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"Birmingham, AL"

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Proposal for Chicago Schools

Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Virginia (VA)

This agenda outlines a strategic boycott of Chicago schools. The information is separated by three individual phases.

Letter from Lionel H. Newsom to MLK Regarding Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Tuesday, July 18, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Lionel H. Newsom, the General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., provides Dr. King with a check for support.

Letter from Vice President Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Crisis in Detroit

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Michigan (MI)

In this letter, Vice President of the United States of America, Hubert Humphrey, writes to Dr. King to thank him for his statements promoting nonviolence in the crisis situation in Detroit, Michigan.

Letter from MLK to Rev. M. Sardon

Tuesday, October 9, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Rev. Sardon for his participation in and support of the Albany movement.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Jaggart to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Mr and Mrs. C. Jaggart express how much they enjoyed one of Dr. King's messages.

Letter from Dan H. Elkind to MLK

Tuesday, August 22, 1967
Florida (FL), ISRAEL

Mr. Elkind discusses recent actions of the SNCC and the SCLC's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign. He believes that the actions made by the SNCC will lead to violence and also "alienate" supporters of civil rights legislation. He views Dr. King's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign to be unlawful, and therefore suggests a different approach for Dr. King to take.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites Vergilius Ferm’s “First Chapters in Religious Philosophy.”

Letter from David Davis to MLK

Tuesday, October 5, 1965
FRANCE, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Davis, Executive Director of American Center for Student and Artists, invites Dr. King to speak for one of their "Meet the Press" evenings in Europe. Davis also provides the names of previous speakers and information regarding the Center's participants and programs.

Letter to the Public of Montgomery, Alabama

Montgomery, AL

The ministerial leaders of Montgomery address the problems of discrimination and segregation within the city's bus system. The ministers form a plan of action to eliminate such practices and attain a equal society for all.

Love and Forgiveness

Tuesday, May 5, 1964
New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), INDIA, St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), New Jersey (NJ)

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

Telegram from MLK to Senator Aiken Regarding Housing

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King urges Senator George Aiken and other members of the Republican Party to support an open housing bill to promote better living conditions in Negro communities.

Letter from Lenore Aikens to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
CANADA

Lenore Aikens congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She also asks how the Christian Citizenship Committee of United Church Women can be a part of the cause.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King writes notes on perceiving God using Nelson Henry Wieman's text, "The Source of Human God."

Religion

Dr. King writes about the role of religion as an ideal and as a unifying force.

K.O. Mbadiwe Contacts MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968
London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Kingsley Ozuomba Mbadiwe, Nigerian nationalist and politician, informs Dr. King of his travels to the United States. Mbadiwe ensures that he will contact King upon arrival. Dr. King and Mbadiwe were working on a proposal for a solution to the Nigerian-Biafran civil war. A peace mission to Nigeria was planned for April 1968.

Letter from MLK to Mr. A. Fouche

Wednesday, February 6, 1963
California (CA)

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Fouche's hospitality during his visit to the Bay Area.

Letter from MLK to Arthur Hamman

Friday, July 21, 1967

Dr. King thanks Mr. Hamman for his previous letter in support of Dr. King and his work .

Letter from Harriet Davis to Dr. King Regarding Eugene Peterson's editorial

Sunday, July 30, 1967
Georgia (GA)

In this letter, Harriet Davis informs Dr. King that she is a white women who has decided to teach at a Fairmont High School, which was formerly completely Negro. Although she has received criticism for her decision she proclaims that her motivations are right. She then informs Dr. King that she fears not being able to understand her co-workers and students.

Letter from Peter P. Bland to MLK

Sunday, April 3, 1966
London, England, Montgomery, AL, UNITED KINGDOM, Alabama (AL)

Peter Bland seeks Dr. King's autograph to add to his collection.

Letter from Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967
VIETNAM, Michigan (MI)

Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff praise Dr. King for his stance on the Vietnam War and enclose a check for the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Eugene Patterson

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King addresses Mr. Patterson's editorials discussing "sincere questions and doubts" about Dr. King's stance on the conflict in Vietnam.

"How To Make History"

Georgia (GA)

Mr. Eisenman acknowledges the irony of how America, which was created after a war of liberation, has now gone against everything it was founded upon.

Christ

Dr. King quotes a passage from Adolf Harnack's "What Is Christianity?" in which Harnack contrasts Plato's focus on the wise with that of Jesus Christ, who finds value in every human.

God (Definition)

Dr. King references Schleiermacher as he attempts to define God.

Letter from National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY

The National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower informs Dr. King of the tremendous strides made by the African American community during the elections in Sunflower County, Mississippi. Four years prior, the loss of elections by black candidates was attributed to local intimidation, but new organizational tactics provided the group with tools to combat this issue. The success of the election set a precedent for many other Mississippi counties to view voting rights as a means to change citizens' lives and the nature of the state.

Letter from Donald W. Morgan to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
Vermont (VT), Atlanta, GA

Donald Morgan informs Dr. King that northern locations such as New England and Vermont experience racial issues. Mr. Morgan serves as the chairman of the program committee for the 1964 Annual Meeting of the Vermont Congregational Conference. Dr. King is extended an invitation to speak at this conference which is located at the Rutland Congregational Church.

Letter from Dora McDonald to A. Dale Fiers

Monday, October 17, 1966
Indiana (IN)

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Fiers an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Dallas, Texas for the International Convention.

Telegram from Duncan Bradford to MLK

CANADA

Duncan Bradford, the executive secretary for the British Columbia Hospitals' Association, requests for Dr. King to make an address at the national convention to speak out against the atrocities occurring around the word.

Religion

Dr. King writes on the topic of religion, stating that the people living in the 18th century regarded religion as "the source of both political tyranny and social conflict."