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The Kingdom

Dr. King references New Testament passages related to The Kingdom.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous author criticizes Dr. King's stance on the American economy and the current status of the Negro.

Invitation from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

This is a program for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's Forty-First Boule in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The event features Dr. King as a guest speaker.

God, Man, Sin, and Knowledge

Presented here is a series of notecards that defines an array of topics relating to philosophical and theological perspectives.


Dr. King notes that the psalmist’s view of man in Psalms 12:1 seems to indicate that there are no longer godly men.

Why We Can't Wait Title

This document is a portion of a newspaper that contains the title "Why We Cant Wait" by Martin Luther King Jr.

Problems of Whitehead

Dr. King discusses the problem of metaphysical dualism as presented by philosopher Alfred North Whitehead. Dr. King reviewed much of Whitehead's work while at Boston University and later quoted him in his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

Prayer by Dean L. Harold DeWolf at Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, June 26, 1966

This is a prayer by Dr. King's doctoral advisor, Dean L. Harold DeWold of Wesley Theological Seminary, given at the Civil Rights Rally on the Capitol grounds in Jackson, Mississippi.

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

Letter from Edward P. Gottlieb to Editor, New York Times

Thursday, November 23, 1967

Edward P. Gottlieb writes to the Editor of the New York Times expressing his concern on racial pride. He begins by stating that racial pride is to be deplored and discouraged. Gettlieb concludes with the notion that an African American will feel free only after he is able to explore his own history and culture so he may take from it what he wants for his personal enhancement.

What the Reformation Took Out

This note card lists the effects of the Reformation on Christian worship. Summarizing the consequences, Dr. King notes, "the intellectual element was overemphasized."

Letter from Thomas Maloney to Dora McDonald

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Rev. Maloney thanks Miss McDonald for her assistance and the materials that she sent.

Letter from Mrs. George E. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

The President of the Planned Parenthood Association of Philadelphia expresses disappointment to Dr. King regarding his inability to personally accept the Margret Sanger Award in Human Rights. However, she states that Mrs. King was "a most eloquent substitute." Additionally, she reiterates a request for Dr. King to speak at the Philadelphia Planned Parenthood Association's Annual Luncheon on January 25, 1967.

Telegram from Charles Webber to MLK

Charles Webber, the AFL-CIO's representative for religious relations, sends this telegram of support to Dr. King during his incarceration.

Niebuhr, Reinhold

Dr. King references the preface to Reinhold Niebuhr's book, "Reflection on the End of an Era."

Letter from Danny Cupit to MLK

In this letter, Danny Cupit writes to Dr. King and expresses his joy in reading one of Dr. King's books. He also acknowledges the pleasure of meeting Dr. and Mrs. King after a speech, given by Senator Kennedy.

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from H.M. Arrowsmith to MLK

General Secretary of the British and Foreign Bible Society in Australia, Canon H. M. Arrowsmith, M.B.E., extends Dr. King an official invitation to visit Australia in May 1967. It is the Society's hope that Dr. King's trip will focus primarily on the role of the Bible in relation to the "stature and the status of Man" and the "question of racial equality" throughout the world.

Telegram to W. L. James from Dr. and Ms. King

Monday, January 2, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. King write Mrs. James expressing condolences following the death of her husband. Dr. James was a music educator at Spelman College and a 1923 graduate of Morehouse College . He served as Chairman of the Music Department at Spelman and Director of the Glee Club from 1933 to 1966. Dr. James died December 27, 1966.

Letter from Walter P. Reuther to MLK

Monday, October 26, 1964

Walter P. Reuther extends an invitation to Dr. King to serve as a member of the Executive Committee for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

A Message from Heaven by Eugenia Singleton

In honor of Dr. King's death, Ms. Eugenia Singleton composes this poem. Throughout the piece, Ms. Singleton makes several parallels between Dr. King and Jesus Christ.


Dr. King quotes a passage regarding worship, from Samuel Arthur Devan's "Ascent to Zion."

Time to Retire

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

This New York Times article advocates the mandatory retirement of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover upon his 70th birthday. The article specifically references Director Hoover's description of Dr. King as "the most notorious liar in the country."

Let My People Vote

Dr. King addresses the problem of voting that Negroes in America are encountering and also talks about SCOPE's upcoming initiatives.

Letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt Regarding Discrimination In Employment

In this letter, Fred Poellnitz writes Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding his inability to obtain a job with the U.S. government. He claims that it is due to discrimination in employment.

Letter from MLK to Artist Committee for SCLC

Friday, May 5, 1967

This letter expresses Dr. King's regards and deep appreciation to the Artist Committee for their generous contribution. He communicates gratitude on behalf of so many who benefit from the work made possible from their support. Additionally, Dr. King communicates the continued strength and effectiveness of the SCLC in promoting negro-white unity, non-violence, justice and equality.

The Crisis in America's Cities

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Dr. King provides an analysis of "social disorder" and a plan of action against poverty, discrimination and racism in Urban America. Dr. King states that, "If the soul is left in darkness, sins will be committed."

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

The author argues that the Civil Rights Movement joining the Peace Demonstrators will aid America's enemies and prolong the Vietnam war.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul Kurtz

Friday, January 5, 1968

Dora McDonald grants Kurtz permission to print Dr. King's unedited speech "as is," as long as Kurtz indicates on the speech that is taken from a tape and is un-edited.

Wall Street Journal: Letter to Editor from J. Chico Ramos

Monday, July 22, 1963

Mexican- American J. Chico Ramos gives his opinion to the Editor of The Wall Street Journal on racial issues in America. He objects to the claims that the Civil Rights Movement is going to help all minorities, because while they may benefit negroes, he doesn't feel they have ever benefitted anyone of his own nationality.