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"Baltimore, MD"

Postcard From Jesse Jackson to MLK

Jesse Jackson doubts that Dr. King will be able to bring God to Albany, Georgia.

Letter from W. E. Charlton to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963

W. E. Charlton of the Curtis Publishing Company informs Dr. King of suspicious Saturday Evening Post order subscriptions under his name to different addresses. Charlton explains that they have cancelled the subscriptions and request that he ignore any billing until the fix is complete. Charlton encloses the fraudulent subscription order forms.

God in the Book of Psalms

Dr. King references Bible verse Psalm 71:19. He outlines why the idea of a finite God is incongruent with the "theistic absolutism" found in the Old Testament.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.

Letter from MLK to R. P. Bass, Jr.

Thursday, June 16, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Bass for his contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the progress of Negros in the South and explains the importance of supporters.

Letter from Dudley Babcock to MLK

Saturday, October 14, 1967

Dudley P. Babcock writes to Dr. King to assure him he supports his civil rights leadership but questions his involvement in the Vietnam War protests. Babcock reminds Dr. King that there are always pacifists who might need to accept war in order to prevent more war, citing the example of Neville Chamberlain and the escalation of violence in World War II.

Ritschl

Dr. King records a quote of Albrecht Ritschl regarding Christology.

Letter from Mrs. Robert King to MLK

Mrs. Robert King thanks Dr. King for his work and gives him a "contribution to the cause of Peace."

Schools' Mobile TV Unit Tapes Dr. King's Speech

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

This news article highlights Darien, Connecticut for the use of their mobile television unit to tape Dr. King's speech. The mobile studio was moved to Stamford High School, where students filmed the speech. Ten other schools in the area were able to see Dr. King speak with the help of this new technology.

Letter from T. Jansma to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

The General Secretary of the Baptists in the Netherlands praises Dr. King for receiving an honorary degree from Vrije Unversiteit in Amsterdam and inquires if he is available to deliver any speeches in the Netherlands during the same time period.

The Negro Past and It's Challenge for the Future

In honor of Negro History Week, Dr. King offers this speech on the black community's past and future in America.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

Invitation from Frederick S. Wallin to MLK

Saturday, December 14, 1963

Frederick E. Wallin invites Dr. King to speak at the Alderson-Broaddus College's Civic Interest Week, a weeklong study and discussion on political and economic concerns. He explains that he is inviting the most controversy speakers would seriously appreciated Dr. King's attendance.

MLK at a Communist Training School

This document depicts prominent civil rights and political leaders allegedly at a communist training school. This anti-King document asks the question, "what kind of American are you?"

Eisenhower (His Nationalism)

Dr. King writes a few notes on President Eisenhower's speech made at Lafayette College in 1946. President Eisenhower states that because the United States is the greatest force in the world, it should extend its influence to protect itself.

Letter to S. R. Wise from MLK Regarding Anti-Semitism

Friday, September 29, 1967

Dr. King responds to a telegram inquiry about SCLC and anti-semitism. Dr. King continues on at length about Negro-Jewish relations, excerpting from his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Laurence Pollinger to Joan Daves

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Laurence Pollinger Limited writes to Joan Daves, Literary Agent for Dr. King, to make an offer for the advances and royalties to be received from the publication of "Where Do We Go From Here?" A request is also made for permission to change the title to Chaos or Community.

Letter from Ethel Harvey to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Ethel Harvey writes to Dr. King regarding her desire to support the Civil Rights Movement. She then expresses her ideas towards resolving tension between whites and black relations.

Letter from Mary L. Powell to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

Mary L. Powell writes to Dr. King expressing how she has been following and considering his plans, but disproves of his methods.

Telegram from Melvin Arnold to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962

Melvin Arnold asks Dr. King to approve either "The Strength to Love" or "The Cost of Love" as the title of Dr. King's book.

Letter from E. L. Gayden to MLK

Tuesday, February 14, 1967

E. L. Gayden writes Dr. King regarding the planning of pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Gayden offers the services of the John Brown Monument and Historical Association for the organization of the tour. He also mentions that he represents a travel agency and extends his assistance to Dr. King.

Invitation from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, February 25, 1963

In this letter Harper & Row publishers are requesting Dr. King's presence at a seminar for clergymen, theologians, and laymen. The seminar will discuss how the ministry is affected by cultural changes in society. It will be a weekend retreat and Harper & Row are willing to assume all travel expenses.

The Weaknesses of Liberal Theology

In this paper from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King discusses his thoughts regarding liberal theology, which he thinks is the most logical theology that exists. There are weaknesses, however, one being that it often loses itself in higher criticism.

Revelation as a Way of Knowing

Dr. King quotes and discusses Henry Nelson Wieman’s view of revelation and knowledge as described in “The Source of Human Good.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Letter from Raymond Lavyrick to MLK

Mr. Lavyrick informs Dr. King that he enjoyed his address concerning the Vietnam War. He explains that President Johnson is not concerned about the issues of the war and that he was recently heard misquoting the Bible.

Letter from David Pope to MLK

Sunday, November 6, 1966

David Pope extends an invitation for Dr. King to come to Australia. Pope continues to state his solidarity for the Civil Rights Movement in the United States and speaks to the international commonalities of social justice issues.

Letter from Everett McKinley Dirksen to MLK

Monday, July 6, 1964

Everett M. Dirksen expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter and informs him of the satisfaction he received in being an asset in solidifying the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

People in Action: The South -- A Hostile Nation

Saturday, May 11, 1963

In his regular column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the unfair economic conditions of Negroes in America. He further explains how the employment rate of Negroes in America contribute to economic hardships.

Dr. King Announces Appointments in SCLC Operation Breadbasket

Monday, January 29, 1968

Dr. King announces two major appointments to the SCLC Operation Breadbasket staff. Reverend Jesse Jackson is named National Director and Reverend Calvin Morris is named Associate Director in Chicago. Operation Breadbasket was formed in 1962 to improve economic conditions in black communities throughout the US.

Draft of Statement by MLK on his Involvement With the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers

Dr. King wishes to clarify his endorsement of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. He states that he did not mean to imply that there was a civil rights issue in the "collective bargaining election," but rather that he admires the accomplishments of the labor movement.