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"BELGIUM"

Letter from Hans-Luder Temmen to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966

This document contains a request for Dr. King's autograph from Mr. Temmen in Germany.

Letter from Anonymous to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

The author of this letter expresses their concern about poverty across the United States and offers suggestions for Negros to build their own communities.

The Negro

This poem describes the strength and perseverance of the Negro during difficult times.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Martin Peretz

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

In this letter, Ms. McDonald informs Dr. Peretz that Dr. King will be able to have lunch with him and that he will be accompanied by Reverend Andrew Young, Reverend Bernard Lee and herself.

Letter from Marlyn Roach to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Marlyn Roach requests an interview in hopes of a job with SCLC, as she is disillusioned with the antipoverty programs on which she has been working. She cites the cause of the "total failure" of the program to be the difference between the Negroes' and the state and federal government's objectives.

Man

Dr. King notes the subject of man, quoting Algernon Charles Swinburne's "The Hymn of Man."

Support Correspondence from Harold Ford to MLK

Sunday, September 3, 1967

In this letter, Harold Ford stresses the importance of the movement and the need for more privileged whites to lend a helping hand. He states that everyone has a moral responsibility to ensure the welfare of man kind and no one should haphazardly turn a blind to the issues of race and economics.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inaugural Concert

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to attend a concert celebrating the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. The concert features Mischa Elman, a Russian emigre and famed musician.

Letter from Barbara W. Moffett to William Rutherford

Monday, January 8, 1968

Barbara Moffett discusses the possibility of coordinating efforts and collaborative participation between the American Friends Service Committee and SCLC.

Swedish Martin Luther King Fund

Tuesday, March 29, 1966

The Martin Luther King Fund was an internationally housed organization in which numerous countries participated in helping to support and spread Dr. King's messages. This document represents the facts and activity program of the Swedish organization headquartered in Stockholm. Included are lists of the Executive Committee, Honorary Board members, and activities designed to create a better understanding of Dr. King's work.

Letter from Ruth N. Smith to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968

Ruth Smith sends a monetary contribution in support of Dr. King's efforts for African Americans and the Civil Rights Movement. She informs him that she will not be physically present for the upcoming demonstration in D.C., but she will support him in spirit.

Letter from Maryknoll College to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968

Patrick J. Ryan, the Campaigning Committee Coordinator at Maryknoll College, requests that Dr. King provide materials such as his political views, stickers, posters and more to support his political campaign and bring political consciousness to the student body.

Letter from Hunn Guelde to MLK

Saturday, October 1, 1966

Hunn Guelde inquires about a claim made by the FBI in regards to Dr. King.

Letter from William T. McKnight to Time Magazine

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

William McKnight communicates with officials at "Time" magazine, thanking them for honoring Dr. King as their "Man of the Year." He feels that their decision to honor Dr. King also gives attention to the plight of the Negro in 1963.

Letter from Steve Allen to MLK

Tuesday, March 1, 1966

Mr. Allen forwards Dr. King a letter from Paul C. Hosfeldt in which Mr. Hosfeldt calls Dr. King a Communist. Mr. Allen believes that this letter will be of interest to Dr. King and his attorneys.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row, Publishers for MLK

This document features a royalty statement from Harper & Row, Publishers, for Dr. King's "Strength to Love."

Invitation to John F. Kennedy Funeral

Saturday, November 23, 1963

This telegram sent from The White House in Washington, invites Dr. King to participate in the funeral services for President John F. Kennedy.

Response from MLK to Paul Yeiter

Monday, January 8, 1968

Dr. King responds to Yeiter's questioning of his support of plans to boycott the 1968 Olympic games. Dr. King argues that Negro athletes have presented specific and reasonable demands to the Olympic Committee, which reflects a valid concern for the social welfare and progress of the whole nation. He commends these athletes for their determination and courageous stand against racism and injustice.

Letter from David Mays to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 28, 1963

David Mays, Chairman of the Department of Speech and Theatre at Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee, participates in a continued correspondence with Dora McDonald. Mays inquires if the speech he requested will be under separate cover, as it was not enclosed in the recent letter. He also requests Dr. King's permission to make copies of the speech in order to pass out to students in his Principles of Rhetoric class.

The World of Books

Saturday, June 17, 1967

This is a broad review of Dr. King's publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The article also notes that this was the first book Dr. King has released since his acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

Letter from Richard P. Heath to MLK

Monday, November 29, 1965

Richard P. Heath expresses his distaste for Dr. King's method of attaining equal rights and freedoms. He posits, "In order to have rights and freedoms, we must be responsible for our actions."

Letter from Eleanor Martin to MLK

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Eleanor Martin, a Sunday school teacher at Triedstone Baptist Church, praises Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love." She also invites Dr. King to visit her Sunday school class when he visits Cleveland again.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 16, 1967

Clarence B. Jones writes Dora McDonald to inform her of his travel plans to Los Angeles, California.

Letter from MLK to A.S. Grant

Dr. King thanks Elder Grant for the kind remarks from his previous letter and lets him know that due to the business of his schedule as the President of the SCLC, he is unable to devote attention to Grant's proposal.

The People Speak

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

The neighborhood residents initiate a self-reliant program entitled, "Self-Help Policy-67 Model", due to the inadequacies within the federal government's Anti-poverty Program and the War on Poverty Program. These individuals are considered "The New Breed" and are working to cease their economic disparities. They correlate the biblical story of Nicodemus to associate the promised land of economic freedom.

Letter from Edward P. Blair to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Mrs. Edward P. Blair, Executive Secretary for the Evanston Council of Churches, informs Dr. King that two enclosed checks totaling $298.78 is a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

In order to protect citizens involved in voter registration from attacks and harassment by police, Dr. King requests that President Kennedy intervene the situation in Greenwood, Mississippi.

Letter from Lenore Aikens to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Lenore Aikens congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She also asks how the Christian Citizenship Committee of United Church Women can be a part of the cause.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 31:3.

Letter from A High School Student

A white high school student writes Dr. King to encourage the continuation of demonstrations to free the Negro people.