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Letter from MLK to Robert H. Gates

Monday, November 25, 1963

Dr. King thanks Robert Gates for his contribution to the SCLC. King encloses an official receipt and expresses that his contribution will assist in their work in Birmingham and throughout the South.

Letter from MLK to Donna Mitchell

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a previous letter sent by Donna Mitchell. He shares the gratification of knowing that young people are aware of "the changing world in which we live." King concludes by stating that correspondence from youth is always welcomed.

Tillch's Significance

Dr. King records Rhode Island Senator Theodore Greene's opinion that German-American theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich is "the most enlightening and therapeutic theologian of our time."

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Letter from Norberto Ibarrondo to MLK

Friday, May 21, 1965

Norberto Ibarrondo, President of Children Organization for Civil Rights, writes Dr. King expressing their desire to replace "discrimination with brotherhood." Ibarrondo informs Dr. King of a fundraiser their organization sponsored and encloses the money as a contribution. Ibarrondo also states that their school is dedicating their yearbook to President Kennedy and Dr. King.

Man

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology” on man as the telos (purpose) of creation.

Letter from Marion Barry and Edward B. King to MLK

Friday, October 28, 1960

Marion Barry and Edward B. King, Jr. extend their gratitude to Dr. King for his work, which has helped the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in its efforts.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."

Letter from Baptist World Alliance to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Baptist World Alliance Church expresses its gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to the Amsterdam Conference, and follows up with a reminder of his promise to consider an invitation from Scandinavia.

Letter from Ernest Evans to MLK about Help

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

Ernest Evans is writing to Dr. King asking him to come by his home while he is visiting Chicago. Evans discusses the problems of his living conditions and the increase in the cost of living. He hopes that Dr. King will be able to bring about positive change for the community.

Letter from J. S. Beckington to MLK

Friday, June 10, 1966

J. S. Beckington, Secretary Treasurer at the Groton School in Massachusetts, encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Margo Belden to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Margo Belden inquires about materials from Dr. King for Choice '68, the national collegiate presidential primary.

Letter from Faye Drake to MLK

Friday, January 29, 1965

Fay Drake of the Youth Department of the St. John Evangelist Baptist Church invites Dr. King to the church's Negro History Week celebration.

Gregory the Great (540-604)

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding Gregory the Great otherwise known as Pope Gregory I.

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

Tuesday, September 28, 1965

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.

Letter from Philip Isely to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Philip Isely, Secretary General for the World Constitutional Convention, asks Dr. King to publicly declare himself as an election candidate as delegate to the Peoples World Parliament and World Constitutional Convention. He states that Dr. King endorsed the idea in the past and encourages him to pursue the candidacy.

Letter from Mrs. Behlen to Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

Mrs. Behlen congratulates Ralph Abernathy for the wonderful job he did during the funeral services for Dr. King.

Letter to MLK from Irving Zipin

Friday, June 9, 1967

Mr. Zipin writes to offer his support for Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, October 31, 1966

The SCEF Executive Board asserts that the attack of black power is injuring the plight of democracy in the United States. The SCEF board declared "the idea of black power has a long and honorable history but it is currently being misrepresented in the news media in the United States."

TV Guide Requests Article on TV's Contributions to Civil Rights

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

TV Guide, in a letter signed by editor Merrill Panitt dated April 11, 1967, invites Dr. King to write an article of 1500 to 2000 words on the positive role television has played in fostering better relations between the races. The previous year, the magazine published a series on television?s impact on society that was largely negative. A proposed series for the 1967-1968 television season would recognize some of the good things television has accomplished. Dr. King is offered $1000 for the article.

Death

Dr. King recalls a quote from British prime minister Winston Churchill and his tribute to King George VI.

Letter of Support from Bishop W.M. Jones

Wednesday, September 4, 1963

Bishop W. M. Jones drafts this correspondence to Dr. King, offering prayers to him and his co-workers.

Man

Dr. King writes about man's estimation of finiteness and freedom.

Letter to MLK from Carolina Smith

Monday, August 21, 1967

The author negatively expresses ideas to Dr. King, in his actions towards the Vietnam War.

Invitation from Gene Joseph to MLK

In this note to Dr. King, Gene Joseph says that he is planning a trip to visit the troops in Vietnam. Mr. Joseph then asks Dr. King to take a special collection that will sponsor one of their members for the trip.

Letter from Joseph W. Harb to MLK

Saturday, April 15, 1967

Joseph W. Harb requests a copy of Dr. King's speech concerning the Vietnam War.

Appeal for Brotherhood to the City of Birmingham

On behalf of the Southern Alabama Movement for Human Rights and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, C. T. Vivian writes this appeal in the "spirit of nonviolent love" to the citizens of Birmingham. His purpose is to awaken conscientiousness and gain their support in creating brotherhood and a better city.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Sunday, March 12, 1967

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam outlines a list of requests for its members, including weekly communications and completed bus questionnaires.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the topic of religion and asserts, "religion is a binding force."

Telegram from Howard Farkas to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Farkas writes Dr. King asking him to address the recent acts of violence targeting African Americans.