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"BULGARIA"

Telegram from Stanley Levison to Coretta Scott King

Friday, January 17, 1969

Stanley Levison warns Mrs. King about interceding between governments.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

Dynamic Form Applied to God

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's Systematic Theology on the difference in applying the dynamic form to God versus applying it to man.

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

Love

Dr. King writes on the Apostle Paul’s concept of love.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ruby Hurley

Thursday, January 3, 1963

At Dr. King's request, Ms. McDonald sends Ruby Hurley a check from Delores Robinson for a lifetime membership in the NAACP.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Josephine Baker offers support and encouragement to Dr. King in the civil rights campaign and asserts "without unity there cannot be a solid victory."

Letter from Carey Preston to Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Mrs. Carey B. Preston confirms the details of Dr. King's trip to Philadelphia to speak at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Convention.

The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.

Letter from Bishop K. Chengalvaroya Pillai to MLK

Saturday, August 27, 1966

Bishop K. Chengalvaroya Pillai writes Dr. King asking if he can read his recently published book entitled "Light Through an Eastern Window" and write a book review. His book "acquaints the people of the Western World with the thought and ways of life of the Eastern world in relation to the Bible."

Letter from M. Steven Lubet to MLK

Friday, March 3, 1967

M. Steven Lubet is requesting the presence of Mr. and Mrs. King at the Vietnam teach-in. The teach-in is being sponsored by the Northwestern chapter of Students for a Democratic Society and its purpose is to increase people's understanding of the events occuring in Vietnam.

Letter from Ernest M. Bettenson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Ernest M. Bettenson, the Registrar at the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, writes Miss McDonald to solidify arrangements for Dr. King's visit to the University. The sender informs Miss McDonald that tradition mandates meal arrangements for the recipient of an honorary degree and outlines several options to assist Dr. King in accommodating this practice.

Darien Seeking Negro Teachers

Thursday, November 26, 1964

This article discusses the teacher exchange program between New York City Public Schools and Darien, Connecticut. The program calls for African American teachers to teach students in the predominately white town. The superintendent states the purpose of the project is to show the students that African Americans, if given the same opportunity, are just as intelligent as their white counterparts.

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Lawrence Greene

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

In this letter, Mrs. Lawrence Greene offers encouragement to Mrs. King. As such she writes, "You have today made yourself a woman among women. In your time of grief you thought not of yourself but of us that cry in the night."

Letter from Blanche Shropshire to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967

Mrs. Shropshire expresses her gratitutde to Dr. King for his inspiring words at an address delivered in Buffalo, New York.

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. J Parry Jones for an SCLC Contribution

Friday, December 8, 1967

This letter from Dr. King responded to a donation to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference from Mr. and Mrs. J. Parry Jones of Newton, Pennsylvania. Dr. King expressed deep appreciation on behalf of the multitudes who would benefit from the support.

Montanism

Dr. King records information about the second century Christian movement known as Montanism.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, October 29, 1965

Dr. Mays writes to Dr. King regarding the new statement of purpose for Morehouse College.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, September 20, 1963

W. David Angus, Secretary of the Canadian Club of Montreal, extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at an upcoming luncheon. He concludes by offering to cover any expenses that Dr. King may accumulate if he were to accept the invitation.

SCLC News Release

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a new release stating Dr. King's demands that the Department of Justice act immediately to halt brutal treatment and intimidation of Negro school children and parents in the State of Mississippi. Dr. King cites several violent and near violent incidents that have occurred in Mississippi during the month of October.

Thank You Letter from MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

MLK wrote this thank you note to a supporter, Mrs. C.C. White, at a time when some former supporters were worried about a lack of racial unity or SCLC's position against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Areatha G. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Areatha G. Bailey, President of the Highland Park Branch of the NAACP, invites Dr. King to speak at their Freedom Fund Dinner.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites the Old Testament biblical book of Exodus regarding social ethics.

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service

Sunday, September 11, 1966

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service Program outlines the events for September 11, 1966. Dr. King is the guest speaker to commemorate "the retirement of Rev. D. C. Rice from the pastorship of The Union Baptist Church."

Letter from Mae Martin to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967

Mae Martin of Little Rock, Arkansas, writes to Dr. King in response to one of his public statements. She speaks about race relations in her city and points out that there is good and bad within both the white and black communities.

Telegram from Elizabeth J. Miller to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

Elizabeth Miller, the Executive Director of the Christian Social Concern division of the American Baptist Convention, extends support to Dr. King while he is in the Jefferson County Jail in 1967. She expresses gratitude for Dr. King's leadership and commends him for his non-violent action.

The Free Southern Theater

The Free Southern Theater was co-founded by members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. They toured throughout the South, performing free of charge in Negro communities that had no theater, as a cultural and education extension of the Civil Rights Movement.