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My Dream

Dr. King writes an article entitled "My Dream," which discusses his campaign to "wage war on the big city ghetto." King visits several slums across the North, and expresses his sentiments regarding the infamous slum conditions.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, encloses a memorandum that proposes that the Atlanta Student Movement performs the following actions: "educate and involve the community, convince the Atlanta Board of Education that 'everyone cares,' and force action from the Board."

The American Dream

The is a draft outline of Dr. King's "The American Dream" speech delivered at many colleges, universities and churches throughout the country. Dr. King urges Americans to abandon practices of discrimination in order to protect the American dream and the proliferation of the nation.

Schleiermacher and the Bible

Dr. King references a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher regarding the relationship between religion and sacred texts.

SCLC News Release

Saturday, February 26, 1966

This 1966 SCLC news release relays news of the successful "Crawfordville Enterprises" business venture, one which has brought hope to the rural Negroes of Taliaferro County as a combined initiative of the SCLC and cooperating sister organizations.

Letter from the KKK Kids to MLK

An anonymous member of The K.K.K. Kids writes Dr. King expressing that he or she believes Dr. King to be "a very ignorant person."

Letter from M. L. Phillips to MLK

Sunday, October 22, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Phillips writes Dr. King to inform him that she enjoys listening to him speak on the radio.

Letter from James E. Baine to MLK about Commentary

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

In this letter James Baine asks Dr. King about segregation and integrated for reference to be used in a college class.

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Saturday, March 1, 1958

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

Letter from Joan Sinkler to MLK

Joan Sinkler writes Dr. King expressing that she is disappointed with him for not mentioning "the racist and colonialist character" of the Vietnam War. Sinkler asserts that the US did not go to war to protect Hungary, Cuba or Tibet.

Telegram from Lucious Outlaw to MLK

Dr. King notifies Mr. Lucious Outlaw that he is unable to accept the invitation to speak at Fisk University.

Meet the Press Interview

Sunday, August 13, 1967

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Letter from Henry L. Gerner to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Henry Gerner applauds Dr. King on his accomplishments and what he is doing for the Civil Rights Movement. He also invites Dr. King to speak at Bowling Green State University, a request that is echoed in a letter from Donald Stricker.

Letter from MLK to Sharon Brealer

Tuesday, July 27, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Sharon Brealer for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Clara Graves

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King responds to Clara Bell Graves thanking her for the encouraging letter. Dr. King states, "please be assured that we welcome with grateful heart such letters as the one you directed to me."

Letter from Gino Gullace to MLK

Wednesday, December 1, 1965

Dr. King is asked to participate in a worldwide survey on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life After Death." The survey is sponsored by OGGI magazine a weekly publication in Milano, Italy.

President Kennedy's Record

Friday, February 9, 1962

In this February 1962 column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King acknowledges President Kennedy's appointment of Negroes and executive order ending employment discrimination. But he calls the President “cautious and defensive” in providing strong leadership in civil rights and criticizes him for not ordering an end to discrimination in federally-assisted housing.

Letter from Norman Edward & Katherine Kowal to SCLC

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Impressed by a sermon delivered by Dr. King, Norman Edward and Katherine Ann Kowal contributes to the SCLC.

Sin

Dr. King paraphrases the teachings of Amos about sin. Dr. King writes that Amos condemns Israel for the sins of bribery, oppression of the poor by the rich, sexual immorality and the "self-indulgent use of what has been wrung from the helpless."

Letter from Cees van Gils to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

Dr. King is congratulated for his receipt of an honorary degree from a university in Amsterdam. Cees van Gils requests Dr. King deliver a speech to the Tilburg University community during his tenure in Europe.

TV Guide Requests Article on TV's Contributions to Civil Rights

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

TV Guide, in a letter signed by editor Merrill Panitt dated April 11, 1967, invites Dr. King to write an article of 1500 to 2000 words on the positive role television has played in fostering better relations between the races. The previous year, the magazine published a series on television?s impact on society that was largely negative. A proposed series for the 1967-1968 television season would recognize some of the good things television has accomplished. Dr. King is offered $1000 for the article.

MLK Speaks on Church Bombing in Birmingham, AL

Monday, September 16, 1963

Dr. King speaks on the bombing at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church that killed four girls in Birmingham, Alabama.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

Letter to MLK from A Friend of Justice and Democracy

Tuesday, February 14, 1967

An anonymous individual writes Dr. King to declare that the Jewish people are responsible for the oppression of Negroes.

Letter from Mike Van Ryan to Reverend Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mike Van Ryn addresses this correspondence to Rev. Ralph Abernathy with an enclosure of $20 for the work of SCLC.

Letter from Nathan Watts to MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963

Mr. Watts asks Dr. King to call off the March on Washington because of the political backlash he foresees. He predicts the march will harm the civil rights bill that is being discussed in Congress., which would later be passed as the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Arrignton

Monday, May 16, 1966

Miss McDonald writes on behalf of Dr. King concerning a photograph request. She informs Mr. Arrington that Dr. King will be unable to honor his request due to his apprehension surrounding for profit merchandise.

Letter from Charles C. Holbrock, Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Charles C. Holbrock, Jr. reminds Dr. King that he has written him last November for information for a term paper.

Letter from MLK to C. I. C. Bosanquet

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Dr. Bosanquet for being awarded an honorary degree from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Dr. King deeply appreciated being considered for the degree and for the generous hospitality he received while at the university.