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Stars for Freedom 1967

This magazine highlights celebrities who have contributed to the Civil Rights Movement as well as the contributions of SCLC and other programs across America. Featured in the article is statement by SCLC President, Dr. King.

Meister Eckhart

Dr. King outlines a brief history of German mystic philosopher Meister Eckhart.

Letter from Herbert Coulton to Friends

Herbert Coulton, SCLC Director of Affiliates, encourages more supporters to become church affiliates. Mr. Coulton informs readers that the "SCLC is commonly considered as the Social Action Arm of the Christian Churches in America."

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Thursday, July 30, 1964

A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King to make a tribute for Norman Thomas' eightieth birthday celebration.

Memorandum

Wednesday, September 7, 1960

This memorandum, sent to Dr. King, expresses the need for a convocation between Negro and white Southern leaders. Recent developments, such as peaceful integration of lunch counters and schools, show that whites are respecting equal rights of Negro citizens more.

Science

Dr. King writes about Lewis Mumford’s view in “The Condition of Man” that an increase in scientific knowledge requires an increase in moral discipline.

Letter from MLK to Carl Hayden

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King addresses Carl Hayden to commend him on the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Stanford University Faculty and Staff Pledge of Civil Disobedience

Friday, May 26, 1967

The Faculty and Staff members of Stanford University make a pledge of civil disobedience to protest the Vietnam conflict. The individuals signing the pledge request members of the clergy and academic community with like sentiments to join them in this demonstration.

Social Ethics

This biblical scripture, deriving from the book of Deuteronomy, suggests that people who assist the poor will be blessed.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Bodo Charles Ohly

Monday, July 17, 1967

Dr. King writes Mr. Bodo Ohly regarding the new stanza he wrote to the National Anthem.

Letter from Robert Powell to MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

In this letter, Robert Powell protests Dr. King's participation in a demonstration against the Vietnam War. He also expresses his thoughts on Dr. King's perspective of the war as a "racist war."

Request from The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization inquires if Dr. King would be available to speak to the institute about the concept of Black Power.

Letter from Lisl Cade to Dora McDonald Regarding Various Interview Requests for Dr. King

In this letter, Lisl Cade of Harper & Row Publishers requests for Dr. King to interview with a Washington, D.C. television program and a San Francisco radio program.

Malcolm X Memorial Flyer

This flyer promotes a salute to American freedom and peace fighters at the Malcolm X memorial event held at Stuyvesant High School. The flyer outlines scheduled topics, speakers, and entertainers.

Sin

In this set of notecards, Dr. King discusses "sin." Referencing Biblical verses of Psalms 53:2 and 53:3, he says that "these passages seem to be an explicit affirmation of the universality of sin."

Press Release from Edward Lamb

Friday, October 13, 1967

This press release from Edward Lamb, an Ohio delegate to the 1964 Democratic National Convention, expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and to President Lyndon Johnson, who had pledged as a candidate not to escalate the war.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Israel M. Augustine

Wednesday, February 20, 1963

Dora McDonald forwards a letter from Jessie Owens to Attorney Israel M. Augustine concerning potential legal counsel. Owens sought help concerning money and furniture that were taken from him.

Letter from John A. Race to MLK

Thursday, January 21, 1965

Congressman Race of Wisconsin thanks Dr. King for his letter concerning the seating of the Mississippi Delegates. Race seems to suggest that he was of the majority who "did authorize their formal acceptance" although he states that he was in the "minority."

Letter from Brenda Sepulveda to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A student from New York writes this letter of condolence to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from MLK to Winifred Menehart

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this document, Dr. King is truly appreciative of the encouraging letter he received from Mrs. Winfred Menehart, a native of Minnesota. Dr. King emphasizes on the positivity that rests within her letter, as a facet of hope, amid the contrasting assaults and criticisms he receives daily.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Jessie C. Treichler

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Mrs. Treichler to inform her that she will provide Dr. and Mrs. King arrival time at a later date. She also explains that Dr. King's physician has highly recommended that he limits his amount of events during his travels, therefore she feels sure that he will not be able to commit to all of her suggestions.

Notes from S.B. Well to Ralph Abernathy

S. B. Well forwards Rev. Ralph Abernathy notes about several upcoming and current events pertaining to voter registration in the second and third district of Georgia.

Happiness

Dr. King outlines insight from philosophers Spinoza and Nietzsche regarding the concept of happiness.

Letter from Jim Vickrey to Thomas Offenburger

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

Jim Vickrey of Auburn University requests that Thomas Offenburger, Director of the SCLC Office of Public Relations, provides information regarding Dr. King's background.

Letter from Charles W. Lockyer to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Charles Lockyer sends Dr. King a special limited edition of the International Library of Negro Life and History as a gift. Lockyer explains that the book series is a collaboration between his publishing company and the Association for Study of Negro Life and History.

Letter from J. Reynolds to MLK

J. Reynolds expresses his opinion on Dr. King's recent activism in Memphis and describes it as a "riot." Mr. Reynolds questions Dr. King's intentions and highlights the negative outcome of the demonstration.

Letter from Donald Godbey to MLK Regarding Cooperation

Thursday, June 15, 1967

In this letter, Donald Godbey offers Dr. King various suggestions on how men and women of all backgrounds can join together in unity.

Letter from Gunnar Fagerberg to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964

Dr. King is the recipient of this invitation to speak made by the students of the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden.

Letter from William Mahoney to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

William Mahoney asks Dr. King for his input on a SCLC monthly publication in which he is attempting to create. The publication would seek to educate the public on social, economic, and political problems African Americans endure.