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"Birmingham, AL"

Letter from Samuel McKinney to MLK

Monday, June 20, 1966

Reverend McKinney, of the Mt. Zion Baptist Church, informs Dr. King he is unable to participate in the Mississippi Freedom March. A check from the Mt. Zion congregation is enclosed to assist with registering voters.

Statement by MLK re Citizen Diplomacy

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Dr. King releases a statement that he was considering communicating by mail with the "major powers" involved in the Vietnam conflict. However; he now believes that with the changing factors of certain groups involved in the conflict, his proposed communication is no longer needed.

Letter from MLK to Kathy Sasso

Monday, April 27, 1964

Dr. King shares his pleasure in being named "Person of the Week" by Miss Sasso's class. He encloses a copy of one of his speeches.

Letter from M. G. Greens to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963

Miss M. G. Green, member of the Church of the Open Door, informs Dr. King of her concern with the Civil Rights Movement and her desire to offer her services as contribution to the cause. She encloses two letters addressed to Reverend Andrew Young, who never responded to her request.

K.O. Mbadiwe Contacts MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

Kingsley Ozuomba Mbadiwe, Nigerian nationalist and politician, informs Dr. King of his travels to the United States. Mbadiwe ensures that he will contact King upon arrival. Dr. King and Mbadiwe were working on a proposal for a solution to the Nigerian-Biafran civil war. A peace mission to Nigeria was planned for April 1968.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Unity

Dr. King documents insight regarding unity, reason, and God.

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Letter from Andrew Young to Professor G. Kuiper

Tuesday, November 2, 1965

Andrew Young, the Executive Assistant to Dr. King, writes Professor Kuiper of Vrije Universiteit expressing his contentment with pair's recent visit to Amsterdam. Young also inquires about the Dutch institution covering the civil rights leaders' travel expenses.

Comment On Proposed Resolution: Ending Racism in the Democratic Party

Friday, October 9, 1964

On October 9th, 1964, the Democratic National Convention adopted a resolution ending racial discrimination in Party membership.

Refinement by Fire

R. Elizabeth Johns describes the events surrounding voter registration in the South and tactics used by civil rights and opposition leaders.

Committee of Responsibility to Save War Burned and War Injured Vietnamese Children

The Committee of Responsibility to Save War Burned and War Injured Vietnamese Children announces a program that will bring war-maimed children from Vietnam to the United Stares for medical treatment.

The Klansman Article Regarding MLK

This article on Dr. King appears in "The Klansman," a publication of the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan of Mississippi. Dr. King, who is here referred to as the "Reverend Riot Inciter" and "Riot King," is alleged to have caused civil unrest in Leflore County and Greenwood, Mississippi.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from British High School Student to MLK

Margaret Blenkins, a fifteen year old student from Northumberland, England, writes Dr. King to ask how she can join the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Curtis Harris to MLK

Monday, February 1, 1965

Curtis W. Harris, of the Virginia State Unit of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, wrote to Dr. King to alert him that the Smithfield Packing Company has a labor situation very similar to that of Scripto in Atlanta. Harris explains that none of the senior Negro employees are in the appropriate income bracket and could use Dr. King's assistance.

Letter from Louis Toney to MLK

Saturday, May 29, 1965

Army veteran Louis Toney attempts to solicit a job with the SCLC, citing military experience, a college degree and ordination as characteristics that qualify him for the job.

Dr. King Sermon Notes

Under the subject, "The Vision of a World Made New," Dr. King drafted these sermon notes. The essential message of the sermon referred to a need for a "new world order". Plato and Karl Marx are two of the great philosophers referenced in this document. Dr. King delivered this sermon at the annual meeting of the Woman's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convetion in St. Louis, Missouri on September 9, 1954.

Value

Dr. King references Ralph Perry's "Present Philosophical Tendencies" and "The Present Conflict of Ideals" in relation to the subject of value.

MLK Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines John Dewey's views on Metaphysics. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches, sermons, and writings.

Letter from Morris Kight to MLK Regarding March on Washington

Thursday, November 16, 1967

This document is a letter from Morris Kight to Dr. King in which Kight expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's efforts and offers his assistance in mobilizing individuals for the planned March on Washington February 1968.

Letter from Esther G. Stone to MLK

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Esther G. Stone writes to Dr. King to express her opinions on Negro leadership, American politics, and the Vietnam War. Stone writes that President Lyndon Johnson has done so much for Negroes and that Mrs. Johnson did not deserve the hurtful remarks of Eartha Kitt.

Letter from Leonard Kane to MLK

Monday, March 15, 1965

Leonard Kane, Chairman of the Democratic Town Committee, sends Dr. King a financial contribution on behalf of the committee. He also expresses the importance of democracy for all.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Baruch Spinoza's "Epistle 21" to Henry Oldenburg.

Letter from Eula Shaw to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Calling Dr. King "The Trouble Maker of the United States," Mrs. Shaw criticizes Dr. King's methods in the Civil Rights Movement. She argues that a "campaign of love is in order" rather than demonstrations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Dora McDonald updates Dr. King regarding the numerous letters, invitations, phone calls and other pending business matters while he has been away from the office. During this period of absence, Dr. King had been imprisoned and was now recovering at home.

Faith

Dr. King quotes William James' "The Sentiment of Rationality" on faith.

Letter from Gordon Allott to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Gordon Alliot, a member of the United States Senate, sends his appreciation to Dr. King for his endorsement for a position on the "historic civil rights bill."

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Commission on Community Activity and Organization lists various members from different organizations.

Letter from Jane Dahlberg to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967

New York University Dean Jane Dahlberg congratulates Dr. King for taking a noble position against the Vietnam War. As a result of his participation in the New York anti-war demonstration, Dahlberg believes that his example of nonviolence was highly emphasized during the march.