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"Birmingham, AL"

Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change

The conference on "Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change" at Howard University contains various speakers deriving from various academic disciplines. Dr. King participated in the lecture and discussed how nonviolent methods impacted individuals, especially the youth.

MLK Addresses the Atlanta Press Club

Wednesday, November 10, 1965

Dr. King discusses the struggle for racial justice and the concept of goodwill with the Atlanta Press Club. He stresses that any opposition in the fight for equality will inevitably fail in the face of a unified effort across America.

Telegram from Thomas K. Gilmool and David N. Wice to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 13, 1967

Mr. Gilmool and Mr. Wice write to confirm the date that Dr. King will be speaking at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

Birmingham Manifesto

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Schedule with Publisher

Monday, May 4, 1964

Joan Daves provides details for the Monday, June 8th schedule that Dr. King's publisher would like to set up. The day starts off with the Today Show and ends with a cocktail party.

Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council, Inc. Presents MLK

Sunday, April 19, 1964

This document contains a program for Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council's mass planning meeting for a three-day workshop on nonviolence at Bethel Baptist Church. Also included in this document are lyrics to "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "We Shall Overcome."

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967

Rodney Clurman requests that Dr. King attend a ten-day trip supporting various people and organizations.

Black Marches and White Hysteria

Monday, August 15, 1966

This editorial by WBBM-TV in Chicago, a CBS station, highlights recent civil rights marches and the corresponding white hysteria. Carter Davidson, editorial director, discusses the marches and the middle-class citizens who displayed Nazi swastikas in response.

Statement from Grace H. Giles

Grace H. Giles writes Reverend Ralph Abernathy and requests that he share a vision with her. She also includes several meaningful words and acronyms that she created.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966

Here Joan Daves informs Dr. King on the availability of Hermine Popper, who will be working on a manuscript with Dr. King.

Letter from Mary Doggette to the SCLC

Monday, March 15, 1965

Mary Doggette encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC that was collected from several Riverside Health Center employees in New York City.

Weatherhead on Love

Dr. King records a quote from Leslie Dixon Weatherhead's "Why Men Suffer."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Dr. King writes Mrs. Dilday of Riverside Baptist Church to express his appreciation for her two contributions to the SCLC. He explains the current works of the SCLC in Chicago and Alabama and stresses the importance of supporters like her.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to John H. Calhoun

Dr. and Mrs. King deliver their condolences for the recent passing of Mason, brother of John H. Calhoun. The Kings informs Mr. Calhoun that he is not alone in his hour of mourning and that the community is also suffering this great loss.

Thank You Letter from Mary Keller to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

This letter from Mary Keller to Dr. King thanks him for his speech given at Grosse Pointe High School on March 14, 1968. Keller apologizes for the behavior of some "troublemakers" during the event.

Letter from Jim Robert Davis to MLK

Jim Robert Davis tells Dr. King how his presence in Chicago's Lawndale community have caused many of his fellow neighbors to clean their neighborhood. He pens a small but inspriational poem under the subject "The Glory of Blackmen."

Letter from Rev. Hazel E. Foster to MLK

Thursday, July 14, 1966

Reverend Hazel Foster writes to Dr. King in support of his continuous struggle. He talks about memorizing the Sermon on the Mount and the importance to him and leaders like Gandhi. He offers words of encouragement and prays that Dr. King may find peace during these hard times.

God

Dr. King notes that Jeremiah 9:23 speaks of man's ability to know and understand God in contrast to modern theology's claim that God is beyond knowing.

Letter from MLK to Rev. W.W. Finlator about Preaching Invitation

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King offers deep regrets to Rev. Finlator for his inability to accept an invitation to preach at The Pullen Memorial Baptist Church.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard

Friday, September 15, 1967

Dr. King sends his condolences to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard following the death of her husband. Dr. King also mentions the importance of Dr. Hubbard's contributions to the Montgomery bus boycott.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

Governor Nelson Rockefeller writes Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?".

MLK on Danville and the Problem of Violence

Friday, July 12, 1963

Dr. King discusses his perception of the nonviolent movement, and how the leadership maintains control even though minimal violent outbreaks may occur.

Photo of MLK

An unidentified photo of Dr. King from the Morehouse Collection.

Angeology

Dr. King cites the reference in Isaiah 6:2 to a seraphim, likely "a winged human figure."

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Coretta Scott King

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

In this letter, Harry G. Boyte offers his personal admiration to Mrs. King for the "strength [she has] provided Dr. King."

Letter to MLK from John Yungblut

Monday, January 9, 1967

John Yungblut writes to inform Dr. King about a conference to take place at Georgia State College. It will discuss China-United States relations and he would like for Dr. King to lend his sponsorship. Yungblut was the director of Quaker House, a civil rights and peace organization in Atlanta in the 1960's.

Letter from George W. Cooke to MLK Requesting Autograph

Mr. George Cooke of Great Falls, Montana requests Dr. King's autograph on a Time Magazine cover where his photo appeared. Mr. Cooke further states he has been collecting autographs for over 7 years and has more than 300 autographs.

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Thursday, December 20, 1956

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Monday, April 17, 1967

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.