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"BURMA / MYANMAR"

Draft Letter from MLK to Mrs. Smock

Dr. King apologizes for responding to Mrs. Smock's letter over a year late, but extends gratitude for the invitation to her art exhibition. Dr. King affirms that if he is in Atlanta during the time of her exhibition he and Coretta will attend.

Hints on Religious Music for Radio

This pamphlet, written by Charles Schmitz, acknowledges the impact of music on religious radio. Schmitz maintains that music helps establish the purpose of religious radio programs and that certain musical selections have the power to create Christian mood and comfort. This pamphlet gives instructions on how best to implement music.

Letter from Congressman Adam Clatyon Powell to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965

Harlem Representative Adam Clayton Powell informs Dr. King that all of the "War on Poverty" hearings will be cancelled until furtherl notice.

Letter from MLK to Artist Committee for SCLC

Friday, May 5, 1967

This letter expresses Dr. King's regards and deep appreciation to the Artist Committee for their generous contribution. He communicates gratitude on behalf of so many who benefit from the work made possible from their support. Additionally, Dr. King communicates the continued strength and effectiveness of the SCLC in promoting negro-white unity, non-violence, justice and equality.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gus Efroymson

Thursday, January 28, 1965

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Mr. Gus Efroymson for the contribution of $100.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Advice for Living

Advice for Living is a column Dr. King uses to help people with moral dilemmas. In this issue, he receives questions from an 18-year old about his mother's drinking issues, a 24-year old with relationship issues, and others.

Letter from Ann Bettiglan to MLK

Monday, August 16, 1965

Ann Bettiglan writes Dr. King informing him that her friend Daniza Thompson is in need of financial help. She gives Dr. King her friend's address and phone number so that he can assist her.

Sworn Deposition of MLK

Monday, December 10, 1956

Dr. King records an event that happened on a train between Nashville and Montgomery, during which a policeman denied him access to the general waiting room.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Letter from Secretary to Joan Regarding the Rights to "Strength to Love"

Monday, June 15, 1964

In this letter, the secretary asks Joan the status of the Japanese Edition to "Strength To Love", since Dr. King hadn't had the time to write the preface.

Telegram From Avanta Williams to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960

Avatna Williams, family and friends send their thoughts and prayers to Dr. King when they heard that he would serve a year in jail.

Letter from Saul Miller to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966

Saul Miller, Director of the Department of Publications for the AFL-CIO, writes Dr. King requesting him to write a description of the activities of the SCLC. This write-up will be featured in the November issue of the AFL-CIO magazine, which will be devoted entirely to the issue of civil rights.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Appreciation Letter to MLK

Wednesday, August 21, 1963

President John F. Kennedy writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his support during this difficult time. President Kennedy is referring to the death of his second son, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, who died two days after his birth August 7, 1963.

Telegram from Roselle Siegal to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Roselle Siegal extends her appreciation and moral support of Dr. King by means of this Western Union telegram.

Contribution Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

A Department of State Agency for International Development summer intern expresses his support for SCLC. He offers a small contribution to the Atlanta-based foundation.

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Martin J. Morand, Vice-President of the Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg, inquires about Dr. King's availability to serve as a guest speaker at a late 1964 meeting in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Montesquieu

Dr. King cites the political philosopher Montesquieu on his ideology of the weakness of laws. He further details the comparison of coexistence and consecutive social status. Dr. King concludes with the elaboration of Montesquieu's use of facts.

Transition Period

Dr. King quotes an unknown source that links the transition period to Alfred North Whitehead’s rejection of his earlier view about science and philosophy.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to Dora McDonald Regarding Board Meeting

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

In this letter, Dr.Mays informs Ms.McDonald that it is imperative that Dr. King attends the annual board meeting,"since this is his first time being with us".

Letter from MLK to Debbie Steiner

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Dr. King thanks Miss Steiner for her letter and explains how love is the way to overcome the injustices brought on by prejudice and ignorance. He writes that, though it can be difficult, she must direct her thoughts in a loving way towards those who mistreat her.

Chapter II - The Methodologies of Tillich and Wieman

This is the third chapter of Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conception of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

SCLC Administrator Job Description

Monday, August 29, 1966

This document outlines the responsibilities of the role of an Administrator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MIT/Harvard Joint Center for Urban Studies to MLK

Thursday, July 6, 1967

In this letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Director Daniel P. Moynihan asks Dr. King to assist him and his organization by advocating for an increase in funds for the 1970 Census. The purpose is to "improve the enumeration of Negroes, Puerto Ricans, and Mexican-Americans".

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. White

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mr. White for considering him to be on Per Se Advisory Board, but due to a busy schedule Dr. King declines his offer.

Support Letter from

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Donna Breiter conveys her support of Dr. King's work within the Civil Rights Movement. Due to her finances she cannot physically attend marches, but she inquirers of other ways to support the efforts.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

This draft of an article for the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC newsletter discusses recent riots in New York City and Rochester, New York. The riots are a disappointment not only because they deviate from the path of nonviolence, but also because the rioters looted many Jewish-owned businesses. The article closes by listing examples of Jews helping in the fight for racial equality in the United States.

Letter from Mrs. Lewis Cooper to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

Mrs. Cooper writes Ms. McDonald to invite Dr. King to speak at the Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago in January 1968.

Dr. King's Written Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Ibarance Mann's views on death. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for refernce to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions and bible verses.