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Suggestions for Survival During Period of Prolonged Civil Disorder

This document contains a list of tips and suggested supplies for survival during a period of civil disorder, including specific food items and tools. The document recommends stockpiling enough supplies to survive for at least one month without needing to leave your home.

Subsidized Housing Project Proposal

In this proposal for an Atlanta based housing project for low income families, the terms and conditions are drawn out amongst all organizations involved. These consist of Ebenezer Baptist Charitable Foundation, the Federal Housing Insuring Office, the Housing Authority, the Federal National Mortgage Association, Mauldower and Paterson, Joe Robinson and James S. Robinson. Additionally, Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. and Jr. are described in a brief biography as reference to the leadership involved in the undertaking.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Arthur Flemming

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for Mr. Flemming's contribution to the SCLC. He states that because of the contributors continuing support, the initiatives of the SCLC can persist forward.

Letter from Norue Crickson to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Twelve-year-old Norue Crickson commends Dr. King for his civil rights efforts. He expresses that from now on he will offer his "prayers for this cause."

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

"Negro Leader Looks Down Road Ahead"

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The Augusta Chronicle wrote this extensive review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this document, the review places special emphasis on Dr. King's views on the War on Poverty, the Black Power Movement and the state of the Civil Rights Movement.

Ross Hamilton Sends MLK Support

Thursday, November 28, 1963

Ross Hamilton, 11-years-old, writes Dr. King with support and encloses money from one of his Christmas gifts.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Letter from Wilmer Young to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Wilmer Young writes Dr. King commending him for taking a stand against the Vietnam War and its connection with civil rights.

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

Sunday, September 15, 1963

Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.

Memorandum to Files

A memorandum to file was written to explain how the SCLC will proceed in a pending legal case. In the case, the plaintiff has sought compensation for a car accident in which an alleged employee of the SCLC, Major Johns, was the driver at fault. A joint decision was issued against both parties. However, the decision was rendered in Louisiana and the SCLC claims that the court lacks jurisdiction. The memorandum concludes with why the SCLC will wait to assert its claim until the plaintiff brings suit to a court in Georgia.

How Dodd Differs From Powell/Dwellings Toured

The newspaper article entitled, "How Dodd Differs From Powell," examines how differently Senator J. Dodd and Congressman Adam C. Powell were treated after a major controversy. This controversy resulted in the removal of Congressman Powell from office.

MLK Notes for Speech to the Chicago Headline Club

This is a draft of a speech Dr. King delivered to the Chicago Headline Club. The speech encompasses information regarding the difficulty the media may have covering the SCLC and the Civil Rights Movement.

Invitation from Hubb Coppens to MLK

Sunday, August 16, 1964

Hubb Coppens invites Dr. King to make an appearance at West Berlin to address the Dutch students during his time in Europe. Mr. Coppens explains that it is the schools aim to educate their students on world issues.

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr's views on God as outlined in "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from Richard L. Doerschuk to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Deputy director of the United States Information Agency, Richard Doerschuk requests that Dr. King participate in a television program to be broadcast in Africa on the topic of civil rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. W. A. Visser't Hooft

Monday, December 20, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Hooft confirming that Dr. King accepts his invitation to speak in Geneva. McDonald inquires about expenses for Dr. King and one of his aids and encloses a photograph and biography for Dr. Hooft to utilize.

Movement for Puerto Rican Independence

Pedro Juan Rua, a leader in the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, gives a speech concerning the American military presence in Vietnam. He provides a historical framework for understanding America's involvement with other oppressed nations, asserting "U.S. rulers are new Nazis. Unite to defeat them."

Letter from MLK to Rev. A. D. Evans

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Dr. King writes Rev. A. D. Evans and friends of St. Paul A.M.E. Church to thank them for their financial contribution of $500 to the SCLC. He discusses the current efforts of the organization such as Operation Breadbasket and the citizenship schools. Dr. King explains their monthly budget and the importance of supporters.

SCLC Policy-Making Board to Meet in Washington, D.C. February 6-7

Thursday, February 1, 1968

The SCLC Executive Board of Directors will hold its semi-annual meeting in Washington, D.C. They intend to discuss future projects as well as continuing projects.

Letter from Ronald H. Lind to MLK

Thursday, March 9, 1967

Reverend Ronald Lind writes to Dr. King, urging him to take a positive stand on the integrity of Representative Adam Clayton Powell.


Dr. King documents some insights regarding the history of the Roman Catholic church.

Notecard Regarding the Religion of Feeling

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines several and their views on the psychology of religious beliefs. This is an example of one of many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

"Rev. King Jumps Back into the Act"

This article expresses how Dr. King wants to take the attention off of the militants and place the focus back on non-violent expression.

Treasury Spells Out Equal Employment Requirements for Banks

Friday, February 17, 1967

This press release details the requirements for compliance with the Treasury Department's Equal Employment regulations.

Letter from MLK to Art Simmons

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King extends his gratitude to Mr. Simmons for the evening at the Palais des Sports.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, suggests a discussion concerning future writing plans. She mentions the possibility of publishing a collection that would include several of Dr. King's speeches and writings, among them the March on Washington address and the Oslo speech.

Urban Strategy Conference and Demonstration Participants

This document lists attendees of the Urban Strategy Conference who also went to a demonstration in Washington, D. C.

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.