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Letter from Senora Springfied to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Mrs. Senora Springfied requests that Dr. King send Leon Hall, an SCLC employee, back to Grenada, Mississippi. She praises Hall and mentions that the town needs leaders like him.

An Edition of the SCLC Newsletter

This April/May 1964 SCLC newsletter highlights the recent accomplishments of the SCLC and its members. Some of the topics discussed are the 50-mile march from Selma to Montgomery, Ben Hooks' recent judicial appointment, and Dr. King being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Sunday, March 12, 1967

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam outlines a list of requests for its members, including weekly communications and completed bus questionnaires.

Negro Leaders' Mistakes Hurting Civil Rights

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

In this article, David Lawrence explains his dissatisfaction with "Negro leaders" for supporting the actions of Adam Clayton Powell, who in Lawrence's mind, has abused his office and trust.

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.

Declaration of Independence by MLK

Dr. King writes an article making reference to the Emancipation Proclamation, President Lincoln, and the historical impact they both have had on the economy and what is described to be a social revolution. It is noted that this article is intended for a December, 1962 issue of a publication.

Telegram from MLK to Robert L. Leggett

In this telegram, King urges the House of Representatives to please vote passage demonstration cities for the sake of civil peace.

People In Action: Literacy Bill Dies

Saturday, May 26, 1962

Dr. King shares his disappointment with the Senate vote that stopped the 1962 Voting Rights Bill, then known as the Literacy Bill. The bill would have eliminated the literacy tests that Dr. King believed were used to keep African-Americans of all education levels from qualifying to vote.

Immortality

"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Letter from Steve Addams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Steve Addams writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for Dr. King's work. Addams also offers his condolences for the death of Martin Luther King, Sr.

Letter from MLK to W. M. Jones

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King writes Bishop W. M. Jones of Israel of God's Church expressing his gratitude for their generous contribution to the SCLC.

March on Washington Transportation Information

This is a form sent to each organization participating in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, requiring information regarding transportation arrangements.

Letter from Mrs. Aaron Oliver to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Mrs. Aaron Edgar Oliver writes Dr. King to give thanks for his efforts to try and lead the Republican convention in its choice of a candidate.

Letter to MLK Regarding Merit Award

The author writes a letter that advocates for Dr. King to win an award of merit. In the letter, he discusses some major events that occurred throughout the Reverend's life. Some of these events include: leading the Civil Rights Movement, winning the Nobel Peace Prize, and becoming a strong political figure.

Summit Conference Program

Sunday, December 15, 1963

This program outlines the schedule and issues of concern to be addressed at the Summit Conference.

Outline of Our God is Able

Dr. King outlines his sermon, "Our God is Able." He plans to explain the good and evil in humanity and ensures his audience that through all, "Our God is Able."

Abelard on Universals and theMethod of Descartes

Dr. King references Peter Abelard, medieval French philosopher and theologian. He discerns that universals cannot be things or words. Rather, the universal is a concept. King maintains that this quandary is relevant to "Schoolmen" and particularly the dogma of the Church. He continues by also noting philosopher Rene Descartes, and that "he was at fault in overemphasizing mathematical method."

Transcript of Press Conference on Hotel Restaurant Desegregation

Dr. King states in this 1962 press conference that he sees integration of Atlanta hotels and restaurants as imminent. With the exception of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, civil rights are progressing throughout the South. The many groups working on the issue are working toward a common goal and using a variety of strategies, including direct action, litigation, legislation, and education.

Telegram from Women's Auxillary of the Chicago NAACP to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

The Women's Auxiliary of the Chicago Branch of the NAACP informs Dr. King he will be the recipient of their 1966 Humanitarian Award.

Letter from Paul R. Davis to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967

Paul R. Davis, Minister at First Congregational Church of Webster Groves, writes Dr. King regarding an interview between Dr. King and Father Daniel Lyons, S. J. about the connection between Vietnam and the need for US federal poverty program funding. Davis requests any material to "clarify critical interpretations" that may have been perceived by the interview.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nemichandra

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding the structure and function of the SCLC. He informs the inquirer that he is enclosing pamphlets and brochures in hopes that the literature will successfully address all of his questions.

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Thursday, December 20, 1956

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Wachman

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Dr. King informs Dr. Wachman, that due to his extremely busy schedule and his particular attention to the South, he will not be able to accept an invitation to speak at Lincoln University.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Constance Baker Motley

Friday, June 22, 1962

Mr. Walker informs Mrs. Motley, Associate Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, that either he or Dr. King will be in attendance at the upcoming Lawyers Conference.

God in Isaiah

Dr. King cites Isaiah 55: 8,9 on the holiness and transcendence of God and distinguishes this from an anthropomorphic view of God.

Letter from Thomas Gilliam to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967

Thomas Gilliam writes this letter with hope that Dr. King will grant him an interview about the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

List of SCLC Program Areas

This list briefly outlines the SCLC Program Areas including Voter Registration and Political Education, Citizenship Education, Operation Breadbasket, and Direct Action.

Telegram from Al Duckett to MLK

Saturday, July 9, 1966

In this telegram to Dr. King, Mr. Al Duckett professes his willingness to protest in Chicago.

Eulogy for Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Victims

This is Dr. King?s eulogy for three of the four young girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. God gives man the right to exercise good and evil, King says, but God wills that everything will happen for the good ? that out of tragedy comes redemption. Martyred in the struggle for freedom, the girls have become symbols of the crusade and of the faith that sustains it. King speaks of forgiving those who murdered the girls and the need to transform the system, the way of life, and the philosophy that led to the bombing.