Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Berlin, Germany"

War

Dr. King records a quote regarding war from General Omar Bradley in 1950.

Letter from LeRoy Allen to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

LeRoy Allen, President of Cheyney State College, invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker for their Founder's Day Convocation in November of 1967. Allen emphasizes the goal of the college to aid Negroes living in urban communities.

Power

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

Letter from MLK to Dr. William H. Allen regarding kind letter

Tuesday, October 15, 1968
New York, NY

Dr. King sent this thank you letter to Dr. William Allen for the prayers and well wishes expressed to Dr. King, as he recovered from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem in 1958. He also conveyed to Dr. Allen that he had been making great progress in his health and anticipated rejoining those working hard in the fight for equality.

Letter from Ludovic Luke Barrie to MLK Regarding World Bible Society

In this letter, Ludovic Luke Barrie grants Dr. King the title “Honary President of The World Bible Society, Inc.” for all of his accomplishments.

Letter from MLK to Thomas R. Jones

Monday, July 29, 1963
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King thanks the Honorable Thomas R. Jones for his financial and moral support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Program for Ecumenical Service in Storkyrkan

Stockholm, Sweden, Oslo, Norway

The following document is a program for an ecumenical service held at Storkyrkan in Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. King provided the sermon for the service that was translated in the Swedish native language.

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

Revolution in the Delta: Farm Hands Go on Strike

Mississippi (MS)

David R. Underhill discusses the strike of farm laborers in various Mississippi Delta cities. Underhill highlights strike procedures, methods, and locations.

Newsletter Regarding Operation Breadbasket

Florida (FL), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This letter serves as an informational letter on the efforts of Operation Breadbasket. According to the letter, this organization, has provided over 900 jobs for Negroes, opened up services for Negro businessmen and offered other types of assistance.

Letter from Marc de Jesus to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Marc de Jesus writes to Mrs. King following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Ben Baldwin to MLK about an Interview

Tuesday, November 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this letter Ben Baldwin of Ring Radio WRNG requests an interview with Dr. King to be part of an all talk radio show, which would open in Atlanta.

Importance of Negro History and Independence

Monday, May 1, 1967

Dr. King speaks to society's misunderstanding of Negro thought and the resulting tensions in race relations. He attributes this misunderstanding to the lack of Negro history authentically represented in books. Contrived myths created by "omission and commission in books" have reinforced prejudice and faulty sense of white supremacy. He observes that illusions cloud reality and render hostility. Society's unresolved problems are aggravated by racial misconceptions.

Letter from Frances L. Lucas to MLK

Monday, July 23, 1962
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Albany, GA

Frances L. Lucas writes Dr. King concerning the actions taken to end segregation in a community in Albany, Georgia. Lucas also apologizes for not responding to Dr. Kings formal letter.

Letter from MLK to John Williams Mannix

Monday, September 23, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs Mr. Mannix that he will not be able to speak in Washington for the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association.

Sin in Psalms

Dr. King writes notes on the topic of sin, quoting Psalm 51:5.

Bibliography Compiled by MLK

Chicago, IL, Boston, MA, New York, NY

This handwritten bibliography documents texts that discuss theology.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Letter to Clark, Dodge and Company from MLK

Wednesday, February 14, 1968
New York, NY

Here is a letter from Dr. King to anonymous donor through Clark, Dodge and Company acknowledging the receipt of stock shares to the SCLC. Dr. King goes on to elaborate on how this contribution will directly impact the efforts of SCLC.

Dewey

Dr. King records John Dewey's views on philosophy and religion.

Letter from G. Mansfield Collins to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

G. Mansfied Collins outlines Dr. King's travel arrangements to a Christian Conference held in Southern California, in which Dr. King is urged to discuss unemployment.

Letter from Clarence Henry to Robert F. Kennedy

Friday, February 2, 1962
New Orleans, LA

Clarence Henry requests the immediate surveillance of Fred Shuttleworth's home by Kennedy's office in lieu of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest.

Letter from Evelyn Rawley to Billy Mills

Friday, March 3, 1967
California (CA), BAHAMAS, FRANCE

Evelyn E. Rawley writes Billy Mills, chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee, to express distaste for Mills' choice of colleagues, political activity, and lack of reason. Rawley affirms that Mill's irresponsible actions are an obstacle to democratic practices.

Letter from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Friday, November 22, 1963
New Orleans, LA

The executive director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. communicates to the recipient that despite the raids by the state and city police, the organization is attempting to continue operations. The police stripped the SCEF of numerous documentation and correspondence information. The director is certain they would be able to obtain success with the moral support in New Orleans and a possible contribution from the recipient. Of significance is the letter's date: the day of President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

MLK Draft Notes: Worship

Dr. King preached this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist church on August 7, 1955. In this handwritten outline, Dr. King focuses on the practice of worship, claiming that it is an intrinsic part of human culture. After outlining a negative definition of worship, he approaches it from a "positive angle," describing a multitude of experiences he deems worshipful. Ultimately, he asserts that worship is useful on both a private and public level as it "helps us to transcend the hurly-burly of everyday life."

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964
Oslo, Norway, Washington, D.C., London, England, New York (NY)

In this letter Ms. Daves informs Dr. King that she is working to solve issue of copyright for his Oslo University address, and stresses the importance of copyrighting all of his "writings...and speeches."

Nonviolence

Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Draft Telegram from MLK to Federation of Teachers

New York (NY)

In this draft telegram, Dr. King addresses the Federation of Teachers enthusiastically endorsing the efforts of New York City teachers to improve their living and working conditions. Dr. King urges the teachers and parents to dispel conflict as they face a contentious Board of Education. Dr. King makes a key point informing parents that it is not the teachers "withholding education but those who have forced them to resort to desperate measures."

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 10, 1957
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

In this sermon, Dr. King states that "love is the key to the solution of the problems which we confront in the world today." Dr. King notes that this is not a simple task, but it is necessary.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA, South Africa, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.