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"Birmingham, AL"

Letter from MLK to O. J. Tyler

Monday, April 9, 1962
Virginia (VA)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Tyler for his words of encouragement and encloses an autographed photograph. Dr. King also sends his best wishes to the people he encountered in Virginia.

Letter from Neil Sullivan to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967
California (CA), Berkeley, CA

In this letter, Superintendent of Schools Neil Sullivan writes about the complete integration of the Berkeley County Public Schools.

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding a Japanese Edition

New York, NY

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, requests permission from Dr. King to proceed with the Japanese edition of his book "Strength to Love" per the terms outlined in her letter of April 13.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Missouri (MO)

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

Letter from Edwin Hoffman to MLK

Tuesday, December 15, 1964
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

West Virginia State College invites Dr. King to address the American Affairs Forum and provides him with select dates to choose from. The college has extended an appreciation for various prime ministers, presidents, attorney generals, and other political figures for their support. Dr. King is congratulated from the college from the receipt of the Nobel Piece Prize.

MLK Addresses the District 65 AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 8, 1962
Florida (FL), New York (NY), Albany, GA, GERMANY, Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Jackson, MS, Montgomery, AL, ITALY, FRANCE, JAPAN

This is an address given by Dr. King to District 65 of the National AFL-CIO Convention in Miami, Beach. Dr. King recognizes their contribution to the Southern Christen Leadership Conference.

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Louisville, KY

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

MLK on the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Finch to Mr. M. Nance, Jr.

Friday, February 16, 1968
Florida (FL), Orangeburg, SC

This letter, dated February 16, 1968, was written to Mr. M. Nance, Jr. from Mrs. Finch. In this letter, she states that while the situation in Orangeburg is "regrettable" it can be fixed. She says that other ethnic groups would not lead demonstrations as blacks have. She says black people lack "imagination and energy''. Finch states that while she believes blacks have suffered "grievances, she has contempt for so-called "free loaders".

Letter from MLK to James Duckrey

Thursday, March 19, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King responds to a request to serve as the speaker at Cheyney State College's 1964 Commencement ceremonies. He informs the college's president that he has another commitment on the same day that renders him ineligible to accept the invitation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. Baum

Monday, February 28, 1966
London, England

Dora McDonald writes H. Baum requesting that he relay to Monica Wilson that Dr. King has accepted her invitation to speak at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King informs Jack Greenberg that he agrees with a plan to dissolve the Leadership Conference.

Letter from Charles A. Halleck to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Charles A. Halleck expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter outlining his reasons for opposing the seating of the five congressmen for the state of Mississippi.

Letter from MLK to William A. Rutherford

Wednesday, November 23, 1966
SWITZERLAND, Chicago, IL

Dr. King encourages Mr. Rutherford that he would be a great asset to the S.C.L.C. and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Gaylord Nelson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Gaylord Nelson, a United States Senator from Wisconsin, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter to Joan Daves to Philip Hanson

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York, NY

Here Mr. Hanson conveys his appreciation for the permission to include words from Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", in his performance "The Rebels".

Letter from William L. Hudson to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
San Francisco, CA

William Hudson of the Commonwealth Club of California extends his gratitude to Dr. King for an address given to the Club.

Co-Op Movements for Black Economic Development

Chicago, IL, California (CA), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Illinois (IL)

This memorandum sent to Dr. King by Professor St. Clair Drake, is a full proposal for the development/revival of the co-operative movements among negroes in large urban centers.

Letter from M. I. [MS illegible] to MLK about Civil Rights

In this letter the writer asks Dr. King to continue the quest for civil rights and comments on the war in Vietnam.

Telegram from Mrs. Terry Brown to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965
Montgomery, AL, Michigan (MI)

Mrs. Terry Brown writes Dr. King reflecting on her participation in the Great Freedom March. She also expresses to Dr. King how his words are a source of inspiration.

Letter from Bernard Hollowood to MLK about Writing an Article

Thursday, July 28, 1966
London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

"Punch" editor Bernard Hollowood asks Dr. King to write an article focusing on the following question: "Is America capable of solving its own race problems?" The article would be part of a series of articles focusing on whether the United States can be trusted as leader of the Western World.

I Have A Dream

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
CONGO / ZAIRE, SOUTH AFRICA, BELGIUM, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, MEXICO, PUERTO RICO, VIETNAM, SOUTH KOREA, TAIWAN, THAILAND, Chicago, IL, CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Cleveland, OH, JAPAN, FRANCE, ZIMBABWE, New York (NY)

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Letter to Ralph David Abernathy from Allen L. Johnson

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
Mississippi (MS)

Southern Christian Leadership Conference board member Allen L. Johnson wrote this letter to Rev. Abernathy shortly after Dr. King's death. Johnson expressed his support of Rev. Abernathy's leadership of the organization.

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Gates

Monday, November 25, 1963
Missouri (MO), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King thanks Robert Gates for his contribution to the SCLC. King encloses an official receipt and expresses that his contribution will assist in their work in Birmingham and throughout the South.

Letter from Clyde Rembert to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967
Dallas, TX, VIETNAM, New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Clyde Rembert, a broadcaster from KRLD-Radio and KRLD-TV, writes Dr. King inviting him to the radio show. Rembert seeks a response from Dr. King regarding a derogatory statement made by Dr. Criswell concerning King's anti-Vietnam war stance.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from R. A. Peterson

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
San Francisco, CA

This letter of condolence, originating from a Bank of America executive in San Francisco, CA and addressed to Mrs. King. The writer expresses hope that Dr. King's work and legacy will carry forward in his tradition of nonviolence.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

New York (NY), Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Briefing Sheet on Cleveland's Civil Rights Issues

Ohio (OH)

This document contains the briefing notes on Cleveland's Civil Rights Issues.