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Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Beverly A. Asbury

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

In this letter Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rev. Beverly Asbury for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He stresses the importance of supporters' contributions in order to successfully continue the initiative toward unity, justice, and equality.

Relationship of State Units to the National Office

This document outlines the relationship between the national office of the SCLC and state level institutions, referred to as "State Units."

MLK Writes to Mrs. King from Jail

Tuesday, October 25, 1960

Dr. King writes this letter to Coretta Scott King after recently being transferred to a state prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He expresses understanding of how the present circumstances are difficult for his family, particularly given Coretta's pregnancy with their third child, Dexter Scott King. King goes on to encourage Coretta to maintain strength and says that their excessive suffering will serve the greater purpose of freedom. He asks her to come visit him and requests that she bring several books, a collection of sermons and a radio.

Evil

Dr. King defines the concept of good and evil by refrencing Philip S. Richards' "Belief of Man."

Telegram from Thomas Penna to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967

Thomas A. Penna, the president of the Interracial Council of Buffalo, lists his concerns related to a poverty bill that will be debated the next day. Penna points out that the bill will harm impoverished Negroes, who are already being denied their right to vote. Penna urges Dr. King to address these issues during his upcoming speech in Buffalo, New York.

"Where Do We Go From Here?" Asks Negro King

Thursday, February 1, 1968

In this article, Palmer Van Gundy reviews Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." He calls the book a must for all Americans, naming Dr. King not just the greatest civil rights leaders, but also a "leader for peace with freedom and justice."

Letter from Jose Luis Villar Palasi to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Jose Luis Villar Palasi informs Dr. King tha that the Chair for Cultural Sociology has invited him to present at the Universidad of Madrid.

Kierkegaard (Paradox)

Dr. King quotes Kierkegaard and comments on his view of paradox.

Servetus, Michael

Dr. King writes biographical notes about Michael Servetus, a citizen of Spain known for his study of medicine and theology. Servetus was burned at the stake because of his anti-Trinitarian views.

Letter from Shirley Bird to Miss Sander

Monday, February 19, 1962

Ms. Bird discusses Dr. King's lecture appearance at the University of Texas. Dr. King's lecture was entitled "Civil Liberties and Social Action."

Letter from the Baptist Union of Western Canada to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966

The Baptist Union of Western Canada informs Dr. King that they have released him from any obligation to participate in the convention in Winnipeg. The union is conscious of Dr. King's great responsibilities and the difficulty he faces while attempting to make appearances.

Letter from Ms. Dora Byron of Emory University to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

In this letter, Ms. Byron of Emory University's Community Educational Service requests for Dr. King to appear on a new campus public service television program entitled "Profile."

Standing By The Best in an Evil Time" E

Sunday, August 6, 1967

In this sermon, Dr. King addresses the evil in the world and suggest to his congregation that they counter this by being strong and steadfast in the Lord. Dr. King also touches on the current issues in society and how to continue the use of nonviolence as means to for peace and social justice.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Laurence Kirkpatrick

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dora McDonald sends a biographical sketch and photograph as requested to Laurence Kirkpatrick.

Christianity and Civilization

Dr. King records a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's "Civilization on Trial" and the view that "religious progress comes through the birth and death of civilization."

Letter from MLK to Gaynette Henderson

Monday, November 2, 1964

Dr. King regretfully informs Gaynette Henderson that he will be unable to visit the sorority suite of Delta Sigma Theta during his visit to Pennsylvania State University.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Memo to Members of the National Board of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Friday, January 6, 1967

This letter from Richard W. Boone invites recipients to attend a workshop for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Letter from MLK to Marguerite Priolean

Sunday, October 6, 1963

Dr. King is invited to speak at Cheyney State College in Pennsylvania by Mrs. Marquerite Priolean. However, Dr. King must deny the request due to the excessive amount of speaking engagements already placed on his calendar.

Invitation to President Johnson's Inauguration

Dr. King receives an invitation to attend and participate in the Inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson and Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey.

Essay Outline by John Mates on Helmut Richard Niebuhr

Friday, April 20, 1951

John Mates contests the influence of Helmut Richard Niebuhr written contributions to the church through his congruent philosophy with Jesus Christ's message. Mr. Mates further discusses the churches relations to the societal influences of politics and economics.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dolly Davis

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dolly Davis that Dr. King is absent from the city and they're looking forward to receiving the galleys to "the New World of Negro Americans" by Harold Isaacs.

Letter to MLK from Philip L. Estrada about Operation Breadbasket Milwaukee

Phillip Estrada, the editor of the Milwaukee Star News, request Dr. King's presence in support of the Breadbasket Operation. Estrada describes this growing organization as one that has made an impression on Milwaukee. He hopes that Dr. King will deliver words of encouragement to keep the morale up and to show his support.

Letter from Frank Jones to MLK

Tuesday, August 14, 1962

Reverend Frank Jones sends Dr. King a letter expressing his concern about the recent occurrences in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.

Letter from Nathaniel Barber to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965

Nathaniel Barber addresses Dr. King and encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC in the amount of $5.00. Barber sends his prayers to the Reverend and asks for a suitable picture to hang on the wall of his office.

International Convention of Christian Churches Session Schedule

Wednesday, September 14, 1966

This program for the International Convention of Christian Churches provides an itinerary for a one-day session taking place in Dallas, Texas. A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary, sends this final letter to coordinate all aspects and help guide participants. Dr. King is listed on the schedule as a guest speaker and intends to deliver an address entitled "Beyond Discovery Love."

Letter from Mary R. Hunt to Mrs.King Regarding Recommendation for Employment

Monday, May 27, 1963

Ms. Hunt, Director of the Extramural Department for Antioch College, sends Mrs. King the resume and photo of Dixie Lee Kisor for employment consideration.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Friday, December 3, 1965

Vice President Humphrey thanks Dr. King for participating in a recent White House Conference, "To Fulfill These Rights," which focused on jobs, jobs training and economic security.

James Meredith Article

A newspaper article describes an argument that occurred between James Meredith and a group of black deacons in the city of Canton, Miss. The argument ultimately led to Meredith stating "I can understand why so many Negroes have been lynched."