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Telegram from Georgiana Hardy to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Georgiana Hardy, president of the Los Angeles City Board of Education, requests a meeting with Dr. King's upon his upcoming visit to California.

Letter from Dr. King to Earnest Dale

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

This letter serves to acknowledge Earnest Dale's missed call to Dr. King and to thank Professor Dale for his support.

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

Outline on Aristotle

In this outline, Dr. King documents elements of Aristotelian philosophy which deal with ethics and metaphysics. The outline includes a brief biography which chronicles Aristotle's life and a reference to his well known work "Nicomachean Ethics."

The Dilemma of White America

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

Letter from Ernest Evans to MLK about Help

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

Ernest Evans is writing to Dr. King asking him to come by his home while he is visiting Chicago. Evans discusses the problems of his living conditions and the increase in the cost of living. He hopes that Dr. King will be able to bring about positive change for the community.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Altina Carey

Monday, January 8, 1962

Dora McDonald informs Altina Carey that she discussed his letter with Dr. King over the telephone and he looks forward to hearing from Mr. Carey after his meeting with Mr. Killens.

Letter from Floyd Haynes to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Floyd Haynes, Editor of the black-owned "Buckeye Review," invites Dr. King to speak at a civic forum. The event is a joint effort of the newspaper and the Interdenominational Ministerial Fellowship of Youngstown, Ohio. Haynes also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Plowshare Pledge from Sargent Shriver

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This Plowshare Pledge, signed by Sargent Shriver, vows to use voting powers to have the savings of the military expenses invested in domestic human resources.

Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

New Attack on Highlander Folk School

Tuesday, July 16, 1963

The Southern Conference Educational Fund distributed this "Action Memo" to generate support for Highlander High School in a fight against the State of Tennessee.

Letter from Virginia M. Burke & Phyllis M. Banks to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963

Virginia Burke and Phyllis Banks express their interest in distributing "The Negro Is Your Brother", better known as "Letter from Birmingham Jail", to Wisconsin leaders to inform them of the goals and aspirations of Dr. King and his following. Burke and Banks explain that while the document had appeared in multiple publications, they feel that it has yet to reach the wide audience it deserves. They ask Dr. King's permission to reprint and distribute the document if he holds the copyright.

Letter to MLK from Charles Weaver

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Charles Weaver sends a letter of support to Dr. King for all of his contributions to peace and describes him as the ideal Christian prophet.

Harper & Row, Publishers' Royalty Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom

Monday, December 31, 1962

This document, dated in December of 1962, shows a statement of Dr. King's royalties from his first published book, Stride Toward Freedom. Notice that the retail price for the book was in the amount of $2.95. Harper & Row was the company that formulated the publication.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967

In this letter, is enclosed a check from Alfred A. Knopf Inc. for the use of "What Next? Five Negro Leaders Reply" in the book "Minorities In A Changing World by Milton L. Baron.

Letter from Norman Thomas to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964

Noted Presbyterian Minister and pacifist Norman Thomas thanks Dr. King for sending a birthday message that was played at his reception. He further gives his well wishes to Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and hopes to attend Dr. King's recognition ceremony.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Monotheism

Dr. King cites passages in the sixth century BCE Second Isaiah (chapters 40-55) as the first clear evidence of monotheism.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Christianity

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Martin Luther's views on Christianity, accroding to the book, "Concerning Christian Liberty."

Letter from T. Jansma of the Dutch Baptist Union to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

T. Jansma, General Secretary of the Dutch Baptist Union, asks Dr. King to deliver a speech to Baptists in Amsterdam while he is in the city to receive an honorary degree.

Letter from Arthur LeSueur to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967

Arthur LeSueur, a War World II veteran, expresses his support of Dr. King's endeavors to gain equality in America. He hopes that Dr. King will not be discouraged by the great injustices he has faced and will continue to hold strong to his position.

Poor People's Campaign Food Contribution List

This document is a list of the preliminary food contributions for the SCLC's Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Congressman Paul H. Todd to MLK

Monday, October 11, 1965

Florida Democratic Congressman Paul Todd explains to Dr. King why he voted against seating five congressman of the Mississippi Freedonm Democratic Party. Todd based his decision on an earlier precedent, which dismissed a previous claim "because it was brought by a party not legally a candidate for the contested seat."

Letter from Julius Avery to MLK Regarding Vietnam

Monday, May 15, 1967

In this letter Julius H. Avery writes MLK to urge him to reconsider his position on the Vietnam war. Avery expresses his support for world peace but stresses that Dr. King's remarks are volatile and do not warrant "opening the flood gates to Communism."

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Velma B. Hall

Wednesday, October 12, 1960

Mrs. King addressed this correspondence to Velma Hall, in 1960. In this document, Mrs. King extended apologies for the delay in sending her biographical information.

MLK Sermon About Courage and Cowardice

The document is a single draft page from Dr. King's larger work "Strength to Love," with annotations handwritten by Dr. King. On this page, he discusses courage and self-affirmation.

Statistics on Birmingham, Alabama

This sheet shows Negro vs. White Populations in Birmingham, Alabama in regards to voting. It also shows the working wages of the Negro Population according to an article in the Saturday Evening Post.

Letter from Stanley M. Voice to MLK

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Stanley M. Voice writes to inform MLK why he is withdrawing support for SCLC in 1967. He thinks Negro leaders need a unified sense of direction.

A First Step Toward School Integration

This article on the first steps toward school integration includes a foreword by Dr. King. The article goes into some detail about the events regarding the integration of schools in Nashville, Tennessee.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey informs Dr. King of scheduling complications that will delay his response to Dr. King's request to address the SCLC.