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Draft Letter from MLK Regarding Grand Freedom March

Dr. King addresses his "Brother-In-Christ" requesting assistance for an up and coming March for Freedom held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He makes three requests including financial and social support.

Royalty Statement from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Harper and Row

Monday, April 10, 1967

J. Campe informs Dr. King of the deductions for his royalty check from Harper and Row.

Speech to the Synagogue Council of America

Sunday, December 5, 1965

Dr. King receives the Judaism and World Peace Award from the Synagogue Council of America and uses the occasion to speak about the Civil Rights Movement and international peace. He laments the vehement criticism of dissent and discussion of the Vietnam War and enumerates reasons why the Hebrew prophets are so needed today.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

The following document lists the members of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty.

Letter from Ronald Segal to MLK

Sunday, October 10, 1965

Mr. Segal expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's willingness to sponsor the International Conference on South Africa. He also requests that Dr. King prepare a short paper to deliver at the Conference.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."

Outline of Our God is Able

Dr. King outlines his sermon, "Our God is Able." He plans to explain the good and evil in humanity and ensures his audience that through all, "Our God is Able."

Letter from C. Elden to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

C. Elden urges Dr. King to speak with Cassius Clay, who later changed his name to Muhammad Ali, about his refusal to be drafted into the military. Elden believes that Dr. King's influence will change Clay's mind and make Clay realize that citizens "must fight."

Letter from MLK to Richard Nixon

Wednesday, May 15, 1957

Dr. King follows up a conversation he had with the Vice President Richard Nixon while in Ghana. He expresses interest in meeting with him to discuss problems in the South.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gambbacinni

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Gambaccini's request to the Pope for peace regarding the Vietnam War. Dr. King adds, "As the strength of our world's weapons increases and the war in Vietnam continues to escalate the crying need for world peace becomes greater and greater."

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Letter from Mrs. William P. Camp to MLK

Thursday, October 28, 1965

Mrs. Camp expresses her gratitude for Dr. King's participation in the Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration ceremonies for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Mrs. Camp requests permission to reproduce excerpts from his speech for use in publication of the organization.

Letter from Maryknoll College to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968

Patrick J. Ryan, the Campaigning Committee Coordinator at Maryknoll College, requests that Dr. King provide materials such as his political views, stickers, posters and more to support his political campaign and bring political consciousness to the student body.

Letter from Gloria Kenny to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966

Mrs. Kenny encloses her monthly contribution of $50 to the SCLC and reports that a recent recruitment letter has resulted in 18 potential new members.

People to People: Something Happening in Mississippi

Saturday, October 17, 1964

In this article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, a group of Negroes from Mississippi who displayed the power of nonviolence by challenging the seating of the state's all-white regular Democratic delegation at the 1964 Democratic Convention.

Letter from Gwendolyn E. Coleman to MLK

Thursday, March 4, 1965

Mrs. Gwendolyn Coleman, Secretary of the Raleigh County Branch of the NAACP, invites Dr. King to speak during a Freedom Rally in an effort to unite the community for employment.

Letter from Sonia Schechter to MLK

Wednesday, April 4, 1962

Sonia Schechter, President of Jewish Cultural Clubs and Societies, sends a financial contribution to the SCLC. Schechter also expresses great admiration to Dr. King for his "heroic leadership."

Letter from Walter Davis, Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 11, 1966

Walter Davis, Jr. encloses a donation to SCLC sent all the way from the Congo. Mr. Davis expresses, "Of particular interest to us is the way in which you and your organization are able to get the participation of many groups who are interested in justice and social reform."

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

Friday, February 9, 1968

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Greatness

Dr. King quotes Ernest Fremont Tittle's "The Lord's Prayer," in which Tittle explains how Jesus measured greatness.

Memorandum from Jacob Seidenberg to Participants

Monday, May 11, 1959

Jacob Seidenberg, the Executive Director of the President's Committee on Government Contracts, provides details on the agenda to the participants in the Religious Leaders Conference. Dr. King was one of those participants.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, April 7, 1964

Mr. Randolph addresses his concerns with current events that could potentially harm the Civil Rights Movement. His list of developments includes Malcolm X's promotion of rifle clubs, the use of propaganda tactics to separate white people from the Civil Rights Movement, the increasing totalitarian influence on protest groups in northern cities and demagogic leadership that creates confusion and frustration. Mr. Randolph requests a meeting to discuss how to address these issues.

A Knock at Midnight

Dr. King wrote this sermon for the Youth Sunday Services of the Women's Convention Auxiliary National Baptist Convention in Chicago on September 14, 1958. The sermon builds off of a biblical passage from Luke in which a friend visits a neighbor at midnight for three loaves of bread. Correlating the story to the modern world, Dr.

Letter from Lou House of Chicago's WAAF Radio to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

Mr. House, a representative of WAAF radio station in Chicago, forwards a letter to Dr. King and mentions his hopes for Dr. King and Al Raby to do a weekly report about the Chicago Freedom Movement.

News from the American Jewish Committee

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

This news release announces that John Gardner, former Secretary of Health (among other positions) accepted the head position of the Urban Coalition, a campaign that combats urban poverty.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Letter from Harley Lappin to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

The Public Affairs Committee of Winters College at York University in Ontario invites Dr. King to participate in a discussion to raise student awareness of current political issues.

President's Committee on Government Contracts

Wednesday, June 17, 1959

The Executive Director, Jacob Seidenberg, writes to Participants of the Religious Leaders Conference to send them a roster of people who have attended similar events. These people may be selected to help with the Conference on May 11, 1959.

God's Existence

Dr. King cites Paul Tillich's perception of God's existence. This ideology is a Christological paradox for God "is being-itself" and beyond the essence of existence.