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Letter from Marshall C. Dandy to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Marshall C. Dendy, the Executive Secretary of the Board of Christian Education, invites Dr. King to be a speaker for the organization's conference in Montreat. Dendy also suggests that Dr. King reconsider his stance on America's involvement in Vietnam, even though he also detests war.

Telegram from Randolph Blackwell to Mr. M. H. Thomas

Friday, August 6, 1965

Randolph T. Blackwell sends a telegram to M. H. Thomas to permit the SCLC to honor requests for telephone installations made by Carole Hoover.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Great Neck Declaration of Rededication

The citizens of Great Neck, New York rededicate themselves to the "struggle for equality and justice."

Letter from Clara Sturgas Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1961

Clara Sturgas Johnson sends Dr. King a Christmas card with an enclosed article about the integration marches in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Huub Coppens to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 2, 1964

Huub Coppens, Secretary of "The Tribune" in the Netherlands, writes Dora McDonald in hopes of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit their homeland in the near future.

Note to Dr. King from JOAN DAVES, New York, NY, dated September 23, 1973

Sunday, September 22, 1963

This note is to request Dr. King's signature on a contract with Oncken for german language edition of Stride Toward Freedom.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Kjelle Eide

Monday, January 29, 1968

In this letter Dr. King is expressing regret to Kjell Eide for the continued difficulty in organizing the peace mission. He currently aims to focus on the organizational plans for domestic issues, but would still consider a proposed alternative.

Letter to Ralph D. Abernathy from Ralph E. Gulliver

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

The James H. Farrell Lodge contributes to the SCLC for the cause of Freedom-Now.

SCLC Board Meeting Minutes

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

These minutes from the board meeting of the SCLC detail future directions and past victories, as well as current issues.

Monarchianism

Dr. King defines the doctrine monarchianism as "a doctrine stressing the unity of the Godhead as against the ultimately prevailing tendency to affirm personal distinctions within the Godhead."

Letter from Rev. S. A. Owen to MLK

Friday, November 13, 1964

In this letter, Reverend S. A. Owen of the Tennessee Baptist M. & E. Convention congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Letter from Anderson Davis to MLK

Thursday, October 3, 1963

Mr. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at West Virginia's Emancipation Proclamation centennial celebration. Mr. Davis informs Dr. King that the event is an opportunity to collect contributions for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Captain Leonard Larsen to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966

Captain Leonard Larsen writes Dr. King and attaches a copy of President John F. Kennedy's "Final Plea" regarding his sentiments about the Vietnam War. Larsen hopes to enhance and promote progress towards Dr. King's anti-war campaign.

SCLC Newsletter: January-February 1966

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This early 1966 SCLC Newsletter reports the organization's recent activity. Main columns focus on Hosea Williams' voter registration work in Birmingham, Alabama and efforts towards slum eradication in Chicago and Atlanta. The document also includes photographic content of Dr. King's public speaking endeavors and evidence of the slum crisis. Consistent school inequities and segregation are the last topics discussed.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Cover Letter Draft for MLK's 1967 Pilgrimage to the Holy Land

Sandy F. Ray drafts a cover letter to be enclosed with the packets for Dr. King's 1967 Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter from Jack Egle to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966

Jack Engle, European Director of the Council on Student Travel, thanks Dr. King for intervening during the "Nuit des Droits Civiques" in Paris. He also informs Dr. King that the ad hoc committee formed for the event will be disbanded at an upcoming meeting.

Letter from John R. Brescia to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968

John R. Brescia requests to be sent campaign materials and a schedule of Dr. King's speaking engagements.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.

Letter from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Dr. King writes Adam Clayton Powell to seek advice on how to handle Powell's return from self-imposed exile in Bimini. Powell sought to publicize the event with a public announcement by Dr. King. However, Dr. King and Powell's lawyers suggest that they arrange a quiet, staged arrest with local officials to prevent public pressure from forcing a more lengthy arrest over the criminal contempt charges Powell faced for vacating his seat in Congress. Dr. King suggests more publicity could follow once Powell's lawyers free him on bond and begin the appeals process.

Telegram from F. D. Jones to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964

Reverend F. D. Jones congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from Mathew Ahmann to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Mathew Ahmann, on behalf of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, congratulates the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for a decade of leadership.

Telegram from Delmer Brown to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965

Due to recent student activities at the University of California, Berkeley, Mr. Brown requests Dr. King's involvement in a lecture series devoted to discussing issues concerning civil disobedience.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Albert A. Goldman

Tuesday, July 13, 1965

In this letter, Dr. King informs Rabbi Albert A. Goldman that he will not be able to be a speaker at the Community Thanksgiving Services at The Isaac M. Wise Temple this year.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Monday, May 18, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the German publishers and their inquiry about a special introduction for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait." Joan Daves also asked for Dr. King's opinion about whether the press conference should be in Berlin or elsewhere.

Letter from Noel N. Marder to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Noel N. Marder, manager of the Negro Heritage Library, encloses a silver certificate from a coin shop to attempt to amuse Dr. King. Mr. Marder also hopes to connect with Dr. King to discuss his thoughts regarding the new plans that are in a stage of creation.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. B. Wilson

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Dr. King conveys gratitude to Rev. C. B. Wilson of Southern Baptist Church for a contribution to SCLC. King explains the increasing expenses of the Civil Rights Movement at a time when liberals are redirecting their attention to the peace issue.