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Letter from Dora McDonald to Bob Alpert

Thursday, March 21, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald writes Bob Alpert of the Hotel and Club Employees Union to thank him for his previous correspondence. Miss McDonald informs Mr. Alpert that she cannot fulfill his request to receive additional copies of Dr. King's article that was published in the "Nation." However, she recommends that Alpert communicate with Carey McWilliams, editor of the "Nation," to receive those copies.

Telegram to Governor Carl Sanders

Georgia (GA)

The SCLC writes to Georgia Governor Carl Sanders regarding the murder of Andy Whatley in Americus, GA.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

Tuesday, November 26, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), New York, NY

Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Sandra Greenia to MLK

Monday, November 4, 1963
Vermont (VT)

Sandra Greenia requests that Dr. King send her some information regarding integration. She emphasizes that she gained a lot by living in various integrated U.S. Naval Bases.

Building A New Mississippi

Mississippi (MS)

This series of photos represent a plan to help rebuild Mississippi. The photos provide a blueprint and outline for strategical efforts to eradicate poverty and voting concerns.

Ethics

Dr. King quotes a scripture from the book of Psalms discussing ethics.

Letter from the Saskatchewan Teachers Federation to MLK

Thursday, November 12, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

The Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation, a Canadian organization, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The Federation extends an invitation to Dr. King to serve as the guest speaker, which will involve meetings in four to five cities. The year of 1965 is the "golden jubilee year" and their desire to have an extraordinary individual as their guest speaker.

Letter to MLK from Lee Wood

Thursday, May 11, 1967

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King explaining that the Democratic Party and Republican Party are "two shades of the same color." He suggests that because of his qualifications, Dr. King should run for President with Robert Kennedy as his Vice President.

Rauschenbusch on Sin

Dr. King references and outlines Rauschenbusch's view on sin. Rauschenbusch was a Baptist minister and a key figure in the Social Gospel movement.

Revised Grant Award Letter from Otis Roberts

Washington, D.C.

Otis Roberts lists changes to a grant awarded by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Article about Mattie Coney

Indiana (IN)

This article discusses Mattie Coney's accomplishments as the Founder of Citizens Forum.

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Virginia (VA), Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C., McComb, MS, Greenwood, MS

This pamphlet details the history, programs and purpose of The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter from the West Chester NAACP to MLK

Monday, October 26, 1964
Chester, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), SWEDEN, NORWAY

The West Chester Branch of the NAACP congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Official Religious Representatives Attending MLK Funeral

Florida (FL), Los Angeles, CA, North Carolina (NC), New York (NY)

This document contains a list of official religious representatives who will attend Dr. King's funeral.

Letter from James R. Smith to MLK

Georgia (GA)

James R. Smith, the director of the Youth Christian Education Department of Athens Community, inquires if Dr. King can support his program by giving a donation.

Letter to Hubert M. Humphrey from MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Hubert M. Humphrey to praise his "matchless, exhaustive and courageous leadership" in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964. For his effort, Dr. King tells Congressman Humphrey that he has earned the "sincere gratitude" of the international community.

Letter from Dr. E. Wolf to MLK

Thursday, April 2, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Professor Dr. E. Wolf, Chairman of the International Peace Bureau, writes Dr. King expressing the bureau's desire to have him as a guess speaker at their annual conference in Norway.

Religion

Dr. King writes about the role of religion as an ideal and as a unifying force.

Letter from Dupree Jordan to MLK about Office of Economic Opportunity

Thursday, November 17, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, dated November 17, 1966, Jordan is requesting a meeting with King to discuss the efforts of Office of Economic Opportunity (O.E.O.). Jordan is Director of Public Affairs at O.E.O. King attended O.E.O.'s meetings with the Child Development Group of Mississippi a few weeks prior to this letter.

Letter from Rev. Harvey H. Batos, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Rev. Batos Jr. expresses his support of Dr. King's political involvement despite the critisim by the New York Times.

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Illinois (IL), Michigan (MI)

Robert Green requests for Dr. King to write an introduction to the book, "Education and the Urban Poor."

President Kennedy's Record

Friday, February 9, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In this February 1962 column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King acknowledges President Kennedy's appointment of Negroes and executive order ending employment discrimination. But he calls the President “cautious and defensive” in providing strong leadership in civil rights and criticizes him for not ordering an end to discrimination in federally-assisted housing.

Letter from Geraldine Fothergill to MLK

Tuesday, February 5, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Hartford, CT

Geraldine Fothergill, a mother of seven of Hartford, Connecticut, offers Dr. King an idea about educating African American youths. She suggests that African American families develop a boarding program to house African American students that are accepted at traditionally white colleges distant from home. She also suggests that Dr. King, as a minister, can convince other ministers to support this program through the churches.

The Secular in Relation to the Holy

Dr. King quotes theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology." Dr. King's doctoral degree is in systematic theology from Boston University and his dissertation is on Paul Tillich. According to Tillich, secular and holy correlate and cannot act separately. Tillich states, "The holy embraces itself and the secular."

Letter from MLK to Senator Howard Cannon

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Democratic Senator Howard Cannon of Nevada for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Arthur Flemming

Monday, January 30, 1967
Oregon (OR)

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for Mr. Flemming's contribution to the SCLC. He states that because of the contributors continuing support, the initiatives of the SCLC can persist forward.

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card

Vermont (VT)

Frank and Ann Smallwood enclose their annual membership fees for the SCLC. The Smallwoods express that they know Dr. King will experience financial difficulties because of his stand on the Vietnam War and they wish they could contribute more.

Letter from Martha D. Kennedy to Ralph Abernathy

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Vermont (VT)

Mrs. Kennedy thanks Rev. Abernathy for the SCLC annual financial report and praises its contents. She also encloses a financial contribution and money for a copy of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

Power

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.