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MLK Drafted as a Presidential Candidate Announcement

The Peoples Committee of America drafts Dr. King as their candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election.

Sermon Text (Habakkuk)

Dr. King examines Habakkuk chapter 1, verses 2 through 4 to discuss whether the inequalities of life are justification to question God.

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

The author argues that the Civil Rights Movement joining the Peace Demonstrators will aid America's enemies and prolong the Vietnam war.

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Ms. Saum applauds the positive attitude and accomplishments of organizations like the National Urban League, which she contrasts with the marches and riots that she feels hinder goodwill and cooperation.

Reason and Faith

Dr. King writes a quote from William Spurrier's Guide to the Christian Faith.

WBTV Editorial: "King's Bedfellows"

Monday, February 19, 1968

The content of this document suggested that Dr. King break ties with leaders Stokley Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, due to their stance on violence as a weapon. At the bottom of this document, is an invitation for Dr. King, H. Rap Brown and Stokley Carmichael to respond.

Unwise and Untimely?

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

Letter from Peggy Hutter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A white college student writes to Mrs. King, expressing her condolences and shock after the death of Dr. King.

Letter from Ryan & Ebert Law Firm to the SCLC about Will of Carl A. Ryan

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

In this letter to Dr. King and the SCLC, the Executives of the Ryan, Ryan & Ebert Law Firm reward the organization with a check for $960.00 on behalf of the last Will and Testament of Carl A. Ryan

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Joel Goor

Monday, August 17, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Rabbi Joel Goor of Dr. King's absence from the city due to an engagement to speak before the European Baptist Federation. She promises to have Dr. King signed a copy of his book for Goor to keep and appreciates Goor's support to the civil rights movement.

Memo to SCLC Contributors

This memo from the SCLC Staff highlights political activity taking place in Louisville, Kentucky, Blue Ridge, Georgia, and Cleveland, Ohio. The organization had used the energy from demonstrations to fuel voter registration campaigns. They share stories of collaborations and success that have resulted from their efforts.

Correspondence from Maude L. Ballou to Miss Frehse - Apr 29, 1960

Friday, April 29, 1960

Here Maude L. Ballou is responding to Miss Frehse letter concerning questions about MLK's book "Stride Towards Freedom." Miss Ballou states that MLK's time schedule is too full to respond to her questions.

Descartes

Dr. King references a theological concept by the French philosopher Rene Descartes.

Advice for Living

Advice for Living is a column Dr. King uses to help people with moral dilemmas. In this issue, he receives questions from an 18-year old about his mother's drinking issues, a 24-year old with relationship issues, and others.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Louis J. Braun

Tuesday, September 9, 1969

Dr. King agrees to serve on the Advisory Board of Campus Americans for Democratic Action. Dr. King explains that his ability to contribute to the Board will be limited, but he will assist when possible.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Photograph of MLK

Guenther Jacobs from Germany sends Dr. King a photo for him to autograph.

Chicago Schedule

Dr. King lists the flight numbers and times associated with his travel from Atlanta to Chicago.

Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

James H. Halsey Writes MLK About Alumni Solicitation

Friday, March 15, 1963

James H. Halsey writes Dr. King about financial support for the University of Bridgeport and its program.

Letter from Vanessa Garrett to MLK

Friday, February 2, 1968

Vanessa Garrett writes Dr. King discussing various problems African Americans face. She seeks advice on how to solve these issues.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King outlines the two assumptions that one must have while studying the work of Kierkegaard.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Rubio

In this letter, Dr. King attempts to guide Dr. Rubio to resources that will be helpful in his new endeavors.

Mastering Ourselves

"Mastering Ourselves" is Dr. King's exploration of the inner struggle for good and evil that occurs within every human's experience. Dr. King asserts that this "dualism" can sometimes cause good people to do bad things and bad people to do good things. According to Dr. King, this can only be overcome through identifying and replacing one's own weaknesses. He also suggests finding a profitable way to use leisure time coupled with a devotional life and continuous prayer.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

A. Philip Randolph writes Dr. King requesting that he join as a sponsor in the campaign to decrease customers of the two chief banks supporting apartheid in South Africa.

Conscience

Dr. King ponders the meaning of the word 'conscience.' He questions the nature of conscience and ultimately sees it as a necessary sense of obligation that makes a difference in the life of a civilization.