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"Birmingham, AL"

Letter from Yolinda Pelmore to MLK

Friday, December 8, 1967

Yolinda Pelmore, a young student, asks Dr. King how he became famous. The reading theme for her class prompted her to write.

Letter from Henry H. Arrington to Paul Whelehon about P. Ballantine & Sons Employment of Negroes

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The letter references letters between Arrington and John Farrell, regarding the employment of a Negro representative. Mr. Kiah Sayles, a representative of P. Ballantine & Sons, explained that P. Ballantine & Sons was the first company to hire Negro models which elevated Negroes in executive positions. Sayles went on to explain the liberal hiring policy of Coyle Beverage, a distributor of P. Ballantine and Sons.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles B. McConnell

Thursday, October 31, 1963

Dr. King thanks Rev. McConnell for his words of encouragement and financial contribution following the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King explains that Americans of all races and ethnicities must join together in this common cause to achieve American community.

Injunction Requested by the City of Birmingham against Protests

The City of Birmingham submitted this "bill of injunction" to the Circuit Court of Alabama to try to stop the sit ins, boycott pickets, and marches led by Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC, and others in April of 1963. After the injunction was granted and served April 10th, they continued their civil disobedience and many more were arrested. From solitary confinement, Dr. King then wrote "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."

Letter to S. R. Wise from MLK Regarding Anti-Semitism

Friday, September 29, 1967

Dr. King responds to a telegram inquiry about SCLC and anti-semitism. Dr. King continues on at length about Negro-Jewish relations, excerpting from his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah demonstrating God's wrath.

Letter from MLK to Alan Bible

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Alan Bible, a United States Senator from Nevada, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

March on Washington Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This document outlines the program held at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Letter from MLK to Elder Grant

Dr. King declines an earlier proposal suggested by Mr. Grant, due to a lack of resources and time.

Letter from MLK to Miss R. Berkenvelder

Monday, November 22, 1965

Dr. King writes to Miss Berkenvelder, agreeing that silent and non-active individuals maintained the severity of injustices. He further elaborates on his prayer that warriors will form who are committed to nonviolence and world peace.

Letter from M. L. Banner to MLK

Friday, September 13, 1963

The board of directors of the Booker T. Washington Center, Inc. requests Dr. King to serve as the guest speaker for their annual banquet. The Booker T. Washington Center is the only predominately Negro Welfare Agency in the community.

Letter from Samuel F. Daly to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

The author suggests Dr. King reclaim his leadership of the civil rights movement from Stokely Carmichael and Rap Brown.

Peace and Freedom Party

Sunday, January 1, 1967

The Peace and Freedom Party was originally established in the Northern region of California in 1967. This pamphlet features the party's political platform in addition to voter registration procedures.

Evil, Forgiveness, God

Dr. King references the Old Testament Book of Psalms regarding the topics of evil, forgiveness and God. He asserts that we must always treat the poor with love because God loves them.

Letter from MIT/Harvard Joint Center for Urban Studies to MLK

Thursday, July 6, 1967

In this letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Director Daniel P. Moynihan asks Dr. King to assist him and his organization by advocating for an increase in funds for the 1970 Census. The purpose is to "improve the enumeration of Negroes, Puerto Ricans, and Mexican-Americans".

Letter from Dora McDonald to Reverend Goulding

Reverend Goulding encloses a copy of a letter from Dr. King to Dr. Ruden.

Telegram from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

Joan Daves inquires if Dr. King can attend the January Herald Tribune Book and Author Luncheon.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Ericson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mr. and Mrs. Ericson are expressing their immense support for Dr. King and his humanitarianism. They stress the importance to look beyond the racial lines and focus on a more cohesive world community.

MLK Examination Book for Bible Course

Tuesday, March 26, 1946

Dr. King answers a number of questions for an exam in his Bible course. He covers diverse topics, including prophecy and the Book of Job.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Friday, May 20, 1966

Mr. Clark, a representative of the United States Senate, requests a written statement from Dr. King concerning a recent Bill (2993) up for election.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John A. Clark

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Reverend Clark regarding the church's lax position on "racial justice and brotherhood among men." Although he cannot participate in Reverend Clark's suggested campaign, Dr. King encourages the minister to move forward with his plans of establishing a revival campaign to preach "the message of Our Lord at every opportunity."

Letter from MLK to Rev. H. Edward Whitaker

Tuesday, April 3, 1962

Dr. King responds to a letter from Rev. Edward Whitaker, regarding Whitaker's desire to be a college minster. He expresses to Whitaker that his experience should serve him well for such a responsibility. Dr. King and Rev. Whitaker were classmates at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Carl A. Auerbach to MLK

Monday, December 6, 1965

Carl A. Auerbach has declined to make contributions to the S.C.L.C based on the assumption that Dr. King will use the funds for protest movements "against the American policy in Vietnam."

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 20, 1966

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.

SCLC Financial Report

Ralph D. Abernathy releases the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Annual Fiscal Report for 1962-1963.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Publication Deadlines

Monday, January 30, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves provides feedback on Dr.King's chapter on "Black Power,"and she informs Dr. King that she is waiting for chapters on "White Backlash" and "What It Means to be a Negro in America," for his book "Where do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Letter from Ernesto R. Rodriguez, Jr. to MLK

Friday, September 2, 1966

Ernesto Rodriguez invites Dr. King to address the College Editors Guild Alumni Association at their 35th Anniversary Celebration.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul Kurtz

Friday, January 5, 1968

Dora McDonald grants Kurtz permission to print Dr. King's unedited speech "as is," as long as Kurtz indicates on the speech that is taken from a tape and is un-edited.