers of the Rockville Centre Commission to clarify the misunderstanding.

National Committee to Combat Nazism's Resolution on Civil Rights

Sunday, May 28, 1967

The National Committee to Combat Nazism passed this resolution, affirming the Civil Rights Movement and agreeing to send Dr. King and President Johnson a copy of their stance.

Letter from Client's Law Firm to MLK

Tuesday, September 20, 1966

Green, Ayers, Swigert, and Cluster write a letter to Dr. King requesting that he speak to Randolph T. Blackwell and encourage him to acknowledge receipt of a poem.

The Baccalaureate Service of Keuka College

Sunday, June 16, 1963

Dr. King gives the baccalaureate sermon for Keuka College on June 16, 1963.

MLK Confidential Memorandum

Dr. King outlines the SCLC's direct action program for the communities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery.

Letter from Steve Addams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Steve Addams writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for Dr. King's work. Addams also offers his condolences for the death of Martin Luther King, Sr.

Salute to Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tuesday, December 11, 1962

This program for "Salute to Martin Luther King Jr." features a performance by the entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr. and an address by Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Herbert Schaltegger

Friday, May 22, 1964

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Schaltegger's letter in which he asked for Dr. King's reaction to his theory of equality. Dr. King responds by discussing the injustices committed against Negroes in America and how they have been denied Constitutional rights.

Statement of the Committee for Emmett Doe

The Committee for Emmett Doe issues a statement both explaining Doe's situation and also asking for support. Doe, an Army paramedic, faced court-martial for allegedly cursing a white superior. He was later acquitted of the charges.

Telegram from Mrs. Adams and Son to MLK

Sunday, September 21, 1958

Mrs. Adams and her son wish Dr. King a "speedy recovery."

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

Telegram from Dorothy Height to MLK

Saturday, December 5, 1964

Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, sends Dr. King well wishes.

Statement by MLK

Monday, March 4, 1968

Dr. King warns the United States about the possibility of downfall should the federal government fail to change its policies. He sets a date for the SCLC to go to Washington D.C. and lead nonviolent demonstrations with the purpose of eradicating racism and poverty in America.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, February 11, 1963

Benjamin E. Mays invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Founder's Day Banquet at Morehouse College.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Edwin B. Allaire's Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Mr. Allaire informs Dr. King that there are many individuals who would vigorously support him in becoming a presidential candidate.

Letter from Aubrey Brown Jr. to MLK

Monday, June 26, 1967

Aubrey Brown Jr., Editor of "The Presbyterian Outlook," asks Dr. King to provide a statement regarding the obligations American voters have to choose "officials who have high personal moral standards." The statement will be used in the publication's annual "Going to College" Handbook.

Suffering

Dr. King notes his thoughts on the question of the Biblical prophet Habakkuk: "why do the wicked prosper?"

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, June 3, 1964

In this letter dated June 3, 1964, Joan Daves sends Dr. King two copies of his contract for for his book entitled "Why We Can't Wait". The terms for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait" have already been cleared.

Reservation Request Letter from Morehouse

Monday, February 13, 1967

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, President of Morehouse College, writes Dr. King to inform him of the school's upcoming "Centennial activities." Hoping both he and Mrs. King will attend, he kindly urges Dr. King to RSVP immediately for the event on Friday evening. The writing on the letter indicates that Dr. Mays' request was answered via telephone.

News Release Regarding Birmingham Shooting at Liberty Supermarket

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

This SCLC press release was issued in the wake of a violent episode in Birmingham, Alabama on February 21, 1966. That night, 23 year old Emory W. McGowen drove his car into a group of protesters before opening fire on the crowd wounding five people. The protest, called by Hosea L. Williams, was against Liberty Supermarket, a business being targeted for employment discrimination. The release contains information regarding the incident and includes pertinent quotes from Dr. King, Mr. Williams, and local minister and witness Rev. Wood.

Letter from Charles Chew, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 31, 1966

Charles Chew Jr., of the Chicago City Council, has invited Dr. King to join him for a radio interview regarding the topic of "Crash Program on Slums."