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"Brooklyn, NY"

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Thursday, January 7, 1965
Nebraska (NE), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.

Letter from Sam Garwood Concerning MLK's Involvement with the Vietnam Conflict

Brooklyn, NY

Sam Garwood expresses his opinion on the Vietnam War. It could have a negative effect on the Civil Rights Movement if Dr. King doesn't address the situation in a pleasing way to Americans. He believes that a lot of support gained could be lost due to the War.

Eisenhower - Views on the Racial Question

Dr. King notes General Dwight D. Eisenhower's justification of racial segregation during Eisenhower's 1948 testimony before a Senate subcommittee.

MLK Address at the AFL-CIO Fourth Constitutional Convention

Monday, December 11, 1961

Dr. King delivers a speech at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO to address the lack of equality and rights for laborers and people of color. Dr. King encourages those at the convention to remain steadfast in the fight for social justice in order to overcome the mountain of oppression.

"Negro Leader Looks Down Road Ahead"

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

The Augusta Chronicle wrote this extensive review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this document, the review places special emphasis on Dr. King's views on the War on Poverty, the Black Power Movement and the state of the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram to Governor Carl Sanders

Georgia (GA)

The SCLC writes to Georgia Governor Carl Sanders regarding the murder of Andy Whatley in Americus, GA.

Letter from Lewis Conrad to MLK

Monday, January 14, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Penn Unitarian Fellowship of the University of Pennsylvania extends an invitation to Dr. King to meet with the student body for an informal discussion. The university desires Dr. King to converse with several race relation classes for a more realistic perspective from an active leader in the movement. Due to the growing population of the African American community in Philadelphia, it is the university's hope that Dr. King will address social issues specifically in Philadelphia.

Letter from Unknown to MLK

This letter from an unknown author advises Dr. King to conduct the largest voter registration drive in an effort to elimate poverty. According to the author, "Politicians understand the ballot."

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes about "Social Ethics" as discussed in the second chapter of the Old Testament book, Malachi.

Schleiermacher (The Church)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “The Christian Faith.”

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

The author writes Dr. King and questions his motives for speaking so "rashly" against the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Melvin Brisk to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Melvin Brisk, President of Quadrangle Books, requests that Dr. King read Clarence Darrow's book "Verdicts Out of Court." Brisk acknowledges Dr. King's limited time schedule and urges him to pursue a meeting with Darrow to discuss his publication.

What Is Salvation

Dr. King writes notes regarding several components of salvation.

Letter from Beatrice Schultz to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL

Beatrice Schultz responds to a letter from Dr. King and expresses her appreciation towards him for explaining his stance on "Black Power." She also encloses a contribution to further demonstrate her support of Dr. King.

Draft of Statement to TIME Magazine from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement, Dr. King is pleased to know that the President is calling for new civil rights legislation. Unfortunately, the President did not express anything new nor directly address the issue. Dr. King emphasizes the urgent need for the President to demand vigorous civil rights legislation in order to expedite school integration and the right to vote.

Trinitarianism

Dr. King discusses the doctrine trinitarianism, the belief that God is one being, existing in three equal persons.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Contributors List

This is a list of the organizations that contributed to the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

Making the Best of a Bad Mess

In this sermon, Dr. King discusses the letter Paul sent to Titus while he was in Crete. According to the letter, Crete was a terrible place for Christians, and Titus may have been confused as to why he was left there. Paul wrote to him saying that he left him there to make the situation better for the other people there. That is how one makes the best out of a bad mess.

The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Berkeley, CA

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.

Progress Report from Robert L. Green to SCLC Staff

Tuesday, September 12, 1967
Virginia (VA), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA, California (CA), New York, NY, New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Berkeley, CA

Mr. Green sends this report to the SCLC staff concerning the Chicago Adult Education Project (CAEP). He writes of the problems and difficulties concerning black communities such as Lawndale, Illinois. He then goes on to describe what the major objective is and how the CAEP can help communities, like those in Lawndale. He proposes "to develop basic, needed educational tools to improve reading, writing, consumer and personal budget skills, and to provide the project with job-seeking skills."

Letter from Shirley Katzander to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967
New York, NY

Shirley Katzander, Director of Promotion for "The Reporter," requests Dr. King's commentary on an article written by Meg Greenfield titled "What is Racial Balance in the Schools?"

Letter from Aubrey Brown Jr. to MLK

Monday, June 26, 1967
Virginia (VA), Richmond, VA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Aubrey Brown Jr., Editor of "The Presbyterian Outlook," asks Dr. King to provide a statement regarding the obligations American voters have to choose "officials who have high personal moral standards." The statement will be used in the publication's annual "Going to College" Handbook.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964
New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, suggests a discussion concerning future writing plans. She mentions the possibility of publishing a collection that would include several of Dr. King's speeches and writings, among them the March on Washington address and the Oslo speech.

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Atlanta, GA, New Hampshire (NH), GERMANY

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Earl White

Thursday, October 11, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Reverend Earl White for his participation in and support of the movement in Albany.

God (Evil)

Dr. King quotes Anicius Severinus Manlius Boethius, from "De Consolatione Philosophiae" (Consolation of Philosophy).