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Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Mathias of Maryland thanks Dr. King for his recent letter urging him to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. Although Mathias' vote against the seating was defeated, he states that the mere challenge to it "has drawn once again the attention of the American public to this unfortunate situation."

Letter to MLK from the Lutheran Standard Regarding Publishing

New York, NY, Minnesota (MN)

In this letter, George H. Muedeking, the editor of The Lutheran Standard, inquires if his publication can publish an advertisement of Dr. King's that was in The New York Times.

Paul Tillich

Dr. King references the theologian, Paul Tillich, by asserting, "If philosophy of religion does not consider the revelation claim of religion, it misses its object and doesn't deal with real religion."

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

New York, NY

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

Letter from Dick Hall to MLK

Chicago, IL

Dick Hall, Group Leader with the Chicago area Salvation Army, writes Dr. King to inform him of a program the daycare center conducts that caters to children in the surrounding area. Mr. Hill also requests Dr. King's autograph for a project display the children in the program are constructing.

Reason and Faith

Dr. King writes a quote from William Spurrier's Guide to the Christian Faith.

Letter from Rev. Camilo A. Boasso to MLK

Wednesday, December 30, 1964
New Jersey (NJ), ARGENTINA

In this document, a Catholic priest from Argentina writes to Dr. King and congratulates him for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The priest also inquires about obtaining permission to translate into Spanish Dr. King's recent book "Why We Cant Wait." Requests like this increased significantly as Dr. King's prominence grew.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eliot Stadler

Monday, June 22, 1964
St. Augustine, FL, Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN)

Dora McDonald communicates the traveling details to Eliot Stadler regarding his temporary staff placement in the SCLC.

Letter from Ellen Silver to MLK

Massachusetts (MA)

Mrs. Silver writes to Dr. King to inform him that his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" will be edited for the publication of the textbook "The Triple Revolution: Social Problems in Depth."

Letter from Executive Director of Catholic Interracial Council to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
Chicago, IL

The following document is a cover letter of enclosed letters John A. McDermott sent seventeen Negro state legislators "congratulating them on their fight for fair housing".

Letter from Duncan Wood to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

This letter outlines Dr. King's upcoming trip to Moscow. The purpose of the mission is to have past Nobel Peace Prize winners partake in an initiative to promote peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Charles Daly to Dr. King

Sunday, April 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Charles Daly is attaching an article from the 1966 issue of the University of Chicago Magazine that he thought would be of interest to Dr. King.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

Saturday, May 1, 1965
New York (NY), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA)

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

Letter from the Committee To Secure Justice for Morton Sobell to MLK

Tuesday, April 10, 1962
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Helen Sobell, wife of Morton Sobell and co-chair of the committee trying to free him, requests that Dr. King write a letter supporting the approval of his parole. She includes an attachment explaining the parole process and contact information for the US Board of Parole.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Nashville, TN, New York, NY

Thomas Johnson, managing editor for 'The Forum' at Fisk University, explains that a new chapter of SNCC has recently been charted at the school. Johnson also requests that Dr. King write an editorial for their next publication.

Telegram from Russell Tuten to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Russell Tuten writes Dr. King expressing his support in extending Voting Rights and complete citizenship to all Georgia residents. Tuten states, "Georgia should be commended for its progress in conforming to the laws of the land."

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.

Letter from Gunnar Magnus to MLK Requesting Interview

Tuesday, October 18, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

Mr. Magnus, a Norwegian journalists and student at Davidson College in North Carolina, requests Dr. King grant an interview for his paper, the "Morgenbladet".

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul J. Dolan

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C.

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald grants Paul J. Dolan approval to use the "I Have A Dream" speech that Dr. King delivered at the March on Washington.

Telegram from Rev. T. A. Borders to Mrs. King

Monday, May 13, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Borders conveys his prayers to Mrs. King, on behalf of the First Community Baptist Church.

Letter from Dr. King to Bert Onne

Monday, April 25, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King commends Bert Onne on the continued support and the accommodations received on his visit to Sweden. He also acknowledges how grateful he is for Onne's work for the Martin Luther King Fund.

Letter from Soma Ragir to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), New Jersey (NJ), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Soma Ragir extends her support for Dr. King's planned Poor People's March on Washington, but expresses her desire for heightened political organization in order to elect black congressional members who can ultimately "reform our social system."

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Memphis, TN, EGYPT, GREECE, Johannesburg, South Africa, KENYA, GHANA, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Jackson, MS, Birmingham, AL, CHINA, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, GERMANY, Albany, GA, Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), UNITED KINGDOM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CANADA, Los Angeles, CA, South Africa

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

An Open Letter to Congress from John H. Murphy III

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Baltimore, MD

John H. Murphy III, president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, urges Congress to pass the Anti-poverty Bill, because voting down the bill would be "cruel and inhumane."

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to S. I. Hayakawa

Tuesday, July 30, 1963
California (CA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Wyatt Tee Walker writes S. I. Hayakawa, academic and political figure of Japanese ancestry, informing him that the SCLC is not a tax-exempt organization. Walker says that because it is not tax exempt they are free to do as they please, and he directs Hayakawa on where to send future contributions.

Letter from Adie Marks to Harry Belafonte

Thursday, February 2, 1967
New York, NY, Selma, AL, Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS)

Adie Marks writes Harry Belafonte in an effort to organize an event consisting of several artists and organizations to combat issues African Americans face in America.

Letter from Vivian Dilday to MLK

Friday, October 27, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday writes Dr. King on behalf of the Committee on Benevolences of The Riverside Church in New York. Enclosed with the letter is a $1,000 check for the SCLC.


Dr. King defines worship.

SCLC Memo- The Ministers Leadership Training Program

Thursday, February 15, 1968

This memo reminds the Steering Committee and Executive Staff, of the SCLC, that "funds for the Ministers Leadership Training Program are not being used to finance currect SCLC direct-action programs."