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"BELIZE"

Letter to MLK on Anti-Semitism

Friday, November 4, 1966

M.C. Gettinger, Executive Director at the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, writes to express dismay about alleged remarks about Jews made by Hosea Williams at Spelman College.

Letter from the Seventh Grade Class of Woodward School to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Anita Davis, Gail Williams, and Joan Rockwell request an interview with Dr. King for their class project.

Letter from Joan Daves to Miss Dora McDonald

Friday, March 26, 1965

Dr. King's literary agent Joan Daves requests that Dora McDonald send her the full text of Dr. King's speech in Montgomery. She also reports on Dr. King's recent book royalties.

Letter from Fred Becker to MLK in Regard to Speaking Engagements

Monday, January 14, 1963

Mr. Fred C. Becker writes to Dr. King about his speaking engagement, lectures, and attendance at special meetings. He requested that Dr. King would send a list of speaking engagements in as advance as possible. The publishers wanted the opportunity to allow the public to be aware of his speaking schedule, so they may be able to purchase his books.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Warren Chippindale

Wednesday, July 27, 1966

Dr. King writes to respond to Mr. Chippindale's invitation to have Dr. King speak in Montreal. He states that due to prior engagements, he will not be able to accept the invitation.

Power

Dr. King cites Karen Horney's "The Neurotic Personality of Our Time.

Letter from Max Goldberg to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

Max Goldberg asserts that the interview conducted with Dr. King a year ago serves relevance for the current progression attempts for the American Negro. Mr. Goldberg is attempting to produce copies of the interview and distribute them to various cities.

Letter from MLK to Alfred Davidson

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Mr. Davidson regarding a benefit held at the Palais des Sports in Paris, France.

Introduction to an Educational Program on Nonviolence

Monday, September 26, 1966

This document explains the purpose of an educational program on nonviolence. The document then goes into specific details on the curriculum taught in the workshops for nonviolence.

Schedule for Oslo Trip

This itinerary outlines Dr. King's schedule leading up to the Nobel Peace Prize Award Ceremony. The itinerary includes flight arrangements, speaking engagements, interviews, sight seeing, press conferences and tourist activities.

We're Ready to Guzzle It, But We Ain't Ready to Make It!

George S. Schuyler uses his weekly "Views and Reviews" column to voice his opinions about the lack of economic initiative in the Negro community.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Wednesday, October 27, 1965

Dr. King defers an invitation to speak at Lafayette College until a later date.

News Release from the Presbyterian Office of Information Regarding the CDGM

The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. releases a statement regarding funding for the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM). After hearing statements from Marian Wright, the National Missions staff voted in support of funding for the CDGM. Mary Holmes Junior College has acted as the "enabling agency in channeling" money from the OEO to the CDGM.

Letter from Melvin Brisk to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Melvin Brisk, President of Quadrangle Books, requests that Dr. King read Clarence Darrow's book "Verdicts Out of Court." Brisk acknowledges Dr. King's limited time schedule and urges him to pursue a meeting with Darrow to discuss his publication.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Contracts

Friday, January 29, 1965

In this letter Joan Daves requests from Ms. McDonald the required signatures from Dr. King for the contract for the Oriya-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait," which is to be published in India.

Letter from Nancy Keppy to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1962

Nancy Keppy, a high school student from Alabama, asks Dr. King to share his thoughts on integration and segregation.

Letter from Executive Director of Catholic Interracial Council to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

The following document is a cover letter of enclosed letters John A. McDermott sent seventeen Negro state legislators "congratulating them on their fight for fair housing".

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

In this letter, dated March 9, 1965, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays requests Dr. King's attendance at the annual Morehouse College Board of Trustees meeting.

MLK Travel Schedule

This document lists a schedule of cities and dates for Dr. King's travels.

New Wine in Old Bottles

Sunday, January 2, 1966

In a New Year's sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Dr. King addresses Matthew 9:17. His explains that new ideas or inspiration cannot thrive in closed minds or old structures, such as the idea of equality in a segregated society. While Victor Hugo's "idea whose time has come" may be here, Dr. King says, we need to "help time" and overcome the initial resistance to new ideas with persistence and a transformation of the old structures.

Letter from French Organization Regarding American Outreach

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

This letter, dated January 23,1968, was sent among French colleagues who are in support of promoting understanding and cooperation between Protestant and Catholic educationists in America and France.

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Monday, May 24, 1965

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

Registration for the Annual Youth Retreat

Friday, May 12, 1967

This is a document from Reverend Earl Stirewalt with information on the annual Youth Retreat of the Georgia Baptist Convention. The retreat aims to aid in the spiritual growth of young men and women.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

Friday, November 4, 1966

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Senator Kenneth B. Keating responds to Dr. King's previous message by providing him with a copy of a statement he delivered before the Senate passed the Civil Rights Bill.

News from Highlander Folk School

Wednesday, December 2, 1959

Beginning on January 15th, the News from Highlander Folk school will open its adult educational program. In support of the program, many renowned leaders across Amercia signed the statement.

People to People: Something Happening in Mississippi

Saturday, October 17, 1964

In this article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, a group of Negroes from Mississippi who displayed the power of nonviolence by challenging the seating of the state's all-white regular Democratic delegation at the 1964 Democratic Convention.

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

Bayard Rustin writes to Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference sponsored by the A. Philip Randolph Education Fund. The conference focuses on "The Role of Press in a Period of Social Crisis."