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Professor Andrew Blane Offers Assistance to MLK

Saturday, November 4, 1967
New York, NY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Atlanta, GA

Andrew Blane, Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, offers to brief Dr. King on the role of religion in Russian culture, particularly the Russian Baptists. He attaches along with his letter, a description of his "scholarly interests and training" for Dr. King to consider.

War

Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

Letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes Stewart

Saturday, December 17, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

This document is a letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes S. Stewart pertaining to Mr. Johnson's objection to participating in the Armed Forces physical examination due to his belief that "there is a better way to solve conflicting problems that beset men".

Letter from MLK to Lester Kendel Jackson

Wednesday, July 17, 1963
Indiana (IN)

Dr. King sends a check to Dr. Jackson at St. Paul Baptist Church in Gary, Indiana, to aid with reconstruction of the church.

Letter from S. O. Adebo to Theodore Brown

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
New York, NY, NIGERIA

S. O. Adebo, a permanent representative of the Permanent Mission of Nigeria to the United Nations, requests a meeting with Mr. Brown and his colleagues. Mr. Brown is the Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa. This letter references the Nigeria-Biafra situation, which Dr. King was deeply concerned about.

Worship

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from James Bissett Pratt's "Religious Consciousness," which focuses on the purpose of the Protestant sermon. Dr. King expands Pratt's analysis to encompass the entire Protestant service.

No More Negro Cop Restrictions Asked

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Alabama (AL), New York (NY), New York, NY

These newspaper clippings feature a photo and caption of Atlanta Police Chief Herbert Jenkins regarding the lifting of restrictions on Negro policemen arresting white persons, and an article on alleged violent tactics by a labor union.

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

Moral and Religious Imperatives for Brotherhood

Saturday, February 9, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King shares how important it is for America to obtain racial integration.

A Journey of Conscience

VIETNAM, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Washington, D.C., SOUTH AFRICA, ALGERIA

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

Philosophy of Life (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes G. K. Chesterton’s “Heretics.”

Letter from Dora McDonald to Monica Wilson

Saturday, April 3, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

Dora McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, responds to Monica Wilson at the University of Cape Town in acceptance of her invitation to speak at the institution. McDonald closes requesting confirmation of a date for Dr. King, as well as accommodation information.

Letter from Pastor Paul S. Barru to MLK

Friday, May 21, 1965
Colorado (CO), Denver, CO, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

The pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Glenwood Springs, Colorado sends the SCLC a contribution on behalf of his church and the Denver Christian Center. He references a recent Wilcox County, Alabama tour which he feels reflects the type of "creative" activity that is most beneficial for exposing "a window into the rural South for the ignorant North."

Excerpt from The Drum Major Instinct

This passage quotes one of Dr. King's acclaimed sermons delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia. He defines the desire to lead as "the Drum Major instinct." Seeing himself as a Drum Major for justice, peace, and righteousness, Dr. King posits what should be said at his funeral.

Telegram from Charles Evers to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
Jackson, MS

This telegram, from board members of MAP, expresses their dissatisfaction with Dr. King's comments regarding refunding efforts of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

Letter from Bible Student to MLK

ISRAEL

The bible student who wrote this letter used biblical references to justify segregation and to persuade Dr. King to cease civil rights demonstrations.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

Letter from Clara Horner to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968
Tennessee (TN)

Clara Horner criticizes the methods of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes that instead of marching, Dr. King should work in higher education.

Letter form Dorothy Leeper to Muhammad Ali

Monday, May 1, 1967
Oregon (OR)

Dorothy Leeper thanks Muhammad Ali for his courage in standing by his beliefs. She also commends him and Dr. King for their stance against the Vietnam War.

Letter from a Disillusioned Supporter to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, Nebraska (NE), Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Ohio (OH), Pennsylvania (PA)

An anonymous author, who identifies himself as a "white Jew," explains his decision to withdraw financial support from Negro organizations and causes. The reasons for his lack of support include the death of two Jews in Philadelphia, who died aiding the Negro cause, and the rioting in cities.

Letter to T. Janama from MLK

Monday, September 20, 1965
NETHERLANDS

Dr. King thanks Mr. Janama, who sent a contribution of 500 Dutch florins on behalf Mrs. J.V.D. Pol. He also apologizes that his schedule will not allow him to accept Janama's invitation to speak in Amsterdam.

Job, Ecclesiastes and Daniel

Dr. King quotes several scriptures from the biblical Books of Job, Ecclesiastes and Daniel concerning each author's views on mortality and immortality.

Letter from Marshall C. Dandy to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Virginia (VA)

Marshall C. Dendy, the Executive Secretary of the Board of Christian Education, invites Dr. King to be a speaker for the organization's conference in Montreat. Dendy also suggests that Dr. King reconsider his stance on America's involvement in Vietnam, even though he also detests war.

To Set Our People Free

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Hawaii (HI), ETHIOPIA

This poem by Mrs. Eudora V. Savage is dedicated to the African American veterans of World War Two.

Oberlin College Commencement

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., PUERTO RICO, VIETNAM, INDIA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New Hampshire (NH)

This issue of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine features commencement articles and photos as well as Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, Dr. King’s address to the graduating class.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958
New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter from MLK to Matthew Schoenwald

Thursday, August 20, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King thanks Matthew Schoenwald and the members of the Undergarment and Negligee Workers Union for their contribution to SCLC.

Letter from Joan Daves to Earl Smith

Monday, December 5, 1966
URUGUAY, PORTUGAL, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

In this letter, a representative of Dr. King's literary work, replies to Pastor Earl M. Smith regarding Smith's interest in having the F.O.R. Committee in Rio de Janeiro, collaborate on the Portuguese printing of "Strength to Love."

Request for Message form Amalgamate Laundry Workers Joint Board

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Louis Simon is writing to Dr. King requesting a message that he may include on the souvenir program for a concert the Amalgamated Laundry Workers Joint Board will be hosting.

Letter from Lady Bird Johnson to Sally Stengel

Sunday, October 4, 1964
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

Lady Bird Johnson thanks Mrs. Stengel for the sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt.