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Summer Session Banquet: The Role of Education in the Civil Rights Movement

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Dr. King gives an address on the role of education in the civil rights movement at Syracuse University's Fourteenth Annual Summer Session Banquet.

Letter from Gertrude Jimerson to MLK

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Gertrude Jimerson requests biographical information for Dr. King.

The Weaknesses of Liberal Theology

In this paper from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King discusses his thoughts regarding liberal theology, which he thinks is the most logical theology that exists. There are weaknesses, however, one being that it often loses itself in higher criticism.

National Council of Churches

Tuesday, January 17, 1961

J. Oscar Lee informs the committee members of the National Council of Churches of Christ of the forthcoming General Committee meeting.

Letter from William T. McKnight to Time Magazine

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

William McKnight communicates with officials at "Time" magazine, thanking them for honoring Dr. King as their "Man of the Year." He feels that their decision to honor Dr. King also gives attention to the plight of the Negro in 1963.

Letter from Bea Subt to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967

The author sends Dr. King a letter informing him that she is withdrawing her assistance toward civil rights workers since he has decided to be a politician, military leader and diplomat. She also questions how he can fight for equal rights in a country that's not worth protecting from the communists.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

Dr. King informs Jack Greenberg that he agrees with a plan to dissolve the Leadership Conference.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Letter from W.J. Hurt to MLK

Sunday, August 13, 1967

W.J. Hurts thanks Dr. King for his tireless efforts to call for an end to the Vietnam war. He notes that although he doesn't agree with Dr. King on most things, he definitely can stand with him on his position regarding Vietnam.

Letter from Milton R. Young to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Republican North Dakota Senator Milton Young thanks Dr. King for a recent telegram expressing his views on pending voting rights legislation.

Epitaph for a First Lady: Eleanor Roosevelt

Upon the death of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, Dr. King wrote this epitaph, calling her "a symbol of world citizenship." In addition, Dr. King commends Mrs. Roosevelt for her commitment to humanity.

Letter from Leonard Manning to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Leonard Manning offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

MLK Lauds Roy Wilkins for His Work with the NAACP

Wednesday, January 3, 1962

Dr. King honors Roy Wilkins for not only his efforts in the NAACP, but also his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

A Call To Action-Lucis Trust

Lucis Trust wrote this "Call To Action" about the vast greivances that were occuring in America, as it related to the issue of race. He identified that African Americans were "condemned to an inferior way of life and excluded as a human being." Trust conveyed that a remedy must be provided for the ongoing injustice. The remedy he proposed is that the attitudes of White Americans needed to change, not only on a non-discriminitory basis, but by creating an atmosphere of inclusivism and goodwill.

Letter from Vivian S. Florence to MLK

Sunday, November 10, 1963

Ms. Florence informs Dr. King she has sent two other letters to the SCLC, both of which included contributions from the United Mine Workers of America. She expresses concern regarding mail tampering due to Dr. King's notoriety.

Harper & Row, Publishers Invoice

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Harper & Row, Publishers issued this invoice to Dr. King for the shipment of ten copies of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

MLK Address at the AFL-CIO Fourth Constitutional Convention

Monday, December 11, 1961

Dr. King delivers a speech at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO to address the lack of equality and rights for laborers and people of color. Dr. King encourages those at the convention to remain steadfast in the fight for social justice in order to overcome the mountain of oppression.

Letter from MLK to Evert Svensson

Friday, May 29, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the Nobel Peace Prize Award nomination, but informs Evert Svensson that there are some roadblocks affecting his acceptance. The race problem in America requires his time, energy and presence in order to prevent the offset of violence. Dr. King inquires if the proposed date for the event could be altered.

Outline of Our God is Able

Dr. King outlines his sermon, "Our God is Able." He plans to explain the good and evil in humanity and ensures his audience that through all, "Our God is Able."

Letter from Wallis E. Wood to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Wood requests an interview with Dr. King to discuss Operation Breadbasket.

Dewey

Dr. King records John Dewey's views on philosophy and religion.

Schleiermacher (Christianity)

Dr. King cites a quote by philosopher Schleiermacher regarding "the God-consciousness."

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bob Alpert

Thursday, March 21, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Bob Alpert of the Hotel and Club Employees Union to thank him for his previous correspondence. Miss McDonald informs Mr. Alpert that she cannot fulfill his request to receive additional copies of Dr. King's article that was published in the "Nation." However, she recommends that Alpert communicate with Carey McWilliams, editor of the "Nation," to receive those copies.

Postcard to MLK on Dallas Police

Monday, March 18, 1968

This newspaper clipping makes reference to an article about the Dallas Police Department's effort to recruit Negro police officers.

MLK Manuscript: Why We Can't Wait

This document reflects one page of the original manuscript of "Why We Can't Wait." "Why We Can't Wait" is a book by Martin Luther King, Jr. about the civil rights struggle against racial segregation in the United States, and specifically in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter From Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Publication Date of the German Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, May 22, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the desire of the German publishers to have a publication date. Joan Daves also inquires if Dr. King has free time for Mayor Brandt.

Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

Letter from MLK to Arthur Stanley

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Dr. King thanks Arthur Stanley for raising funds to defray the salary expenses for David Wallace. He also expresses delight that Mr. Stanley will be attending the Operation Breadbasket meeting.