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SCLC News Bulletin

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, ISRAEL, Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Lowndes County, AL

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

Letter from MLK to F. A. Bussey

Friday, March 23, 1962
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs the National Morehouse College Alumni President that he will be unable to meet with a group of Morehouse men following his address at Howard University. His schedule is too hectic even though he would enjoy the "hours of fellowship."

Draft of MLK's Public Statement Concerning SCLC Supporting Communism

New York, NY, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the accusation in the New York Herald Tribune that some SCLC members support Communism. He also states that the SCLC has severed ties with former member Jack O'Dell, including the fundraising that had taken place in New York.

Descartes

Dr. King quotes the French philosopher Rene Descartes on the concept of "doubt."

Letter from MLK to Ms. Yvonne Hairston

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Dr. King addresses Ms. Hairston's concerns about his opposition to the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Walter G. Pietsch to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Walter G. Peitsch asks Dr. King to support a resolution to reinstate Adam Clayton Powell to his seat in the United States House of Representatives and his Chairmanship of the United States Committee on Education and Labor.

The Student Protest Movement Special Report

Thursday, February 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Norfolk, VA, Tennessee (TN), Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Kansas (KS), Oklahoma (OK), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Regional Council outlines several facts regarding the Student Protest Movement leading up to February 25, 1960. The contents of this report include detailed examples, legal precedents and public reaction accounts. Also included, is an analysis of the conditions that caused the student protest movement, as well as ideas for solutions.

Letter from Paul R. Trumpler to MLK

Friday, May 25, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Paul Trumpler writes Dr. King expressing how he and his wife are pleased to have the chance to support Dr. King's work. They believe in Dr. King's ideas regarding racial issues and solutions. Trumpler encloses a check written out to Dr. King so he can use the money as he designate.

Letter from MLK to William Smith

Monday, July 13, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, Albany, GA, St. Augustine, FL

Dr. King thanks Dr. Smith for his contribution of $50 to the SCLC. He updates him on how much money was raised at a recent reception and details how it will be used. Dr. King also sends a copy of his latest book as an expression of appreciation.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, April 16, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, VIETNAM, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, THAILAND, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

The Integrity of Martin Luther King

Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

This letter was written in response to Dr. King's address concerning U.S. involvement in Vietnam. The address was given at the Ford Hall Forum, in Boston, MA. The author speaks to Dr. King's courage and integrity for humanity.

Pelagianism

London, England

Dr. King defines Pelagianism as the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without divine aid.

Letter from Mildred R. Morris to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 27, 1963
Cincinnati, OH

Mildred R. Morris acknowledges receipt of a letter from Dora McDonald. She expresses her excitement regarding the possibility of meeting and informs McDonald about her new rates as a Professional Placement Counselor.

Speeches by the Leaders

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISRAEL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Chicago, IL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, GERMANY, Berlin, Germany, Boston, MA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, California (CA), Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Maine (ME), South Carolina (SC), New Hampshire (NH), Colorado (CO), Tennessee (TN)

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Washington, D.C.

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
New York, NY

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 30, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mr. Shaefer requests that Dora McDonald send two mats and a second biographical sketch of Dr. King for use in two local papers to promote Dr. King's upcoming appearance in Pennsylvania to speak for the Hadley Memorial Fund. He also asks that Dr. King's lecture topic be sent so it may be added to the program for the speech.

Man

Dr. King quotes Pascal's "Pensees" in this excerpt that focuses on man's greatness.

Letter from Aileen B. Armstrong to MLK

Saturday, May 18, 1963
Berkeley, CA, California (CA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Mrs. Armstrong writes Dr. King to express her regard and deep appreciation for his work.

Letter from Vivian C. Kelley to MLK and President Kennedy

Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA

Vivian C. Kelley offers her support to Dr. King in his continued efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Mrs. Kelley shares with Dr. King a letter in which she asks President John F. Kennedy to address issues of discrimination in the United States. In response to Mrs. Kelly, Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, expresses thanks on the behalf of President John F. Kennedy and assures Mrs. Kelley the President and the Administration are dedicated to ending discrimination and securing the Constitutional Rights of all Americans.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."

Criticism of MLK's Methods

Thursday, August 24, 1967
Los Angeles, CA

The Author of this letter is very critical of Dr. King and accuses him of hating the white race and requests he return the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Letter to Ralph David Abernathy from the Church Women United in Atlanta

Friday, April 26, 1968
Atlanta, GA

President Nancy Elliott Fowler of Church Women United in Atlanta writes to express her appreciation for the "magnificent job Rev. Abernathy did in the handling of Dr. King's funeral." Fowler also conveys the organization's unanimous approval to an enclosed resolution honoring Dr. King.

Letter from L. E. Stahl to SCLC

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Ruth Stahl encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC for their commitment to improving the issues of the world. Mrs. Stahl intended to join the NAACP but decided to contribute to progressive organizations instead.

Telegram from MLK to Chris Folker

SWEDEN

Dr. King expresses enthusiasm regarding his upcoming trip to Sweden.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Friday, November 1, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Donald G. Brownlow from Department of History invites Dr. King to speak with students on the current issues of today, especially race relations in the United States. Dr. King's handwritten note in the margin indicates, "Can't go this academic year...Southern struggle."

Letter from Judy Palmer to MLK

Saturday, January 6, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Judy Palmer agrees with Dr. King concerning the traffic jam in Washington D.C, and asks if Dr. King can befriend the White House.