The Archive

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"Berkeley, CA"

Letter from MLK to Ernest McCullough

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the University of Toronto Progressive Conservative Association.

Rev. P.A. Berry Invites MLK to England

Friday, June 9, 1967

Rev. Quinland R. Gordon informs Dr. King of a recent letter sent to him by Rev. P. A. Berry. Father Berry is interested in securing Dr. King as a guest speaker at his Cathedral in England on Sunday November 12, 1967.

Letter from Nile Magazine to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

In this letter, Charles Harris informs Dora McDonald about NIle's interest in endorsing a King/Spock political ticket and organizing a successful campaign for Dr. King and Dr. Spock.

National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket

This schedule for the National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket provides a description of the topics to be covered during the convention.

A Thank You for Their Hospitality

Monday, August 13, 1962

Lawyer William Kunstler writes this thank you to Dr. and Mrs. King and discusses a few legal matters.

Moving to Another Mountain

Wesleyan University publishes an edited transcript of a speech given by Dr. King in 1964. The publication is made in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

The Bible

Dr. King records his views of Scott regarding "The Bible." Scott believes that beyond being an "anthology of the noblest religions," the Bible is also an account of history. Even though there is the ambiguity that comes with history, there is also an unambiguous message of the purpose of God and the destiny of man.

Letter from Rev. Sandy F. Ray to MLK

Friday, July 15, 1966

Rev. Sandy Ray (Uncle Sandy), of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Brooklyn, New York, expresses deep appreciation to Dr. King for his sermon "Guidelines for a Constructive Church," delivered at the dedication of their new Center.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Dr. King praises Senator Kennedy's efforts toward abolishing the poll tax in state elections.

Memorandum from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Saturday, February 11, 1967

David Wallace informs Dora McDonald of contributions made to the SCLC from John H. Johnson, George Jones, and Willard Payne, Sr.

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Jimerson

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. King sends a biographical sketch of himself to Gertrude Jimerson and recommends she obtain a copy of Crusader Without Violence, a biography of Dr. King written by Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick and published by Harper and Row.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

Letter from Samuel W. Williams to MLK

Wednesday, February 15, 1956

In this letter, Rev. Samuel W. Williams, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, offers encouraging words to Dr. King.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Regarding Wiley Branton

Thursday, April 29, 1965

In this letter the office of the Vice President informs Dr. King of the new role of Wiley Branton to serve as Executive Secretary of the President's Council on Equal Opportunity.

Recommendations Made to Executive Board of Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, May 24, 1956

Dr. King makes recommendations to the Executive Board of Montgomery Improvement Association. He suggests developing a monthly newspaper to inform friends of the movement activity and scheduling weekly mass meetings.

Letter from Annon M. Card to Robert L. Green

Monday, November 14, 1966

Annon Card, vice president of Texaco, assures Robert L. Green that an investigation is being conducted regarding the circumstances stated in Green's previous letter.

Adverse Message from Dr. Douglas of Sarasota, FL

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

This message from Dr. Douglas was given over the telephone #525-1717 in Springfield, Illinois. Douglas discusses his beliefs on racism and communism in regards to Dr. King. He discusses how communist are the followers of Dr. King, and also how the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to King in order to cause a "communist world revolution." Bayard Rustin is described by Douglas as a "pervert, jail bird" close associate of Dr. King.


Dr. King quotes and comments on Shakespeare's "Henry V."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Spicher

Dr. King informs Mrs. Spicher that he is unable to assist her with the issues from her previous letter due to limited resources.

SCLC Flyer: Going Out of Business

The Fort Worth chapter of the SCLC issued this flyer advising its fellow Negro residents to boycott Bill Sodd's Meat Store because of discrimination.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. Gosta Dahl

Thursday, June 11, 1964

In this letter, dated June 11, 1964 to Mr. Gosta Dahl, Joan Daves expresses the importance of "Why We Can't Wait" and why they feel it is a "...potentially more successful" work than Dr. King's other two books. Accordingly, they request minimum advance and royalty schedules. She asks that Mr. Dahl check with the Swedish publishers to see if they would raise their offer, for the use of Dr. King's work.

Knudson, Albert

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of Redemption."

Letter from Harris Wofford to MLK and Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, November 30, 1957

Harris Wofford, civil rights supporter and friend of Dr. King, proposes "the right next step" for King and the Montgomery Improvement Association. He suggests round-table conferences composed of white and Negro ministers, an idea inspired by the efforts of Gandhi.

Letter from James H. Scheuer to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

James H. Scheuer, a representative of the United States Congress, informs Dr. King about the dismissal of the Mississippi challenge. Despite this action, Scheuer asserts that the attention received is a victory within itself. He concludes by stating "We must all work together to insure maximum enforcement of the Voting Rights Bill".


Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Isaiah regarding topics like ritual sacrifice, knowledge, social ethics, and the doctrine of man.

Statement Regarding Fred L. Shuttlesworth's Court Appearances

Tuesday, July 12, 1966

This document explains Rev. Shuttlesworth upcoming court appearances as a result of his civil rights activities. He faces charges for blocking a sidewalk during a demonstration and for protesting at Drake Memorial Hospital.

Memorandum from Ralph D. Abernathy to MLK

Monday, June 20, 1966

This memorandum regarding SCLC liabilities, income and bank balances, was sent from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. King.