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"BULGARIA"

Letter from Isaac Franck to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963
Washington, D.C., Richmond, VA

Issac Franck extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at Adas Israel. Adas Israel is the largest Conservative Congregation in the Greater Washington area.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966
New York, NY

Mr. Wilkins, Chairman of the Call Committee, writes to assure Dr. King's participation in an upcoming conference. Worldwide interest is developing and Dr. King's presence and leadership is very important.

Letter from Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), South Carolina (SC), Arkansas (AR), North Carolina (NC), Connecticut (CT), Michigan (MI), Missouri (MO), Massachusetts (MA), Indiana (IN), Illinois (IL), Nebraska (NE), New York (NY), Hawaii (HI), Pennsylvania (PA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Hugh Scott, U. S. Senator from Pennsylvania, assures Dr. King that he intends to support voting rights legislation and especially the proposal to eliminate the poll taxes instituted as a form of discrimination.

Affidavit of Captain George Wall

Wednesday, April 10, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

George Wall, Captain of the Police Department for the City of Birmingham, submits an affidavit. The document states that a group of thirty-two Negroes led by Charles Billups and Fred Shuttlesworth were arrested for marching without a permit.

Letter from Zelma Dodd to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM

Zelma Dodd sends Dr. King her best wishes along with two poems entitled, "The Soul of a Black Man," and "A Negro Soldier."

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale to MLK While in Jaill

Monday, October 24, 1960
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Harry Van Asrdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council, informs Dr. King that the organization has voted to demand the release of Dr. King and others from Fulton County Jail. He states that the arrest violates "basic constitutional rights" and that the Council fully supports the fight to end discrimination and segregation in the United States.

Letter from George E. Riddick to MLK

Wednesday, July 8, 1964
Chicago, IL

Mr. Riddick writes to Dr. King and thanks him for speaking at Soldier Field. He expresses the support of the Illinois community for Dr. King's ministry on behalf of Civil Rights.

Letter from Melvin W. Trent to Dr. King

Virginia (VA)

An individual desiring to remain anonymous, writes Dr. King expressing his concern with employment discrimination and his belief that Dr. King can change things.

Letter From Jim Letherer Regarding Proposed March

Thursday, November 23, 1967

In this letter Letherer suggests a March on Christmas Eve or Easter Sunday while expressing his continued support and participation in S.N.C.C.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Arthur Flemming

Monday, January 30, 1967
Oregon (OR)

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for Mr. Flemming's contribution to the SCLC. He states that because of the contributors continuing support, the initiatives of the SCLC can persist forward.

Note Card from H. Plant

H. Plant expresses his approval for the Civil Rights Movement, but also shares his frustration with the implication that all whites carry the blame for the current situation.

Proposals

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King writes a proposal to the Democratic and Republican national conventions regarding the Constitutional rights and human dignity of Negroes. King warns the parties that "platforms and promises are no longer sufficient to meet the just and insistent demands of the Negro people for immediate free and unconditional citizenship." King earnestly requests the parties to ensure: Negro people in the South secure the right to vote, an end to terror against Negroes, and enforcement of the 1954 Supreme Court decision against school segregation.

Letter from Robert Pritchard to The Benjamin Franklin Institute

Friday, April 7, 1967
MEXICO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

As a result of being investigated by Mr. Aguiliar, a staff member of the Benjamin Franklin Institute, Robert Pritchard, writes the director of the institute expressing his grievances. A carbon copy of this letter was sent to the National Headquaters, SCLC and NAACP.

Statement From MLK In Response To Article Alleging Communist Ties

Thursday, July 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This press release issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference features a Statement by Dr. King responding to allegations that he and the SCLC has communist ties. Dr. King argues that the SCLC is grounded in the Christian non-violent movement with the intent of reform, wherease communism leads to violent revolution.

The Power of Silence

Dr. King provides an account of several passages from the Bible, outlining his notes and interpretation.

Letter from Andrew Young to James Bevel and Dave Delliger

Tuesday, March 14, 1967
New York, NY, Oregon (OR)

Andrew Young writes Revered James Bevel and Mr. Dave Dellinger confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at a rally in New York, New York on April 15th. Young further addresses logistical issues that may arise in the execution of the event, as well as how to best increase participation.

Letter from Robert L. Martin to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX, Atlanta, GA

Dr. Robert L. Martin, Associate Professor of History at Texas Christian University, invites Dr. King to come speak to the university.

Letter from Silvio O. Conte to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Representative Silvio Conte informs Dr. King that he received Dr. King's letter pertaining to the petition for home-rule of Washington D.C. Conte asserts that he is a strong advocate for home-rule of the district.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy from Rev. Parker

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Rev. Ralph Abernathy, President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, received this correspondence following the assassination of Dr. King. In this letter, Rev. Richard Parker of the St. Cross Episcopal Church in California, highlighted his interest in a television interview of Mrs. King, shown on the day of Dr. King's funeral.

SNCC - SCLC Alabama Staff Meeting

Friday, January 28, 1966
Alabama (AL)

Randolph Blackwell updates Andrew Young of the recent SCLC and SNCC joint meeting intended to resolve any conflicts between the two organizations and their initiatives within the state of Alabama. The mounting tension between the two civil rights organizations is attributed to the rise of Black Panther Party chapters throughout the South, a phenomenon from which SCLC intends to distance itself.

Letter from Harris McDowell, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Representative Harris McDowell, Jr. writes Dr. King stating that he voted against seating the Mississippi delegation. McDowell states, "I appreciate having your views regarding this important problem."

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, encloses a memorandum that proposes that the Atlanta Student Movement performs the following actions: "educate and involve the community, convince the Atlanta Board of Education that 'everyone cares,' and force action from the Board."

Washington D. C. Star: Negro Lawyer Pushing Town Incorporation Plan

Thursday, October 5, 1967

Congressman John Conyers shares an article with civil rights attorney, Orzell Billingsley. The article highlights Attorney Billingsley's efforts to join 20 predominately black municipalities, so that more African Americans can have a voice within politics and economic development.

MLK and New York Protest Meeting Speakers

Friday, June 2, 1961
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Brooklyn, NY

The SCLC releases a statement to the media regarding Dr. King and other Southern leaders trip to New York to address a series of mass protest meetings. This document outlines a schedule of meetings and also announces that Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. and Actor Harry Belafonte will join the protest.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL)

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

SCLC Voter Registration Program

Sunday, February 1, 1959
Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL

The SCLC issues a plan of action to inspire communities in the South to sponsor a year-round voter registration program. The document also includes facts regarding the organization's history and purpose, as well as detailed instructions for conducting an effective voter-registration campaign.

Soap, Brush Help

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

Letter from MLK to Adolf Kriess

Friday, December 7, 1962
California (CA)

Dr. King sends a note of thanks to Mr. Kriess for a poem he sent.

MLK Draft Notes: Worship

Dr. King preached this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist church on August 7, 1955. In this handwritten outline, Dr. King focuses on the practice of worship, claiming that it is an intrinsic part of human culture. After outlining a negative definition of worship, he approaches it from a "positive angle," describing a multitude of experiences he deems worshipful. Ultimately, he asserts that worship is useful on both a private and public level as it "helps us to transcend the hurly-burly of everyday life."

Guide for Churchmen in Interracial Conflict Situations

Wednesday, March 29, 1967
New Orleans, LA

In this document, the Southern Field Service encourages church leaders to aid in African American social justice mobilization.