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Nobel Peace Prize Congratulations 1/7/1965

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

In this letter, George Fish is congratulating Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Alabama State Teachers Association to MLK

Thursday, March 30, 1967

On behalf of the Alabama State Teachers Association, Joe L. Reed expresses appreciation for Dr. Kings visit during their Annual Convention.

Out of the Long Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958

Missions Magazine published various articles concerning the baptist ministry and how the church is impacting its surrounding community. Dr. King contributed to the magazine by writing an article entitled "Out of the Long Night of Segregation." In the article, he writes about the nonviolent methods being used to end segregation in America.

Letter from SNCC Executive Committee to MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

John Lewis and Silas Norman of SNCC write Dr. King to address their organization's grievances with the SCLC, specifically the SCLC's lack of cooperation in the Selma Voting Rights campaign. Members of SNCC state their disagreement with the march planned for March 7, 1965 because "the objectives of the march do not justify the danger and the resources involved." Lewis and Norman request a meeting with Dr. King to discuss reconciliation between SNCC and the SCLC.

Rio Grande Farm Workers Bulletin

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

This bulletin describes the difficulty that migrant farm laborers have encountered forming organizations to improve economic conditions.

Letter from Keith Black to MLK

Sunday, May 8, 1966

Keith Black, on behalf of the Valley Community Presbyterian Church, sends Dr. King a check for the SCLC.

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

Letter from John Lazenby to MLK

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

John Lazenby, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, encloses a donation to Dr. King. He further stresses that nonviolence is the prime method to solve problems around the world. Lazenby requests copies of Dr. King's anti-war speech delivered at New York's Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 to distribute to his friends.

Funeral Service: Grand Master John Wesley Dobbs

Saturday, September 2, 1961

This program outlines the funeral service of Grand Master John Wesley Dobbs. Mr. Dobbs established a number of civil rights organizations in the Atlanta area and was considered to be a close friend and confidant of Dr. King.

Letter from Congressman Herman Toll to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

Pennsylvania Democratic Congressman Herman Toll thanks Dr. King for his letter and assures Dr. King that he will continue to seek strong civil rights legislation.

Negro Pioneers: Booker T. Washington

Lucille A. Chambers tells the story of Booker T. Washington's rise in society from his birth in Virginia to his founding of the Tuskegee Institute and the Negro Business League.

Huntley Thomas Writes MLK About His New Production

Thomas Huntley tells Dr. King that he is the first in Atlanta to get a copy of his new production and asks for Dr. Kings opinion.

Soap, Brush Help

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College for 1944-1948

Tuesday, November 7, 1950

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College from 1944-1948.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, responds to Dr. King's telegram regarding the assault of Rev. Paul Chapman. Marshall informs him that evidence has failed to disclose any "violation of a federal criminal statute," so the Department of Justice is unable to take action.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

Letter from Nathaniel L. Hawthorne to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Nathaniel Lee Hawthorne, who describes himself as “a nonviolent militant Negro” from rural Virginia, asks Dr. King for advice on publishing a book. Hawthorne wants to tell the nation what it feels like to be poor

Letter from Eleanor A. Lofton of the Pittsburgh Courier to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Eleanor Lofton, Acting Publisher for the Pittsburgh Courier, asks Dr. King to include a message for the "Brotherhood" edition of their publication. Lofton explains that they are seeking "all men of goodwill" to be a part of the edition and that they will be anticipating his timely response.

MLK's Final Exam for Social Philosophy

Monday, May 28, 1962

Dr. King's final exam for the Seminar in Social Philosophy class he taught at Morehouse College from 1961-1962.

Memorandum Regarding Civil Rights Complaints

Robert Greene, John Griffin and Ralph Scott make a claim against the state of New York, asserting that they were denied their civil rights and treated unjustly.

Essay on Violence and Nonviolence

The impractical and immoral effect of violence and testimony to the moral power and efficiency of nonviolence are discussed in this essay. Violence is recognized as achieving social justice with great results, but not without damage to society. Although a much tougher way of seeking social justice, nonviolence is a more satisfying lasting solution.

Letter from G. Campbell-Westlind to MLK

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

G. Campbell-Westlind, Acting Consul General of the Royal Consulate General of Sweden, informs Dr. King that Simon & Schuster has asked the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm for permission to print his Nobel Award Acceptance Speech. The letter requests Dr. King's comments on the proposal.

MLK: A Profile In Leadership

Outraged by recent allegations, civil rights leaders rally to unify their support of Dr. King and his position on the War in Vietnam. This document encourages his supporters to unite for a common purpose.

Letter from Helen Paul to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Helen Paul of Follett Publishing thanks Ms. McDonald for informing Dr. King of her request to publish several of his speeches.

Dynamics

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's definition of "dynamics" from his book Systematic Theology.

Letter from Robert Hatch to Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 25, 1965

Robert Hatch, a staff associate with the National Education Association, asks Miss McDonald to inform Dr. King of an invitation to speak at the organization's banquet in New York City. Hatch mentions that he is not only a former Morehouse classmate of Dr. King's, but also lived in Montgomery, Alabama at the same time as Dr. King and Ralph Abernathy.

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Chas. E. Elmore

Tuesday, July 30, 1963

This letter dated July 31, 1963 was written by Dr. King to Mrs. Chas Elmore. In it he thanks her for the kind letter she wrote to him about his letter from the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK about Request

Monday, October 26, 1964

Alfred Duckett writes this letter to Dr. King in order to remind Dr. King of his desire to have a magazine article or television special done on him and stresses the need to present Dr. King's role "not only as a civil rights leader, but also as a father, pastor, husband, and administrator of a steadily-growing national organization." Mr. Duckett also presents the terms of a proposed publishing contract, should he wish to become a part of the project.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to General James M. Gavin

Friday, March 29, 1968

Harry H. Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes to General James M. Gavin, regarding a previously postponed meeting with Dr. King. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the necessity of Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Tyrone Little to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Tyrone Little expresses his sympathy to Mrs. King after the death of Dr. King, and he explains that his school plans to hold a mass.