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Letter from Lawrence J. Rozman to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

Lawrence J. Rozman, who identifies himself as a white Catholic, is in admiration of Dr. King's avenue of execution to the racial issues in the United States. In addition, Mr. Rozman requests to become a member of the SCLC.

Letter from Jean Ward Wolff to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967

Jean Ward Wolff expresses her concern about Dr. King turning his back on truth and justice in the form of supporting Adam Clayton Powell.


Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 6:1.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

Letter from Fr. John McNamara to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

Fr. McNamara, Catholic Chaplain at the Louisiana State Prison at Angola, writes Dr. King to extend congratulations on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

DeWolf, Harold

Dr. King references Harold DeWolf's book, "A Theology of the Living Church."

Letter from MLK to R. B. Taylor

Wednesday, October 13, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. R. B. Taylor for his generous contribution to the SCLC. King discusses how the funds are allocated to assist with voter registration, education and finding jobs for blacks.

Letter from Congressman James G. O'Hara to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Congressman James G. O'Hara, US Representative from Michigan, informs Dr. King that he has signed the home rule discharge petition for the District of Columbia.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jacob Broertjes

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Dora McDonald sends Jacob Broertjes a tentative schedule for Dr. King's upcoming speaking engagement in Amsterdam with the Baptist Federation.


Dr. King highlights a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's twelve-volume analysis of the rise and fall of civilizations, "A Study of History."

Letter from MLK to Helga Gulbrandsen

Thursday, March 12, 1964

Dr. King responds to an invitation to visit Oslo, Norway under the auspices of the Norwegian Fellowship in the fall of 1964. He informs Ms. Gulbrandsen that he cannot commit to accepting the invitation due to his uncertain schedule, but assures her that he will keep her invitation on file. However, Dr. King's handwritten notes found on the letter indicate that he was unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from Ervin R. Meyer to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Ervin R. Meyer informs Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy that he is against the Poor People's March on Washington. Mr. Meyers perceives these demonstrations as attracting "law breakers" that do not reflect Christian actions. The author identifies additional organizations and expresses their opposition to the SCLC's Christian mission.

Letter from Maschera Pier-Carlo to MLK

Friday, October 6, 1967

Maschera Pier-Carlo, a citizen of Italy, writes Dr. King informing him that his book "Strength to Love" helped her understand the true value of Christian love and God.

Letter from Anthony Thompson to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Anthony Thompson, of Bethany College in Kansas, requests that Dr. King send information concerning his political and world views. Thompson intends to include the information in a program called Choice '68 on campus.

How Do You View Progress in School Desegregation?

In this rough draft of an article written by Gene Roberts of the New York Times, Roberts expresses his optimistic and realistic views of the progress being made in integrating schools.

Letter from John H. Hatcher to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

John H. Hatcher of Circle K International invites Dr. King to speak at "A Study of State Government." This event will contain several state and national leaders. The date of this document has close proximity to the Memphis march and Dr. King's assassination.

SCLC Annual Board Meeting Agenda

This 1965 SCLC annual board meeting agenda lists several key figures who are intended to discuss their respective projects and strategies during this two-day session.

Letter from Mrs. Weitzler to Bayard Rustin

Friday, January 26, 1968

Mrs. Weitzler assesses the meaning of the "March on Washington" and the impact it has had on her.

Letter from Laverne Gobble to MLK

Monday, September 19, 1966

Laverne B. Gobble encloses a publication entitled "Your Vote Makes a Difference," and informs Dr. King of the Votemobile schedule. She also expresses that if he is interested she can assist with educating members of his organization about voting.

Letter from Elisabeth T. Babcock to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Elisabeth T. Babcock writes Dora McDonald regarding Dr. King's schedule around May 8, 1965. Babcock desires Dr. King to address high school students "in support of Long Island." Babcock states that maybe Dr. King can help the children display their courage.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Anonymous Letter on Chicago Slums

Thursday, February 10, 1966

A disgusted city taxpayer from Chicago writes to Dr. King regarding the condition of slums in Chicago. It is believed that Dr. King and other leaders should stop wasting time on marches and teach young Negroes religion.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Saturday, April 11, 1964

John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and future Congressmen, writes to Dr. King to share his concerns regarding the need for an improved relationship between SNCC and SCLC.

Telegram from Mrs. King on Meaning of Christmas

Thursday, December 19, 1968

Mrs. King expresses sadness that the United States is launching a new dimension in its space program, but spends so little on eliminating poverty, hunger, disease, war and racism.


Dr. King writes on the "empty feeling" of death, citing St. Augustine's autobiographical book, "Confessions." This index card contains a quote from the work in which the philosopher reflects on the death of his closest friend.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 6, 1964

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Kerry Clayton to MLK 11/20/66

Sunday, November 20, 1966

Kerry Clayton informs Dr. King that she was asked to do a third grade report about his life. She also requested for Dr. King to send a picture to include in the report. Kerry Clayton was a resident of China Lake, California.

Letter from William Welsh to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

William Welsh objects to Cassius Clay's (Muhammad Ali) rejection to enter the draft for the Vietnam War. Mr. Welsh asks that if Dr. King agrees with this notion, he should denounce Mr. Clay publicly.

SCLC's People to People Tour

The SCLC held their Alabama "People to People Tour" from December 5-8, 1962. This itinerary lists the SCLC staff that participated in addition to the locations of their meetings.