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MLK Address to District 65 of the AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 8, 1962

Dr. King addresses District 65 of the AFL-CIO in Monticello, New York. He begins by expressing his appreciation to the AFL-CIO for their generous contributions to the Civil Rights Movement. He discusses the impact of the Albany Movement and segregation in the South. Dr. King makes the point that America refers to itself as a world leader, yet we are significantly behind other countries in social and welfare legislation.

Letter from Gunnar Magnus to MLK Requesting Interview

Tuesday, October 18, 1966

Mr. Magnus, a Norwegian journalists and student at Davidson College in North Carolina, requests Dr. King grant an interview for his paper, the "Morgenbladet".

At Your Service!

The Washington Office of the Council for Christian Social Action chronicles the events of the organization including various seminars and cooperation with other organizations.

Letter from James H. Bowman to Rev. Andrew J. Young

Saturday, July 2, 1966

James H. Bowman writes to Rev. Young requesting for Mr. Ralph Henry to be stationed by SCLC on the near west side of Chicago.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Monday, April 12, 1965

In this letter to Miss McDonald, Ms. Daves discusses a request for Dr. King to write a short introduction to William Bradford Huie's work "Three Lives for Mississippi". Ms. Daves stresses the importance of this opportunity as it addresses a topic "very much on Dr. King's mind," namely the starting of a "dialogue...between the two opposing forces."

Memorandum from Opal C. Jones to MLK Regarding

Friday, April 7, 1967

In this letter, Opal Jones informs Dr. King of an address change for the Neighborhood Adult Participation Project.

Jesus

Dr. King records some quotes about Jesus. He quotes a passage that describes Jesus as being the person who brought about a new trust in God. Dr. King also discusses suffering.

Letter from W.T. Durr to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Pastor Durr donates funds to help Dr. King and his efforts of nonviolence.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author of this letter asks what Dr. King is doing for his people. He or she recommends the rich Negro people in the community help the poor just as the American Jewish community helped Israel.

A First Step Toward School Integration

This article on the first steps toward school integration includes a foreword by Dr. King. The article goes into some detail about the events regarding the integration of schools in Nashville, Tennessee.

Letter from Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967

The American Ambassador in Anman, Jordan encourages Dr. King to not reconsider his upcoming pilgrimage to the Middle East. Despite the turbulent political situation in the region, cancellation of the well-publicized trip would generate "distinct disadvantages" and much disappointment.

Letter from Durand R. Kinloch to MLK

Friday, August 4, 1967

Supporter Durand Kinloch describes himself as "an average white graduate student" with two children who wants to continue to support Dr. King's fight for civil rights. He stresses that love and nonviolence are needed more than ever as he witnesses a resurgence of hate in 1967.

Letter from Myles Horton to Friends of Highlander

Friday, December 8, 1967

Myles Horton, the co-founder of the Highlander Research and Education Center, explains that he has been working on a program for the Appalachian area. He also mentions that the Center sponsors voter registration, political education programs and a series of workshops to help Negro candidates run for local and state offices.

Letter from Mr. Ossie Davis to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Mr. Ossie Davis suggests to Dr. King that a tribute be prepared to honor the life of Dr. W. E. B. DuBois. Mr. Davis then asks Dr. King for his assistance in gaining sponsorship from "distinguished men and women."

MLK's Examination Book for Bible Course

Dr. King writes this essay about the problems Habakkuk presents to Jehovah. He argues that God no longer judges humanity as a collective entity, but as individuals within humanity.

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

Letter From Lillian Gilhertsen to MLK

Wednesday, June 26, 1963

Lillian Gilbertson sends Dr. King some renewals after being prompted by Chauncey Eskridge. She also requests Dr. King's response to the issue.

Letter from Bob Abel to MLK

In this letter Bob Abel encloses a contribution from a friend in England to Dr. King while also commenting on Vietnam and the link to Civil Rights.

Letter from M. Emelene Wishart to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

M. Emelene Wishart is concerned that Dr. King is weakening the fight for civil rights by campaigning to end the Vietnam War. Wishart asks Dr. King if he is attempting to "embarrass the US administration or beat Carmichael in the civil disobedience game."

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.

Man

Dr. King records a quote from Jeremiah 17:9, which discusses the evilness of man.

MLK Address to District 65, AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 18, 1965

This is the text of an address Dr. King gave to District 65, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. Dr. King references his stay in Birmingham Jail and expresses his optimism that the nonviolent movement will be successful.

The Importance of Voting

Thursday, September 6, 1962

This transcript documents Dr. King's recorded statement intended to raise awareness of voting and voter registration.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Casper I. Glenn

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King writes to Rev. Glenn, President of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, regarding Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech. Dr. King informs him that the Motown Record Corporation has been granted rights of this speech.

Letter from MLK to Willard T. Carter

Friday, December 27, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Willard Carter for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. King states that because of friends like them he can help end racial discrimination and segregation in the South.

Telegram to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

The sender of this telegram is requesting to know if Dr. King intends to travel to Sweden.

Letter from Joseph Berke to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Joseph Berke replies to Dr. King's response to an invitation to attend the Dialectics of Liberation and shares his content with one of Dr. King's speeches on the war in Vietnam.

Social Ethics in Psalms

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in Psalms 72.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Exodus in reference to "the idea of a primitive anthropomorphic God."