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"Berlin, Germany"

Letter from Lance Redford to Mrs. King

Lance Redford, a student in New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King.

Invitation from Manitoba New Democratic Party

Thursday, August 19, 1965

B. Swailes, Provincial Secretary of the Manitoba New Democratic Party, extends a speaking invitation to Dr. King to discuss human rights.

Letter from David L. Clark and Charles E. Young to MLK

Tuesday, March 23, 1965

David Clark and Charles E. Young of the University of California Los Angeles write to Dr. King to ask him to speak to the UCLA student body. They express that their students are very interested in the Civil Rights Movement and have planned an entire "Selma Week" to correspond with his speech and raise money for the Selma Movement.

Letter from William Connor to MLK

Saturday, August 12, 1967

William Connor encourages Dr. King to continue his efforts to speak the truth and practice Christianity. He emphasizes that there is no need to ignore the important issues of our time. Connor states, "Now, we've either got to put up, or shut up-as the saying goes."

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.

Letter from Sandy F. Ray Regarding "Holy Land Pilgrimage"

Monday, July 17, 1967

Sandy F. Ray, president of Concreta Tours writes a letter sharing the details concerning Dr. King's Holy Land Pilgrimage. She explains that an office representative recently returned from the Middle East "with first hand information regarding tour conditions there." This document includes a report on hotels, roads, inhabitants, and basic information permitting travel to Israel and the West Bank of Jordan.

Letter From Philip S. Riggs to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, Philip Riggs writes to express his difference of opinion with Dr. King regarding the treatment of House Representative Adam Clayton Powell.

Headquarters Torched After Milwaukee March

This article discusses the destruction of the Freedom House, home of the Milwaukee Youth Council of the N.A.A.C.P. The Freedom House was destroyed by a firebomb, which entered through the front window. Young Negro housing demonstrators attempted to hold a rally on the southside of Milwaukee in support of an open housing ordinance, only to return to a destroyed headquarters. This article was written by Milwaukee's Associated Press.

Letter from Clair M. Cook to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Mr. Cook, legislative assisant to Senator Hartke of Indiana, thanks Dr. King for his recent letter lauding Senator Hartke for supporting the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Cook also recalls his and Dr. King's experience at Boston University.

Worship

Dr. King quotes a passage regarding worship, from Samuel Arthur Devan's "Ascent to Zion."

Predestination

Dr. King defines predestination.

MLK Comments on Jack O'Dell's Alleged Communist Ties

Dr. King attempts to correct the erroneous impressions created by various newspapers alleging Jack O'Dell's connection to "Communist" activities. While Dr. King maintains Mr. O'Dell's strong work performance, the Detroit native will relinquish his role "in order to avoid embarrassment to SCLC."

Letter from Dr. King to Dr. Arland F. Christ-Janer

Monday, November 19, 1962

Dr. King delivered a speech at Cornell College to discuss the problems of racial injustice within the nation. Dr. King expresses his deep gratitude for the hospitality he received during his visit.

Letter from Bea Subt to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967

The author sends Dr. King a letter informing him that she is withdrawing her assistance toward civil rights workers since he has decided to be a politician, military leader and diplomat. She also questions how he can fight for equal rights in a country that's not worth protecting from the communists.

Anglicanism

This note card briefly compares Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism and Calvinism.

Letter from Newsweek to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

This document is a letter to Dr. King from Newsweek noting the enclosure of a quote made, in a column, December 4, 1967.

SCLC Board Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

This document is a proposed agenda for an SCLC board meeting, which includes Dr. King's notes of additional agenda items.

MLK Press Conference Regarding Telegram to President Johnson

Monday, July 24, 1967

Dr. King discusses the social destruction of riots, the high rates of unemployment, and the importance of nonviolence.

Letter from Charles Henry to Ralph David Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Mr. Henry chastises Rev. Abernathy for an adverse comment he made towards White people. As a negro, he urges that the only way to get White people to stop name calling names is for Negroes to do the same.

Letter from Mrs. Berdeax to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Mrs. Berdeax of Ohio informs Dr. King that she supports his position on the war in Vietnam and is ashamed of her country.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Diana Melendez

Friday, April 5, 1968

Diana Melendez, a student at New York City's M.E.S. 146, wrote this letter to Coretta Scott King following a school assembly that announced the death of Dr. King. Melendez offers her condolences and writes that Mrs. King was truly lucky, as she "married a brave man."

Hall Syndicate: LBJ Unveils New Education Plan

Howard U. sends this article to Dr. King with a note asking him to have the students protest its contents, and soon. The article, by Robert S. Allen and Paul Scott, discusses President Lyndon B. Johnson's proposed plan to allow students to borrow from the federal government to finance their college education, repaying the loans through extra income taxes during their working years.

SCLC Newsletter: October-November 1965

Friday, October 1, 1965

This SCLC newsletter depicts the courage of SCLC workers putting their lives on the line while fighting for civil rights. The newsletter also highlights pictures from SCLC's ninth annual convention in Birmingham Alabama and a children's book about Dr. King.

Photograph of Hammond Sound Truck Advertising Freedom Concert

This photograph shows the Hammond Sound Truck advertising a Freedom Concert , which will feature Harry Belafonte, Aretha Franklin, Joan Baez and Dr. King.

The Third Level of Ontological Concepts

Dr. King writes notes regarding the third level of ontological concepts, which "expresses the characteristics of being which are conditions of existence."

Notecard Regarding the Religion of Feeling

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines several and their views on the psychology of religious beliefs. This is an example of one of many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

Sunday, January 7, 1968

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

Invitation from Aubrey T. Edwards to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Aubrey T. Edward, President of the Oakville Branch for the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to make an address during the organizations designated Human Rights year.

Donation Receipt

Thursday, January 13, 1966

This document is a receipt for a donation made to the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Letter from Senator Charles Percy to MLK

Thursday, August 31, 1967

Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that the Senate Housing and Urban Affairs Subcommittee is proceeding to report a bill to the Senate that could become the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1967. The bill would assist lower income families and shrink the gap between white and black America, while expanding the economic opportunities for all.