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Letter from Robert Bialek to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Dr. King informs Mr. Bialek of a creative arts festival named "The Artists of Conscience." Local artists who are not in favor of the administrative policy in Vietnam initiated the festival. Mr. Bialek also requests that Dr. King send him a list of Negro artists who may be interested in participating in the festival.

Marvin Wachman Invites MLK to Speak at Lincoln University

Friday, August 16, 1963

Marvin Wachman, President of Lincoln University, invites Dr. King to a speaking engagement.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson he will not be able to speak at the upcoming conference in Portland, Ontario due to commitments for the Civil Rights Movement in the US and his pastoral duties for Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.

People in Action: The Solid Wall Cracks

Friday, March 22, 1963

In this draft of an article for the April 13, 1963 New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the cracks in the wall of segregation in Albany, GA: first the city’s closure of segregated public facilities to avoid protests by the Albany Movement, then the repeal of segregation from the city’s code.

Letter to MLK from Vice President Hubert Humphrey

Thursday, June 15, 1967

In this letter, U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his support and applauds him for all his hard work, while commenting on fair and decent housing.

Letter from The Very Rev. Raymond J. Swords to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Fr. Raymond J. Swords, S.J., President of the College of the Holy Cross, writes to Dr. King, expressing how joyous he was to hear that King was selected as the 1964 Nobel Prize Winner.

Letter from Charles S. Joelson to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Joelson of New Jersey responds to Dr. King's recent letter urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. He informs Dr. King that he shares his view and was one of the 148 members who voted against it.

Letter from Jay Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 24, 1964

Jay Richard Kennedy congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He also comments on the importance of international recognition for the current struggle for equality.

Letter from MLK to Ohio Senator Frank J. Lausche

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senator Frank J. Lausche (D-OH) for his support in passing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Senator Lausche also served as Governor of Ohio.

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1963

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, informs Dr. King that his department is inquiring into events in Greenwood, Mississippi that Dr. King brought to his attention. He assures Dr. King that the Justice Department will take appropriate action with respect to any violations of federal law.

Letter From Elizabeth Green to MLK

Monday, October 28, 1963

Elizabeth Green informs Dr. King of the news stories covering his appearance at Mount Holyoke College and encloses copies of the stories.

Letter of Gratitude and Concern from Eulah M. Eubank to Charles R. Baker of IAD

Sunday, February 18, 1968

In this letter Eulah Eubank points to an urgent situation. Hence, Eubank writes with the intention of receiving resources to continue the fight against injustice. Finally, she communicates her sustained commitment to volunteering with the Anti Defamation League and Open for Opinion via radio monitoring.

A Message from Heaven by Eugenia Singleton

In honor of Dr. King's death, Ms. Eugenia Singleton composes this poem. Throughout the piece, Ms. Singleton makes several parallels between Dr. King and Jesus Christ.

MLK Drafted as a Presidential Candidate Announcement

The Peoples Committee of America drafts Dr. King as their candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election.

Letter from Beryl Bugatch to MLK

Sunday, July 25, 1965

Beryl Bugatch of the University of Pennsylvania asks Dr. King to speak on "the governments role in enforcing racial morality."

Letter from AJ Muste to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

A.J. Muste encloses a letter from Cherian Thomas to Dr. King and references a previous telegram he sent congratulating Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Ernest Gruening to MLK

Friday, May 19, 1967

Democratic Alaskan Senator Earnest Gruening informs Dr. King that he has inserted one of Dr. King's speeches into the Congressional Record, in order to combat misconceptions about Dr. King's beliefs. The speech in question was delivered to the Riverside Church in New York, and it conveyed Dr. King's views on Vietnam. Senator Gruening includes this section of the record with his letter.

Letter from Septima Clark to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967

Ms. Clark writes Dr. King with excitement about her granddaughter's accomplishment as a tutor. After saving her earnings of $5.00 per week, Ms. Clark's granddaughter managed to purchase Dr. King a holiday gift complete with special wrapping.

Telegram from Yamanaka TV to Pete Seeger

Monday, December 4, 1967

A Japanese television host writes American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger requesting that he encourage Dr. King to accept an invitation to appear on the show.

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from Mrs. Presley Layer to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

As a member of the Urban League and other civic organizations, Mrs. Layer expresses her concerns about the conduct of marches verses a more militant tactic. Mrs. Layer asserts that we live in a violent nation and is concerned that violent pacifist will become uncontrollable. She concludes with informing Dr. King she is an admirer and long supporter of the SCLC.

Holiday Card from Iris Ambrose to MLK

Iris Ambrose Sends Dr. King a Christmas card, in which she relays a message from a Rev. Robinson.

Telegram from Bennette, Calhoun and Ellis to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

J.H. Calhoun, Ocelia Ellis and Fred Bennette send their prayers and support to Dr. King during Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from James E. Bristol to Coretta Scott King

Monday, August 5, 1957

Mr. Bristol responds to a previous invitation to attend the SCLC's Tenth Annual Convention. He informs Mrs. King of his inability to attend due to a prior engagement but trusts that the convention will make a significant impact.

Hus, John

Dr. King makes biographical notes about John Hus, the leader of the Czech reform.

Lette from Eugene Blake to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Mr. Blake informs Dr. King of his tentative schedule for the speaking engagement which, as Mr. Blake explains, will be broadcast all over Europe.