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Dr. Abernathy Says Full Steam Ahead in '67

Friday, January 6, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Lowndes County, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. Abernathy recaps accomplishments of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for 1966. He states several objectives for the organization's efforts for 1967.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Edward Taylor, an African American soldier in Vietnam, requests Dr. King's aid in a military justice matter.

Letter from James Bevel on the Spring Mobilization Committee

Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH), New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA, California (CA), Missouri (MO), Baltimore, MD, Philadelphia, PA, Maryland (MD), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), CANADA, Washington (WA)

James Bevel, national director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, offers insight into the purpose of the committee. The committee focuses on launching two mass demonstrations to stop the war, with the goal of "seeking to stimulate increased activity everywhere."

Letter From Dr. Fred Lange - Nielsen to MLK

Thursday, December 10, 1964
South Africa, Oslo, Norway

Dr. Fred Lange - Nielson writes Dr. King informing him of a recent appeal that was sent to several Norwegian Bishops. He also encloses a copy of an official translated 'Manifesto'.

Letter from Rev. Robert Harrison and R. H. White

Monday, February 5, 1968
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Rev. Robert Harrison and R. H. White of the New Samaritan Baptist Church inform Dr. King that they are unable to send a donation immediately, but will take up a special donation to be sent as soon as possible.

Telegram from Ike Knight to MLK

Georgia (GA)

Ike Knight notifies Dr. King about civil rights issues concerning steel workers going on strike.

Philosophy Reading List

This document serves as the reading list of various philosophers. Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and more are apart of Dr. King's philosophical reading from October through January.

Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details a budget for the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee's Project Administration component.

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Wednesday, October 18, 1967
Missouri (MO), Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Milwaukee, WI, VIETNAM, Dallas, TX

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Letter from MLK to George E. Bass

Thursday, April 7, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the Annual Luncheon for the Planned Parenthood Association.

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Georgia Attorney General Eugene Cook regrets that Dr. King has refused to reveal the names of individuals affiliated with Communist activities throughout the United States. Mr. Cook states that he will continue to investigate the file on his own accord.

Letter from I.M. Sternberg to MLK

Wednesday, December 1, 1965

I.M. Sternberg, Western Electric Public Affairs Representative, poses four questions regarding the social conditions of Blacks. Sternberg requests feedback from Dr. King in order to raise awareness and to promote social justice activism among company employees.

Draft Telegram from MLK to Federation of Teachers

New York (NY)

In this draft telegram, Dr. King addresses the Federation of Teachers enthusiastically endorsing the efforts of New York City teachers to improve their living and working conditions. Dr. King urges the teachers and parents to dispel conflict as they face a contentious Board of Education. Dr. King makes a key point informing parents that it is not the teachers "withholding education but those who have forced them to resort to desperate measures."

Letter from Eva Ban to MLK

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), BRAZIL

Eva Ban, of the Brazilian newspaper "Cruzeiro," requests an interview with Dr. King in order to do a story on American race relations. Ban also asserts that there is no racism or discrimination in Brazil.

Letter from Howard Moore Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Mr. Moore, of the Atlanta law firm Hollowell, Ward, Moore & Alexander, congratulates Dr. King on receiving of the Nobel Peace Prize. He goes on to encourage Dr. King and the SCLC to "establish a full fledge non-sectarian four year college and graduate school."

Statement by Dr. Robert W. Spike on the Mississippi Seating Challenge

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Reverend Dr. Robert W. Spike writes a statement concerning a plan to dismiss a seating challenge in the U.S. House of Representatives. Reverend Spikes discusses the political inadequacies concerning the denial of the Mississippi residents right to vote. Following the seating of the delegation, an investigation commenced to ensure the political legitimacy.

Letter from MLK to Artist Committee for SCLC

Friday, May 5, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

This letter expresses Dr. King's regards and deep appreciation to the Artist Committee for their generous contribution. He communicates gratitude on behalf of so many who benefit from the work made possible from their support. Additionally, Dr. King communicates the continued strength and effectiveness of the SCLC in promoting negro-white unity, non-violence, justice and equality.

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Friday, November 1, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. J. M. Douglas

Thursday, March 28, 1963
Virginia (VA)

Miss McDonald informs Dr. J. M. Douglas that she has discussed his invitation with Dr. King and that it will be placed in a special folder for further correspondence when there is availability in Dr. King's schedule.

Capitalism

Dr. King quotes the Honorable John Rankin's remarks regarding capitalism. He discusses two motives that make human beings work: "fear of punishment and the hope of reward."

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to John F. Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Rev. Ralph Abernathy accepts President John F. Kennedy’s invitation to meet and discuss the civil rights problem.

SCLC Direction

Thursday, November 17, 1966
California (CA)

The SCLC establishes a new direction in which they are seeking to promote nonviolence on an international level by creating a universal human rights movement. Ira Sandperl details this new direction of the SCLC which includes the improvement of current political and economic issues.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 17, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Minnesota (MN), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, New York (NY), Nebraska (NE)

Thousands of students from across the nation collectively organized a March on Washington to end the war in Vietnam. The students were attempting to voice their disapproval of the war and asked that conscientious individuals join them.

Letter from James K. Mbuguah from MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1962
KENYA

James Mbuguah is a young boy from Kenya who has been accepted into John Hopkins University. James is contacting Dr. King because he does not have the finances to attend the school and would like to receive assistance.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956
San Francisco, CA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Invitation from Southern Methodist University to MLK

Wednesday, August 4, 1965
Dallas, TX, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL

Bert Moore invites Dr. King to be the guest lecturer at Southern Methodist University. He says that their organization has participated in demonstration and has raised awareness in their community. He also says that next year will be an important year for their school and for Dallas as a whole, and they need a man of Dr. King's stature to come.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Benjamin Spock

Tuesday, June 16, 1964
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. King thanks Dr. Spock, famed pediatrician and social activist, for his recent contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Walter Davis, Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 11, 1966
CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA

Walter Davis, Jr. encloses a donation to SCLC sent all the way from the Congo. Mr. Davis expresses, "Of particular interest to us is the way in which you and your organization are able to get the participation of many groups who are interested in justice and social reform."

Letter from Monica Wilson to Dora McDonald

Friday, March 11, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Monica Wilson, from the School of African studies at the University of Cape Town, writes Dora McDonald expressing joy and excitement that Dr. King accepted the invitation to deliver the Davie Memorial Lecture. Wilson states that while King's accommodations are taken care of, the school cannot possibly pay for his aide.

Letter from MLK to Mr. J.G. Anoma

Tuesday, January 11, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King thanks Mr. Anoma for his monetary contribution to the SCLC. In addition, he praises Mr. Anoma for his poem entitled "Black Chicago". The poem addresses the current struggle faced by many "dark-skinned Americans" and reaffirms the aim of the SCLC-Chicago campaign.