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"BAHAMAS"

Letter from MLK to Rev. Stanley Terry

Wednesday, October 10, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Reverend Terry of New York for his witness in Albany, Georgia.

Telegram from Lavinia Underwood to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965
Boston, MA

Lavinia Underwood writes Dr. King to discourage the possibility of a march that could strain relationships with white people.

MLK's Gadsden, Alabama Rally Speech

Friday, June 21, 1963
Alabama (AL)

This transcript of Dr. King's address during the Gadsden, Alabama Rally addresses the ills of segregation in the South. He professes that the accusation of civil rights demonstrations being responsible for creating tension is equivalent to blaming the act of robbery on the wealth of man.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Monday, April 17, 1967
New York, NY

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

Letter from Representative James H. Scheuer to MLK

Wednesday, February 24, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Congressman James Scheuer (D-New York) writes Dr. King that he believes progress is finally being made in Selma, Alabama, and he congratulations Dr. Kin on his excellent leadership.

Christian Responsibility in a Nuclear Space Age

Saturday, February 27, 1960
Los Angeles, CA

The Church Federation of Los Angeles conducted the Christian Responsibility in a Nuclear Space Age Seminar, for which Dr. King was the keynote speaker.

The Dilemma of White America

Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

Original Sin

From "The Epistle of the Romans," Dr. King records Karl Barth's observations regarding original sin, which are compared to views of the Bible, Saint Augustine and the Reformers.

Telegram from C. Dolores Tucker to MLK and Others

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Philadelphia, PA

C. Dolores Tucker offers some words of encouragement to Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker during their incarceration in the Birmingham City Jail.

How My Theology Has Changed

Dr. King highlights seven main ways in which his theological views have changed since his final year at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Invitation from the United States Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. king is invited to participate in the National Conference on Race and Education by the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

Letter from Rev. Allen Clark to MLK

Texas (TX)

Rev. Allen Clark sends Dr. King words of encouragement and requests a copy of a book regarding Dr. King's faith.

Letter from Atlantiv Human Resources to MLK

Wednesday, July 13, 1966
Atlantic City, NJ, New Jersey (NJ)

The officers of Atlantic Human Resources invite Dr. King to be the guest of honor and main speaker at their second Annual Meeting.

Aristotle's Psy

Dr. King writes about Aristotle's views on the soul.

The Gary Crusader: The World of Books

Saturday, June 24, 1967
Indiana (IN)

This review of Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" highlights his examination of the Black Power movement as well as his emphasis on non-violence.

Messianic Hope

Dr. King writes these notes on "Messianic Hope" from Isaiah 11:6 and 11:8. He quotes Ludwig Feuerbach, a German philosopher, from his work "The Essence of Religion."

Suggested SCLC Organizational Structure

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This document outlines the preliminary organizational structure of SCLC with brief descriptions of roles and responsibilities.

A Big Johnny Reb Special Editorial

Sunday, April 9, 1967
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Big Johnny Reb Radio Show, a show syndicated throughout the State of Georgia, criticizes Dr. King for his position on the Vietnam War. The management of the radio station agrees with the view that too much American blood has been spilled, but they also state Dr. King should not denounce his own country's cause in the fight against Communism.

Press Release and Interview from Radio Norway

Wednesday, December 9, 1964
Oslo, Norway

Dr. King addresses the press the day before receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in a statement from Radio Norway.

Telegram from Newcastle University to MLK

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
UNITED KINGDOM

The registrar of Newcastle University inquires if Dr. King would be able to accept an honorary degree from the institute.

International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace

Thursday, December 15, 1966
UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, GERMANY, CANADA, INDIA, SWEDEN, NORWAY, ISRAEL

Kenneth Lee, President of the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace, asks Dr. King if he would consider becoming a sponsor for the organization.

Letter from Victor J. Schoenbach to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Victor Schoenbach writes Dr. King expressing his support for Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War in the midst of dissenters.

MLK Manuscript: Why We Can't Wait

This document reflects one page of the original manuscript of "Why We Can't Wait." "Why We Can't Wait" is a book by Martin Luther King, Jr. about the civil rights struggle against racial segregation in the United States, and specifically in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Nelson A. Rockefeller

Monday, November 1, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Governor Nelson Rockefeller for taking the pulpit at Ebenezer Baptist Church for their Men?s Day Observance. He appreciates the Governor?s contribution of $25,000 to their tax exempt Society to match his own donation from the Nobel Peace Award.

Letter from MLK to Margaret Flinsch

Friday, January 5, 1968
New York, NY

In this letter to Mrs. Margaret Flinsch, Dr. King personally thanks Flinsch for her generous contribution to SCLC and explains how her support benefits SCLC's efforts.

Letter from Anna Hedgeman to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. Hedgeman writes Dr. King to express her support for Dr. King's quality service that he has given America. He then targets Dr. King on a letter he received on the representation of the slogan "Black Power." Dr. Hedgeman feels the slogan relates strongly towards extremists and black supremacy. Lastly, she encloses a small contribution and two letters.

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr's views on God as outlined in "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Burn Baby Burn: Problems of the Urban Ghetto

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This letter from the Georgia Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union announces a cocktail reception for Aryeh Neier at the Wit's End.

Notecard Regarding Capitalism

This notecard quotes Walter Rauschenbusch's thoughts on capitalism.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, October 31, 1966
Louisville, KY, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Cincinnati, OH, Tennessee (TN), West Virginia (WV), Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Kentucky (KY)

The SCEF Executive Board asserts that the attack of black power is injuring the plight of democracy in the United States. The SCEF board declared "the idea of black power has a long and honorable history but it is currently being misrepresented in the news media in the United States."