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"BULGARIA"

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Horace Bushnell"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Charles R. Bell Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, November 23, 1966
California (CA)

Mr. Bell inquires about a prisoner who was beaten to death in his home state of Alabama.

Statement for Immediate Release from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, May 29, 1967
New York, NY

Harper & Row Publishers issued this press release to announce the arrival of Dr. King's final publication. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was his first written narrative, since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The release also noted that the book would address Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. The tentative date of publishing, according to the document, was June 19, 1967.

Letter from US Attorney Charles L. Goodson to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

U.S. Attorney Charles L. Goodson informs Dr. King that the Justice Department for the Northern District of Georgia intends to work closely with King by offering facilities and assistance.

Telegram from MLK to Mr. Sylveter A. Okereke

Friday, August 6, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King regrettably informs Mr. Okereke that he will be unable to accept his invitation for an event held on August 18, 1965.

Vision of a World Made New

Thursday, September 9, 1954
ISRAEL, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE, NETHERLANDS

This is a draft of "The Vision of a World Made New," a speech that Dr. King delivered during the 1954 Women's Auxiliary Convention. President Nannie H. Burroughs invited Dr. King to address the group's annual meeting where he condemned imperialism, colonialism, and segregation.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."

Arnobius

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

Dr. King gives information on fourth century teacher, Arnobius and his conversion to Christianity.

Tritheism

Dr. King notes the definition of tritheism.

Letter from Reverend A. S. Markham to MLK

Friday, November 27, 1964
CANADA

Rev. Markham requests a response from Dr. King to an earlier letter. In the previous letter, Markham informed Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Shalom Synagogue would like to present an award to Dr. King.

Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbert Spencer's views on philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Marion Arnold to MLK

Wednesday, July 19, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Marion Arnold, chairman of the Ecumenical Mission Committee of Broadway United Church of Christ, expresses thanks for the copy of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

MLK Statement about the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964
Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. Kind addresses the press' claim that civil rights leaders are involved in the outbreak of riots in New York. He says that violence creates more social problems than it solves. He says that government officials need to take responsibility and help all American citizens gain justice and equality.

Letter from Beatrice Rossell to MLK

Saturday, July 4, 1964
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA

Beatrice Rossell wrote this letter to Dr. King on Independence Day in 1964, commending him on the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and enclosing a donation. She ends her note, saying "God bless you, your fine family, and the future of your great work."

Letter from MLK to Stewart Udall

Thursday, February 22, 1962
Washington, D.C.

On behalf of the SCLC and affiliated organizations, Dr. King requests permission from Stewart Udall, United States Secretary of the Interior, to use the Lincoln Memorial for a Service of Dedication to celebrate the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Ross Hamilton Sends MLK Support

Thursday, November 28, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Ross Hamilton, 11-years-old, writes Dr. King with support and encloses money from one of his Christmas gifts.

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

Indiana (IN)

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

Cosomological Argument for God

Dr. King references the cosmological argument for God.

Get Well Letter from Mr. David George Ball to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958
Connecticut (CT), Montgomery, AL

Mr. David George Ball, Chairman of the University Lecture Committee for the Yale University Christian Association, forwarded to Dr. King this get well letter.

Letter from Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1962
Montgomery, AL

Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. asks Dr. King and the Ebenezer Baptist Church for financial assistance to build his church.

Dr. King Announces Appointment of Director of New SCLC Project to Train Urban Negro Leaders

Wednesday, January 10, 1968
GEORGIA, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO), New Jersey (NJ), Birmingham, AL, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

In a press release, Dr. King announces Rev. T.Y. Rogers as the Director of the Negro ministerial training, a project created by the SCLC. The purpose of this program is to provide training seminars for ministers, which will ultimately assist congregational members with employment, economic development, voter registration, and education.

Telegram from HEW-OEO to MLK

Washington, D.C.

Jule M. Sugarman and Dr. Mary E. Switzer invite Dr. King to join a two-day meeting with the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare and the Office of Economic Opportunity, to discuss day care legislation.

Letter from G. Cacciatore to Mr. Ivan Cameron

New York (NY)

In this letter, the Chief of Foreign Operation from the United States Department of State, responds to Ivan C. Cameron recent letter rearding voting in foreign political elections by United States citizens.

Letter from Sidney Eisenberger to MLK

Wednesday, December 20, 1961
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Sidney Eisenberger sends a donation and words of encouragement to Dr. King. He praises Dr. King's work, particularly the focus on political involvement. He humorously writes that he hopes that he will one day be so unconscious of color that he will "feel free to regard a negro auto driver with the same venomous hatred I give to white drivers."

Letter to Dr. Ralph Abernathy from Frank Binswanger

Wednesday, April 24, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Frank G. Binswanger of the Philadelphia Civic Center, assures a recommitment to the cause for which Dr. King served and extends condolences to Dr. Abernathy regarding the loss of Dr. King.

Letter from Troy J. Horton to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

Troy J. Horton, a teacher at Wilson High School, inquires if Dr. King is interested in speaking to the student body of the school on topics such as racism, prejudice and segregation.

Telegram from Joseph Lowery to Wyatt Walker

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL

Reverend Joseph E. Lowery writes to Reverend Wyatt Walker acknowledging his support of Walker's "sacrifice in behalf of freedom and justice for all."

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Job regarding God's concern for man.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

Thursday, June 18, 1964
New York (NY)

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."

Letter from Nancy Childs to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Detroit, MI

Nancy Childs, a junior in high school, writes Dr. King to convey support in the fight for equality and civil rights in America. Childs is a student at an integrated high school in Detroit, Michigan and expresses her delight that Dr. King has the ability to stand up for his beliefs. This letter was drafted following the bloody assault against demonstrators during the first attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery on March 7, 1965.