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"Berlin, Germany"

Handwritten Letter from MLK to Dr. Westin

Dr. King writes to decline the invitation of Dr. Alan F. Westin to serve on the Honorary Advisory Board of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties at Columbia University. He cites the urgent demands on his time by the civil rights movement as his reason.

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King writes notes regarding the story of Jesus and the healing of the paralytic. Jesus asked the crippled man, "will thou be made whole?" Dr. King states that some people are happy to be crippled because they lack the responsibilities of life that a healthy man has, and many people cater to their needs, but cautions against this attitude.

Notecard regarding freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's views on freedom, according to the book, "Human Nature and Conduct." This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Jerome S. Ozer to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Mr. Ozer informs Dr. King that his organization will be publishing "Eyewitness: The Negro in American History" by William Loren Katz, which covers the Negro in every aspect of American life. He then requests that Dr. King write an introduction for the book.

Letter from Jim Morton to Members of the UTC Board of Directors

Wednesday, June 28, 1967

Jim Morton communicates the results of the executive committee conference call in preparation for a board member conference call at a later date. The Urban Training Center for Christian Mission is dedicated to community action and supports additional organizations. The training center is attempting to input a new training program and have appointed three staff positions.

He Was a Moment in the Conscience of Man

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

This article discusses the importance of preserving Dr. King's teachings and legacy.

Fund Raiser Event for the SCLC

Mrs. Richard Gile expresses her admiration to Dr. King for his work with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. The La Fleurs Garden Club wishes to sponsor a Benefit Freedom Tea event to raise money for the SCLC.

Treitschke

Dr. King references Heinrich von Treitschke, a German historian and political writer, regarding the responsibilities of the state.

Letter from MLK to Sara B. Jackson

Friday, April 13, 1956

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mrs. Jackson for her moral and financial support.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Ellington

Wednesday, July 28, 1965

Dr. King writes Ruth Ellington of New York to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He describes the current efforts of the SCLC and explains the importance of supporters for the continuation of the SCLC.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

Telegram from Lavinia Underwood to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965

Lavinia Underwood writes Dr. King to discourage the possibility of a march that could strain relationships with white people.

Letter from Ruth H. Bunche to MLK

Saturday, September 9, 1967

Mrs. Ruth H. Bunche appeals to Dr. King for his financial support for Inwood House, a support system for unmarried mothers. Enclosed is a brochure describing the program and its services.

Anonymous Letter to Charles C. Diggs Jr.

This anonymous letter to Congressman Charles Diggs, Jr. of Michigan details the grievances suffered by Negro and Caucasian females in the U.S. Army. The authors assert that they routinely are subjected to segregation in public accommodations and are denied equal opportunity for promotion and reenlistment.

Letter from H. Ladd Plumley to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

H. Ladd Plumley, the Chairman of the National Emergency Committee of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, writes to Dr. King to inform him that President Jonson asked them to spearhead a citizen-action program to fight crime. In response to these requests, they are planning on holding a conference and hoped the Southern Christian Leadership Conference would appear and be listed as a co-sponsor of the event.

Telegram from Milton Powell to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960

Upon Dr. King's recent arrest, Milton Powell, the executive chairman of CORE, sends his whole-hearted support on behalf of the organization.

Letter from Sushil Joseph to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963

Sushil Joseph, a student at the University of Denver, informs Dr. King of a term paper he is writing on the subject of "Church and the Race Relations." Joseph would like Dr. King to answer one of the questions he enclosed with this letter to aid him with his paper.

Letter from US Attorney Charles L. Goodson to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963

U.S. Attorney Charles L. Goodson informs Dr. King that the Justice Department for the Northern District of Georgia intends to work closely with King by offering facilities and assistance.

Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.

Letter from Wolfgang S. Homburger to MLK

Tuesday, October 17, 1967

Mr. Homburger, Assistant Director for the Institute of Transportation Studies in Berkeley, requests additional information from Dr. King before responding to his appeal for funds.

Outline on Aristotle

In this outline, Dr. King documents elements of Aristotelian philosophy which deal with ethics and metaphysics. The outline includes a brief biography which chronicles Aristotle's life and a reference to his well known work "Nicomachean Ethics."

Program - Dexter Avenue Baptist Church 18th Anniversary Banquet 1957

Friday, December 13, 1957

The printed program, shown here, was for an anniversary banquet, in celebration of the 80th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, in Montgomery, Alabama. Dr. King became the pastor at Dexter Avenue from 1954-1960. Mr. T.M. Alexander, of Atlanta, Georgia, is listed as the keynote speaker. Dr. King delivered the invocation and closing remarks for the anniversary banquet, held on December 13, 1957.

Letter from Devi Prasad to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968

Devi Prasad, the General Secretary of War Resisters' International, wrote Dr. King to inform him of a leaflet to be published and distributed. The leaflet contained information about the Declaration of Human Rights. Enclosed in the letter is an example of the leaflet.

Letter from Howard W. Rogerson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Howard W. Rogerson of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights writes Dr. King seeking his opinion and advice regarding a "technical publication for disseminating information on current activities and publications in the field of civil rights."

Success and Failure Sermon Outline

"Success and Failure" is the title of a sermon given by Dr. King. The handwritten outline, shown here, referenced Philippians 3:13 as the passage of scripture. The date and location, of which this sermon was delivered is unknown.

Letter from Marshall Breland to MLK

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Marshall Breland, a student from P.S. 200, requests information from Dr. King for the purposes of a school related assignment. Breland deems Dr. King "The Non-Violent Crusader".

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Monday, April 17, 1967

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

The Hard or the Easy Way?

Thursday, October 5, 1961

The Southern Regional Council discusses the topics of school segregation and integration in specific southern states and counties, especially Yancey County, North Carolina.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dr. King writes Richmond M. Rudden to decline an invitation to speak at Lafayette College due to upcoming non-violence workshops, voter registration drives and SCLC fundraising activities.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Dr. King's "Three Lives for Mississippi" Preface

Friday, May 7, 1965

In this letter to Dora McDonald, Dr. King's assistant, Joan Daves writes that she has received Dr. King's preface for the foreign editions of "Three Lives For Mississippi."