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"BULGARIA"

Predestination

Dr. King defines predestination.

JFK's Executive Order In Housing

Thursday, December 13, 1962

This document is a draft of an article, written by Dr. King, to be placed in the Amsterdam Newspaper. Dr. King breaks down the housing order signed into law by President Kennedy. He makes clear that housing discrimination is a large hurdle to ending segregation.

Telegram from Mrs. Willie Bass to MLK

Thursday, September 23, 1954
New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

Mrs. Willie M. Bass sent this telegram expressing her hope for Dr. King's speedy recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. D. Bollinger

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
Nashville, TN, Nebraska (NE)

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Bollinger an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Importance of the Public Accommodations Section of the Civil Rights Bill

Atlanta, GA

This document features a story of a white civil rights worker who was fined and sentence to jail because she sought to eat with her Negro friends in a restaurant in Atlanta.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Ms. Saum applauds the positive attitude and accomplishments of organizations like the National Urban League, which she contrasts with the marches and riots that she feels hinder goodwill and cooperation.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. Homer A. Jack

Monday, August 30, 1965
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Ralph Abernathy follows up with Dr. Jack about a conversation they had regarding funds for the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. Abernathy encloses a check from the SCLC for the fund, which will provide the family of the slain civil rights protestor with a total of $70 per month. Abernathy also confirms that the fund will also provide a scholarship to Jackson's sister.

The Answer to a Perplexing Question

ISRAEL

"Why Could Not We Cast Him Out?" is a chapter in Dr. King's book "Strength to Love." In this chapter, Dr. King discusses the methods in which man attempts to deal with evil in the world. Two methodologies are distinguished. The first concerns man's independent attempt to remove evil and the second stems from man's ideology of making God solely responsible for eliminating evil. Dr. King concludes that neither method is successful and that man has to find a medium between the two.

Telegram from Clark Macgregor to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963
Mississippi (MS)

Clark Macgregor sends a telegram to Dr. King informing him of his vote against the dismissal of the Mississippi Challenge.

Letter from Robert Beverly to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
New York, NY

Robert Beverly of the City Employees Union Local 237 writes to Dr. Abernathy informing him of the enclosed May edition of the union's newspaper.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The SCLC issues a notice for more teachers to assist with their Citizenship Education Program. The training held at the Dorchester Center in McIntosh, Georgia, teaches potential instructors on how to educate community individuals about utilizing their basic first-class citizenship rights.

Letter from MLK to Tore Lundby

Monday, May 24, 1965
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King informs Mr. Lundby, Editor, he is unable to contribute an article to BLAESUVOLDEINS EFTERRETNINGSTIDENDE.

Schleiermacher (Religion & Ethics)

Dr. King quotes and writes about Friedrich Schleiermacher’s view in “Speeches on Religion” that criticizing a man’s actions is not criticizing his religion because he does not act from his religion. The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

He Was a Moment in the Conscience of Man

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

This article discusses the importance of preserving Dr. King's teachings and legacy.

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS)

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Letter from P. M. Smith to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
NETHERLANDS, London, England, UNITED KINGDOM, Atlanta, GA

P. M. Smith writes Dora McDonald thanking her on Dr. Ruden's behalf for a letter regarding Dr. King's visit to Amsterdam. Miss Smith references a previous correspondence from Dr. Ruden's informing Miss McDonald of the schedule for Dr. King's visit.

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1967
Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, New York (NY), Pittsburgh, PA

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Letter from Rose Auguste to MLK

CANADA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Rose Auguste asks Dr. King for a list of publishers that are open to Negro work. She is looking for a publisher for her manuscript, which has a "spiritual and supernatural theme."

Letter from MLK to Ohio Senator Frank J. Lausche

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senator Frank J. Lausche (D-OH) for his support in passing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Senator Lausche also served as Governor of Ohio.

Sentinel: "King's Book Refutes Black Power"

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Los Angeles, CA

This document is a newspaper clipping from the Los Angeles Sentinel,l giving a review of Dr. King's book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community. Headlined under the title, "King's Book Refutes Black Power", the book review places special emphasis on Dr. King's objection of black power as a slogan. In his book, Dr. King informed his readers that the paths of black and white individuals intersected towards equality and black power totally killed that process.

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Monday, June 19, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

Why Pay for Segregation?

Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Louisiana (LA), Arkansas (AR)

In this appeal to the public, the author personifies segregation and urges Negroes to stop spending money at any store that practices segregation until segregation is dead and buried.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson about Howard Address

Monday, June 7, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson expressing appreciation and admiration for his speech at the Howard University Commencement.

Letter from Gary L. Garber to MLK from Grace College

Monday, March 25, 1968
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Gary L. Gerber writes Dr. King concerning Grace College's participation in Choice '68, which is a National Presidential Primary sponsored by Time Magazine.

Toward Responsible Freedom

Chicago, IL

This manuscript describes the state of the country democracy and the challenges resulting from rapid urbanization, social dislocation and complexities of technological existence. Community organization is the solution provided to establish a sense of self-reliance and local democracy.

Letter from Oscar Seitz to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mr. Seitz expresses his appreciation for the efforts of Dr. King and the SCLC by enclosing a check to the organization.

Letter from James L. Hicklin, III to MLK

Thursday, February 14, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY

James Lewis Hicklin, III of The Freedom For All Foundation, inquires if Dr. King will serve on the organization's National Board of Governors.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, SWEDEN, INDIA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.