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Telegram from Mary Gregory to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, Mary Gregory, President of the Frederick Douglass Association, informed Dr. King of their rededicated efforts to the movement, during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Nona Collins to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM

Nona Collins, Legislative Chairman of the Germantown Branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dr. King in support of his stance on civil rights and the Vietnam War.

Letter from Robert W. Fischer to MLK

Monday, January 27, 1964
Washington, D.C., ITALY

Robert Fischer is a collector of autographed TIME magazine covers that feature famous personalities. He requests the cover with Dr. King's portrait, so that he may add it to his growing collection.

Letter from Edmond G. Jeffries to MLK

Sunday, January 27, 1963
Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL)

Edmond G. Jeffries writes Dr. King after hearing him speak at the Chicago Sunday Evening Club. Jeffries states, "The injustices that the white man has visited on the colored man for hundreds of years burns my soul." Jeffries expresses that he only wants to be a Christian.

Note on MLK Recorded Statement

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Virgina Kassel sends a transcript of a recorded statement by Dr. King. Ms. Kassel provides Dora McDonald of the details related to statement and apologies for any errors on the transcript document.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Premier Kosygin and President Johnson

Sunday, June 18, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, ISRAEL, VIETNAM

Civil rights activist Harry Wachtel tells Soviet Premier Kosygin and President Lyndon Johnson that the world community depends on their solutions to crucial problems. He charges President Johnson with ending bombing in Vietnam and he charges Premier Kosygin with influencing Vietnam towards peaceful negotiations. Lastly, he asks both leaders to help eliminate war and poverty in the Middle East.

Letter from Sampson Oliver to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Sampson Oliver writes Dr. King expressing his feelings concerning the immoral notion of Vietnam War.

Flyer Announcing Benefit Performance by CSK

Thursday, February 22, 1962
New York, NY

This 1962 flyer announces a benefit musical performance, featuring Mrs. King, with the proceeds going to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

Fear

Dr. King quotes John Watson's "Behaviorism" on the two things that incite fear.

News Release: $30 Billion Omnibus Bill for Jobs, Education and Housing Presented to SCLC Convention

Friday, August 18, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI, Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI)

This press release is an overview of Congressman John Conyers, Jr.'s "Full Opportunity Act of 1967."

Letter from Fred Bennette to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967
New York, NY, South Carolina (SC)

Director Reverend Bennette requests that Dr. King increase the telephone allowance for Operation Breadbasket, stating that frequent phone calls must be made in order to keep the program active.

Letter of Support to SCLC from SAVE

Friday, July 7, 1967
New York, NY

Gladys Weekes states that she and her fellow members of the Southern Assistant Volunteer Effort (SAVE) are happy to again support the SCLC.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, July 29, 1965
Atlanta, GA

SCLC Vice President-At-Large, Ralph D. Abernathy, grants permission for the release of information to Jesse B. Blayton. Mr. Blayton was Georgia's first black Certified Public Accountant.

Letter from Alan S. Traugott to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), VIETNAM

Mr. Traugott contributes a check to SCLC indicating his grateful endorsement of Dr. King's position on civil rights and peace.

Letter from Roland de Corneille to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964
CANADA

Rev. Roland de Corneille of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from the Norway-American Association to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Ragnhild Galtung, director of the Norway-American Association, congratulates Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to speak during his upcoming visit to Oslo.

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

Idealism

Dr. King cites several statements regarding idealism.

Man: Origin, Limitations and Freedom

Dr. King quotes Bible passages that explore the value of man, the limitations of man, the relationship between soul and body, and the origin of man.

Letter from Dan C. Lortie to MLK

Monday, May 23, 1966
Chicago, IL

Professor Dan Lortie of the University of Chicago invites Dr. King to speak at the Colver-Rosenberger Lecture Series.

Letter from Samuel H. Bassow to MLK

Saturday, April 8, 1967
VIETNAM, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Montgomery, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY

The New York Times, publishes an article, "Dr. King's Error" discussing the issue of Dr. King linking his opposition to the war in Vietnam and the fight for Negro equality. Samuel H. Bassow attaches a letter to the article supporting Dr. King stances.

Letter from Joan Daves to Carlota Frahm

Monday, October 26, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

Joan Daves denies permission to Norwegian Publishers to reprint Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in connection with "Why We Can't Wait." Daves asserts that the speech will be part of Dr. King's forthcoming publication.

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

Letter from MLK and Albert A. Raby

Monday, July 10, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Albert Raby and Dr. King assert that the Weston project is "a national test case for the integrity of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act." The population of Negroes in DuPage County is extremely low and the jobs would not offer for them an equal opportunity.

Telegram from Curtis W. Harris to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 5, 1965
Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Atlanta, GA

Curtis Harris, President of the Virginia State unit of the SCLC, asks Miss McDonald to confirm some scheduled dates that have been previously discussed with Dr. King.

Letter from Sidney M. Peck to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966
Cleveland, OH

On behalf of the University Circle Teach-In Committee, Western Reserve University Professor Sydney Peck invites Dr. King to speak about the Vietnam War at a conference on US foreign policy.

Letter From MLK to George Jones

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Chicago, IL

This letter from Dr. King thanks George Jones of Joe Louis Milk Company for his "generous contribution" to the SCLC, and stresses the importance of such contributions towards the SCLC's work and mission.

Jesse Jackson and the Civil Rights Movement

Chicago, IL, North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC)

This article details Jesse Jackson's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Alversia Dunkley to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Dunkley writes Dr. King hoping to receive permission to publish her song, "Man of God," about Dr. King. She also requests contact information for the family of "Miss Viola" to receive permission to publish a poem entitled "Viola."