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"Birmingham, AL"

Letter from Gunnar Jahn

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Gynnar Jahn organizes a delegation of Nobel Peace Prize winners who will have a discussion about the Vietnam War.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Job and Suffering

Dr. King writes on the biblical figure Job and his view of suffering.

Letter from Tom Cochran to MLK

Mr. Cochran highlights the need for more responsible leadership within the Civil Rights Movement and also more involvement from middle-class Americans.

Introduction to an Educational Program on Nonviolence

Monday, September 26, 1966

This document explains the purpose of an educational program on nonviolence. The document then goes into specific details on the curriculum taught in the workshops for nonviolence.

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter from San Francisco Vietnam Committee to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

The San Francisco Vietnam Committee invites Dr. King to speak for their anti-Vietnam War rally. Dr. King would begin making statements against the Vietnam War during the fall of 1965.

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

Sunday, April 10, 1966

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Letter from Ann and George Laringer to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967

George Levinger's extends his gratitude to Dr. King for his stand against Vietnam. Levinger states, "One can preach nonviolence at home and ignore the violence abroad."

Letter from Donald Lincoln Cook to MLK

Monday, January 24, 1966

Donald Cook lauds Dr. King's efforts to persuade military forces to leave Vietnam. In response to a speech on Vietnam given by Dr. King, Cook agrees that "the Negro should have special interest in the plight of the Vietnamese." He further encourages Dr. King to stand firm in his position to bring a moral conscience to the nation.

The Alberton Family Sends Condolence Offerings

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

The Albertson family sends to Rev. Abernathy and Rev. Young their condolences for Dr. King's death in the form of contribution and encouraging words.

Letter from Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission to MLK

Friday, June 26, 1964

In an effort to reduce the number of school dropouts, Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission requests to include Dr. King in their upcoming brochure. Ducey asks to include Dr. King's photograph and a quotation from a speech he delivered at Chicago's Soldier Field which highlighted academic achievement as a necessity.

Social Ethics in Psalms

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in Psalms 72.

Telegram to Dr. King Regarding "Camp In At the United States Senate"

Friday, October 27, 1967

In this letter, Lucious President share his opinion about Dr. King's actions at the Senate. "A massive camp in at the United States Senate is contrary to God's teaching. You will not have God on your side."

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Sunday, September 30, 1962

This SCLC Newsletter includes several articles written by Dr. King and Wyatt Tee Walker. Some of the article titles include: "The Terrible Cost of The Ballot" and "THE CONGO, U.S.A. Albany, Georgia."

SCLC Confab Boasts Galaxy of Civil Rights Stars

The SCLC has chosen Birmingham, Alabama as the place for their Sixth Annual Convention. It includes the Annual Freedom Dinner, that will honor the top personalities identified with the Negro struggle. The convention also includes presentations from major authorities on nonviolence.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

Book Outline: Education and the Urban Poor

This book outline lists the chapters and contributing authors of the publication "Education and the Urban Poor." The authors represented include educational professionals from all over the country including Robert L. Green, Associate Professor at Michigan State University and Education Director for the SCLC. Dr. King is listed as the author of Chapter Two entitled "Education and the Negro Revolution."

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

Stanley Levison Suggests Use of Radio

Thursday, September 8, 1966

Stanley D. Levison, New York businessman and close friend to Dr. King, suggests to increase the use of radio as a means to reach masses of American citizens in the fight for civil rights.

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

Racism Blocks Social Aid to Needy

Sunday, November 12, 1967

Dr. King writes that overcoming inequality in America will require a "revolution in attitude and values." He calls for a guaranteed annual income and a Bill of Rights just for the disadvantaged.

Letter from FBI Director John Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, thanks Dr. King for his telegram regarding the work of Special Agents of the Bureau in Alabama.

Congratulations to MLK from Michael Engel

Saturday, December 19, 1964

In this letter dated December 19, 1964, Michael Engel sends his congratulations to Dr.King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize. He also asks for a picture of Dr.King for his scrapbook.

Letter from MLK to Louis O. Kelso

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Attorney Louis O. Kelso for sending him an autographed copy of, "How to Turn Eighty Million Workers into Capitalists on Borrowed Money."

Letter from Freddye Henderson of Henderson Travel to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Freddye Henderson encloses information regarding flight schedules, rates for transportation, and suggested hotels for Dr. King's trip to Oslo, Norway.

Letter from Gordon Bryant to MLK

Tuesday, February 9, 1965

Gordon Bryant, a representative of the Parliament of Australia, extends an invitation to Dr. King to assist the Aboriginal people of Australia in gaining equal rights.

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.

Telegram from MLK to Cesar Chavez

Dr. King commends Cesar Chavez for his personal sacrifice and commitment to the use of nonviolence as a way to achieve justice.

Telegram from Milton Powell to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960

Upon Dr. King's recent arrest, Milton Powell, the executive chairman of CORE, sends his whole-hearted support on behalf of the organization.