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"BAHAMAS"

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

Letter from Abdul Razak Ahmad to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966

Abdul Razak Ahmad requests a message of support from Dr. King for an upcoming event. Ahmad is the president of the University of Singapore's Socialist Club. This letter praises Dr. King for his leadership and also discusses racial problems in Singapore.

Song of Solomon

Dr. King discusses the biblical book Song of Solomon and asserts that it contains minimal significance and little, if any, religious value.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Leon R. Martin

Monday, August 12, 1963

SCLC Director of Research and Information Harry Boyte communicates with Leon Martin to thank him for the thoughtful words made in response to Dr. King's article in "The New Leader." Boyte tells Martin that Negroes in America are at a place where they will no longer be forced to wait for equality. Boyte asserts that only the complete participation of Negroes in every part of life in America will "suffice at this juncture in history."

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

Tuesday, October 1, 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

March 1968 Dr. Marin Luther King Jr. drafts a letter of gratitude for Richard Gardner.

Sunday, March 24, 1968

Dr. King drafted a letter of gratitudefor Richard Gardner. Mr. Gardner contibuted a donation of one hundred dollars to the SCLC. Dr. King also, outlines some of the programs in which the SCLC engages in as well as it's principles of non-violence.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

Letter from MLK to Johnie Lee Halle

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Dr. King informs Mr. Halle that he has no intention of linking the Civil Rights Movement to the peace movement. He asserts that the Vietnamese have consistently been the victims of colonialism, and argues that war and violence are not acceptable means of resolving conflicts.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 31, 1962

The Gandhi Society for Human Rights lists the names of individuals whom they would like to serve on the organization's Board of Directors in which Dr. King serves as the Honorary President.

Letter from John to MLK

John discusses some points on religious ethics with Dr. King and offers gratitude for a Labor Day dinner with the King family.

Draft of a Speech Regarding the Chicago Freedom Movement

This is a draft copy of Dr. King's speech on the Chicago Freedom Movement. The intention of this movement is to end slums in Chicago. Dr. King calls upon the poverty-stricken Negro, the middle class Negro, and the white community for assistance with this movement. Dr. King also states that years after the March on Washington, he has seen his dream turn into a nightmare due to the murders of civil rights activists.

Letter from Alan Sapiro to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Alan Sapiro, Public Relations Officer of Bankers Trust Company, writes Dr. King enclosing a letter he wrote to the New York Times that contains comments the Reverend made during a Peace Rally press conference at the United Nations.

God

Dr. King writes about Chapter 11 of the Old Testament Book, Hosea, concerning Israel.

Letter from James McKee to Dora McDonald Concerning MLK's Antioch Commencement Address

Friday, April 2, 1965

James McKee, Chief of the Yellow Springs Police Department, writes Dora McDonald regarding security arrangements for Dr. King's visit to Yellow Springs, Ohio for Antioch College's Commencement.

Note from Mrs. Phyllis J. Sundquist to MLK

Mrs. Phyllis Sundquist encourages Dr. King to continue his stance against the Vietnam War for the betterment of the United States.

Letter from Robert W. Fischer to MLK

Monday, January 27, 1964

Robert Fischer is a collector of autographed TIME magazine covers that feature famous personalities. He requests the cover with Dr. King's portrait, so that he may add it to his growing collection.

Reservation for Official Inaugural Book

This is the reservation form for the 1965 Official Inaugural Book in honor of Lyndon Baines Johnson and Hubert Horatio Humphrey.

Scripps Howard: Dr. King Asks LBJ to Do As Hero FDR Did

Monday, January 15, 1968

Tom Talburt reports in this article that Dr. King urged President Johnson to create jobs and provide for the disadvantaged in order to prevent another summer of riots, such as the Los Angeles Watts Riots of 1965.

Knowledge

Dr. King refers to Ecclesiastes 1:18 which says that increased knowledge brings increased sorrow.

Letter from Jack Malpas to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1961

Jack Malpas, a member of the Episcopal Church's Society for Cultural and Racial Unity, contributed financially to the SCLC. Mr. Malpas informs Dr. King that he is working on the appeal for the Prayer Pilgrimage and expresses his previous experience in Jackson, Mississippi.

Calvin Kytle to Head Information Center for Urban America

This press release revelas that Calvin Kytle will head a new national information center for Urban American, Inc.

Pilgrimage to Nonviolence

Dr. King's essay "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" provides a replete account of the thinkers, ideas and sentiments responsible for his pledge to nonviolence.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

MLK Interview: The Negro Protest

Kenneth B. Clark conducts a televised interview with Dr. King, James Baldwin, and Malcolm X. Clark discusses with Dr. King his personal history, the relationship between the love ethic and nonviolent direct action, Malcolm X's claim that nonviolence is perceived by white leaders as weakness, and Baldwin's concern that Negroes will not remain nonviolent if met with brutal responses.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This letter addressed to Dr. King criticizes his beliefs in equality and justice. The anonymous author states that "we are living under devil law" and "justice belongs only to the devil." He or she continues, arguing that schools corrupt children, filling their brains with "devil wisdom and devil justice and devil love."

Telegram Request to MLK on the Kennedy Assassination

Thursday, December 5, 1963

This Western Union Telegram was sent to Dr. King from Tokyo, requesting commentary concerning John F. Kennedy's assassination for the magazine Midorikawa.

Telegram from Marshall L. Shepard to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Rev. Shepard, pastor of Mount Oliver Tabernacle Baptist Church, offers words of encouragement to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in Bessemer, Alabama.

Letter of Condolence from Jerry K. Bolton

Thursday, April 4, 1968

Mr. Bolton expresses his heartfelt sympathy for the "unjust loss" of Dr. King.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from Frank Thompson, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Congressman Thompson of New Jersey writes Dr. King to acknowledge his recent letter urging his support of the vote against the Mississippi Delegation. Thompson informs Dr. King that he was one of Representatives who opposed the seating, and although dissenters did not prevail he is convinced "that this action has helped in the fight to enfranchise those who have been discriminated against for so long."