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Letter from Jan H. Jansen to MLK

Saturday, January 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway

Jan Jansen writes Dr. King a letter inquiring about him speaking at one of their meetings.

Letter from James Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee for the Improvement of Public Schools, requests Dr. King to "contact citizens protest." The protest is for blacks who are highly qualified for positions and have been turned down.

Letter from MLK to G. Lawrence Jones

Monday, December 23, 1963
LIBERIA

Dr. King writes G. Lawrence Jones distressed that Jones doesn't have the funds to pursue higher education. King states, "Our troubled world needs very much for young men with the courage and foresight you display to receive every chance to develop your full potential."

Letter from Thelma Larkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966
Chicago, IL

Miss Larkin, a disgruntled landlord, expresses her concern for Dr. King's initiative against slum lords. She feels his war on slum lords is a bit misguided in that it takes responsibility and accountability away from those she calls slum tenants.

Letter from Congressman Phillip Burton to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Washington, D.C., California (CA), VIETNAM

Representative Burton, a Democrat from California, commends Dr. King for the speech he delivered at the Spring Mobilization. The congressman says Dr King has "served the cause of peace."

Letter From Don Slaiman

Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Don Slaiman of the AFL-CIO encloses a brochure titled "The Right to Strike and General Welfare." This brochure, which was developed by the Committee on the Church and Economic Life of the National Council of Churches, address problems and proposes solution to the Labor Movement.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

"Race Hate and Divisiveness"

This newspaper clipping depicts Dr. King's decision to move the civil rights movement up north as "one of grave peril to everyone concerned." The author believes that the defiance of the law could cause disaster for the Negro cause.

Covenant Between Operation Breadbasket and The A&P Company

Chicago, IL

The Chicago Unit of The A&P Company seeks to build a relationship with the Negro community by implementing equal opportunity employment policies. In return, the ministers of Operation Breadbasket will bring to attention the extensive commitment the A&P Company has to the economic and social future of the Negro community.

Letter from Charles H. Percy to MLK

Chicago, IL

U.S. Senator Charles H. Percy expresses his appreciation for Dr. King, while also expressing his hope that the senate will soon pass a housing bill.

MLK Statement Before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Monday, October 23, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King makes a public statement before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder. He addresses five causes of the recent riots: hite backlash, unemployment, discriminatory practices, war, and features peculiar to big cities.

We Would See Jesus

Sunday, May 7, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, GREECE

Dr. King gives this sermon to a congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He conveys a message of Christ's acceptance of all despite any person's wrong doings in the past. He also points out that Christ's work is exemplified through individual acts of kindness and helping others.

Letter to Rev. Malcolm Calhoun to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968
Virginia (VA)

Dr. King appreciates Rev. Calhoun's concern for the SCLC and the mission the organization has for the creating equality. Dr. King then explains how other programs offer contributions to the SCLC so that they may continue to engage in education, voter registration, economic development, and training of ministers for urban ministries.

Letter from Harry Denman to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Nashville, TN

Mr.Denman writes Dr. King to share words of support and encouragement as Dr. King prepares to turn himself over to the Birmingham officials. Denman suggests that Dr.King should turn this event into a major demonstration.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

Tuesday, October 1, 1963
HUNGARY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, SOUTH AFRICA, New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), DENMARK, Connecticut (CT), Tallahassee, FL, Orangeburg, SC, Louisville, KY, Brooklyn, NY, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York, NY

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

Eartha, Verbal Tempest, Flies to Los Angeles

Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, Los Angeles, CA, New Jersey (NJ), Kansas (KS), Oklahoma (OK)

This article references statements made by entertainer Eartha Kitt during a White House luncheon for women. Kitt expressed her concerns about the impact of the Vietnam War on American families and their sons.

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
Washington, D.C.

U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey commends Dr. King on the work of the Urban Coalition. He also informs Dr. King of his intent to work together to meet common goals.

U.S. Vice Presidential Address

Friday, June 24, 1955
Washington, D.C.

These Excerpts from a Vice Presidential address made on June 24, 1955 boast the claim of moving all Americans closer to achieving the American Dream regardless of race, creed or color. The vice President lists five reasons for the success of the Eisenhower Administration in emproving equal opportunities for all Americans, including Negroes.

Letter from MLK to A.S. Grant

Dr. King thanks Elder Grant for the kind remarks from his previous letter and lets him know that due to the business of his schedule as the President of the SCLC, he is unable to devote attention to Grant's proposal.

1965 Annual Board Meeting for SCLC

Thursday, April 1, 1965
Baltimore, MD

This document details the agenda at the Annual Board Meeting for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

CORE List of 33 Lunch Counters With Unchanged Policies

Monday, February 20, 1961
Alabama (AL), North Carolina (NC), Arkansas (AR), South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Virginia (VA)

This document is a CORE list of cities where lunch counter demonstrations have been ineffective.

Meister Eckhart

Dr. King outlines a brief history of German mystic philosopher Meister Eckhart.

MLK's Address to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Monday, October 12, 1964
Missouri (MO), INDIA

This address by Dr. King was delivered to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity the day before it was announced that he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In addressing the topic "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution," Dr. King argues that the church must inspire it's members to be active and advocate against injustice, reaffirm the misconduct of racial segregation, and work towards social change in a nonviolent and peaceful manner.

Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

Letter from High School Student Jeanne Adams to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL

Joanne Adams, a student from Central High School, writes Dr. King to voice her support for what he is doing for negro citizens in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Jacob Hoffman to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Pittsburgh, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Jacob Hoffman, principal of M. Hall Stanton Public School, requests that Dr. King record on a tape a few inspirational words for the graduating sixth grade class. Mr. Hoffman, also, mentions a new project called the, "New Dimensions Project," which is to inspire students to achieve higher standards.

Letter from Nathaniel L. Hawthorne to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

Nathaniel Lee Hawthorne, who describes himself as “a nonviolent militant Negro” from rural Virginia, asks Dr. King for advice on publishing a book. Hawthorne wants to tell the nation what it feels like to be poor

Letter from Harper & Row to Joan Daves regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 11, 1964

Harper & Row informs Joan Daves about the receipt of the quote on Dr. King from Harry Golden, Editor of the Carolina Israelite.

Telegram from Wyatt Tee Walker

Saturday, July 28, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Walker sends out this telegram to inform its recipients that Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy have been unjustly arrested in Albany, Georgia.