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The Business Card of the Honorable Al Shabazz (Malcolm X)

During the late 1950s, Malcolm X began going by Malik Al-Shabazz. Shabazz, according to the Nation of Islam, was a Black Nation in central Africa from which all human beings descended. While the date of this card is unknown, it is presumed to be circa the late 1950s to early 1960s, before Malcolm X split from the Nation of Islam in 1964.

MLK on the Seating of Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

Georgia State Legislature has refused to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King expresses his disdain for the social injustice. His plan of action is to combat this prejudice by rallying members of the white and black community to engage in protest.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to the Harris Family

Dr. and Mrs. King send condolences to Katie Harris upon the passing of Alphonso. The Kings remembered Alphonso as "a great and dedicated worker in the struggle for freedom and human dignity."

Tentative Schedule for MLK

This document outlines Dr. King's tentative schedule of cities and states he will tour.

Letter from Ben J. Mack to Reverend Andrew Young

Ben Mack forwards to Reverend Young an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the annual banquet of the South Carolina Congress of Parents and Teachers.

SCLC News Release

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a new release stating Dr. King's demands that the Department of Justice act immediately to halt brutal treatment and intimidation of Negro school children and parents in the State of Mississippi. Dr. King cites several violent and near violent incidents that have occurred in Mississippi during the month of October.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.

MLK Outline - "Beyond Condemnation"

This handwritten note of Dr. King's is one of many such notes and outlines he wrote in preparation for a speech or sermon. The body of this outline references the Biblical passage John 8:2-11.

Letter to MLK from Marie King

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

Marie King writes to express her support for Dr. King.

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Dr. King says that there have been few strides made in school desegregation. He says that schools that comply with the desegregation laws do it at an appalling slow pace. Lastly, he says that although there needs to be more progress in both the north and the south, he has hope for the future.

Letter from James Marley to MLK

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

James Marley, Secretary and Treasurer of the Hotel and Club Employees Union Local 6, encloses a contribution to the SCLC "to aid [with] the great task to obtain equality for all Americans."

Response Letter from Dr. King to Irene Kohlmeyer

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

Dr. King is responding to Iren Kohlmeyer's request to rebroadcast the transcripiton of the address at John Hopkins University. Dr. King gladly informs Kohlmeyer that permission is granted to do the rebroadcast.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Dora McDonald sends H. L. Wynter, Registrar for the University of the West Indies, an estimate on travel expenses Dr. King and Reverend Lee will require for their trip to Jamaica.

Justice in Mississippi

Dora McDonald records notes by Dr. King concerning an unjust ruling in Mississippi. He claims that more legislation is needed to enable the federal courts to prosecute these crimes.

The Jerusalem Post: Martin Luther King's Jewish Associations

Thursday, October 22, 1964

In this article, Dr. Israel Goldstein describes the friendship between Dr. King and the American Jewish Congress, including the degree of Jewish participation in Dr. King's 1963 March on Washington.

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

Letter from Edmund W. Gordon to MLK

Wednesday, September 27, 1967

Edmund W. Gordon, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance at Yeshiva University, invites Dr. King to serve on the Dr. W.E.B. DuBois memorial committee. The committee proposes a memorial park to honor Dr. DuBois in his hometown of Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Faith

Dr. King agrees with Justin Martyr on faith and rationality.

Memorandum from Stanley Levison Regarding Congressman Powell

Monday, September 19, 1966

This memorandum from Mr. Levison concerns legal issues regarding Congressman Adam Clayton Powell. His position is that those issues, valid or not, need examination in the overall context of "the real issue...the undemocratic nature of the congressional system."

U.S. News & World Report: New Negro Threat

Monday, August 28, 1967

U.S. News & World Report reports that Dr. King plans on using "civil disobedience on a massive scale," including marches, sit-ins and boycotts in "riot-torn" Northern cities.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King writes about Bernard of Clairvaux and his idea of the character of the ideal Christian.

Telegram from Elizabeth J. Miller to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

Elizabeth Miller, the Executive Director of the Christian Social Concern division of the American Baptist Convention, extends support to Dr. King while he is in the Jefferson County Jail in 1967. She expresses gratitude for Dr. King's leadership and commends him for his non-violent action.

Letter from Leslie A. Strikes to MLK

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Leslie Strike, Canadian Vice President of the English-Speaking Union of the Commonwealth, invites Dr. King to speak on the US Civil Rights Movement.

Tenth Annual Convention

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Dr. King addresses the achievements the SCLC has accomplished over the past ten years at the Tenth Annual Convention in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King then speaks on the fact that all of the SCLC's achievements are accomplished through nonviolence.

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.

God

This scripture, deriving from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah, illustrates God as holy.

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The writer informs Dr. King that he or she is repulsed with Dr. King and laments the day that "your people get to rule this country."

Letter from Alice Murphy to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Alice Murphy informs Dr. King that she is considering writing a segment about the current situation in Alabama. It is necessary that she speak directly with him, as she does not want to say anything "without some degree of personal knowledge."