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Letter from Burton Cain to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Chicago, IL

Burton Caine informs Dr. King of the dilemma with the American Jewish liberal's continuation in the Civil Rights Movement. Caine recounts repeated instances of Negroes singling out Jews in verbal attacks. He emphasizes this irony given that Jews have been active supporters of the Civil Rights Movement. Unsure if Dr. King stands in solidarity with anti-Semitic views, Caine asks Dr. King to issue a statement to clarify his beliefs.

Value

Dr. King references Ralph Perry's "Present Philosophical Tendencies" and "The Present Conflict of Ideals" in relation to the subject of value.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

Nonviolent Leaders

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King, Hosea Williams, and Bernard Lafayette are mentioned and photographed in a newspaper article that has been defaced by external drawings. The article is also covered in adverse commentary about the three leaders.

Letter from John Lazenby to MLK

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Wisconsin (WI), Atlanta, GA, San Francisco, CA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

John Lazenby, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, encloses a donation to Dr. King. He further stresses that nonviolence is the prime method to solve problems around the world. Lazenby requests copies of Dr. King's anti-war speech delivered at New York's Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 to distribute to his friends.

SCLC Annual Financial Report

Atlanta, GA

Ralph David Abernathy, SCLC Financial Secretary and Treasurer, submitted this Annual Financial Report for the fiscal year 1963-1964. The report also includes the estimated budget for 1964-1965.

Letter from Mrs. Sigrid Sharp to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Sharp commends Dr. King for his open opposition to the Vietnam War. She further requests copies of his April 4, 1967 speech before New York's Riverside Church, in order to raise political awareness and garner support against the war effort.

Letter from Laurie Bush to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
New York (NY)

Laurie Bush writes to Dr. King requesting information about the Civil Rights Movement for his or her research paper.

Letter from Dixie to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dixie, a white man and segregationist, states in his letter to Dr. King that it has taken the Whites only a few weeks to get segregation rolling again.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Wednesday, February 15, 1967
Florida (FL), New York, NY

In this letter Joan Daves requests Dr. King's input on his chapter, "Black Power." Daves also inquires as to which magazine to send the manuscript first and suggests first sending it to "Life" magazine.

Letter from Eva Rosenfeld to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Eva Rosenfeld writes Dr. King expressing her support of his stance on the Vietnam War, regardless of critics like the NAACP. She asserts that King's mentality is wise and "that hope for all of us lies in seeing these issues as one issue, an issue of our humanity."

Letter from Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti to MLK

Friday, June 25, 1965
INDIA, Tokyo, Japan, NEPAL, Berlin, Germany, New York (NY)

The Indian organization, Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti, expresses admiration of Dr. King's heroic struggle for civil rights in the US, along with his application of Mahatma Gandhi's methods. A bronze bust of Gandhi is offered as a gift of appreciation and a request made for placement of the statue in a children's park.

Telegram from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK and Mrs. King

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dow Kirkpatrick congratulates Dr. King and apologizes for his absence at the event.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Lucile Giles

Tuesday, December 10, 1963
Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald informs Lucile Giles that Dr. King will be notified of her books upon his return to the office.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, SOUTH AFRICA, Los Angeles, CA, Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Chattanooga, TN, Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. Jones congratulate Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. They send their regrets for not being able to attend the dinner to honor Dr. King's accomplishment.

Letter from Ned Griffin to MLK

Friday, February 1, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL

Ned Griffin, a fourth grade student at Betsy Ross School, acknowledges Dr. King's great contribution to the United States. He explains that his fourth grade class would like an autographed picture of Dr. King for their bulletin at school.

The Atlanta Board of Education

Friday, September 15, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Atlanta Board of Education neglects to solve educational issues in the Negro community. There are protests and demonstrations from those who object to the disdain of action. Julian Bond purposes a course of action designed to educate, convince, and force action from the board.

Letter from MLK to Premier Lyndon Pindling

Friday, January 19, 1968
BAHAMAS, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King encourages Premier Pindling of the Bahamas to accept an invitation to address the Atlanta Press Club. Dr. King assures Premier Pindling that the invitation is a great opportunity to speak with leading journalists from all over the United States.

The Eternality of God Verses The Temporality of Man

This document is an outline of the sermon titled "The Eternality of God Versus the Temporality of Man." In the first two sections, Dr. King contrasts the time-conditioned nature of man with God, who transcends time. The final portion highlights a significant fact that God is absolute and unchangeable.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Note

New York (NY)

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Chicago Schedule

Chicago, IL

Dr. King lists the flight numbers and times associated with his travel from Atlanta to Chicago.

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Bolt Culbertson

Tuesday, January 7, 1964
South Carolina (SC), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Culbertson that Dr. King is grateful for the invitation to speak at a South Carolina fundraiser for the families of Medgar Evers and the children killed in the Birmingham church bombing, but will be unable to attend. Miss McDonald refers Culbertson to contact Roy Wilkins of the NAACP to be a possible keynote speaker.

Dr. King Sermon Outline - "Choose Life"

This handwritten document is an outline of a sermon entitled "Choose Life."

Letter from Theresa Sutherland to Coretta S. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Theresa Sutherland sends her condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

Letter from Marlyn Roach to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Marlyn Roach requests an interview in hopes of a job with SCLC, as she is disillusioned with the antipoverty programs on which she has been working. She cites the cause of the "total failure" of the program to be the difference between the Negroes' and the state and federal government's objectives.

On Being A Good Neighbor

ISRAEL

In Dr. King's sermon "On Being A Good Neighbor," he explains variety of stories that aid him in defining a good samaritan as an altruistic human being. He uses the path to Jerusalem and Jericho as a walking path where people must help others to accomplish one goal equality.

Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967
New York, NY, CHINA, Geneva, Switzerland, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, GUATEMALA, PERU, MEXICO

"Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam" is a sermon Dr. King delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967 in Atlanta. In this draft of the sermon, Dr. King references a previous speech, "Beyond Vietnam," that he delivered to the group "Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam" at Riverside Baptist Church in New York City.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Wiley Bell

Thursday, July 25, 1963
Texas (TX)

In this letter, Dr. King writes a thank you note to Mr. Bell for his support concerning "Letter from Birmingham Jail."