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Telegram from Harold Willens to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 10, 1968

Mr. Willens forwards a telegram to Dora McDonald that he had previously sent to Andrew Young. Willens invited Ralph D. Abernathy to be a guest on "Issues and Answers." Abernathy initially declined the invitation only later to accept, which lead Willens to inform him of the potential "impact and consequences."

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Eugene Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addresses multiple issues that were misunderstood. He then encourages Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions and informs him that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Southern Conference Educational Fund Endorsement of MLK Vietnam Stance

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

The Southern Conference Educational Fund issues this article in the Patriot News Service. This statement supports Dr. King's sentiments regarding the Vietnam War and also details issues of race, injustice, and inequality in various places throughout the world.

Kant Critiques Other Philosophers

Dr. King contemplates Immanuel Kant's critique of other philosophers. Kant finds limitations in the ideologies of Hume, Leibniz, and Locke. He believes Hume and Leibniz to fall short on their understandings of knowledge. Kant further reproaches Hume and Locke as ignorant for viewing the senses as a viable explanation of consciousness.

Help For Nigeria

Saturday, March 25, 1967

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Monday, February 24, 1964

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

Letter From Mattie M. Patterson to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Mattie Patterson congratulates Dr. King on the two awards he has recently received.

CIC Press Release: Hilliard to Head Catholic Testimonial for MLK

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

The Catholic Interracial Council releases a statement announcing Raymond M. Hilliard as the Chairman of the 1964 John F. Kennedy Award Dinner. During the event, Dr. King will be honored for his leadership and dedication to the civil rights struggle. Hilliard, whom President Johnson named to the National Citizens Committee for Community Relations to advise on the implementation of civil rights legislation, called Dr. King's work "inspired and truly Christian" and said that the CIC was honored to celebrate him.

Letter from James Allen to MLK

Wednesday, April 6, 1966

James Allen expresses his opinion of the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

The National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower informs Dr. King of the tremendous strides made by the African American community during the elections in Sunflower County, Mississippi. Four years prior, the loss of elections by black candidates was attributed to local intimidation, but new organizational tactics provided the group with tools to combat this issue. The success of the election set a precedent for many other Mississippi counties to view voting rights as a means to change citizens' lives and the nature of the state.

Letter from Illinois High School Student Beth Allen to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

High school student Beth Allen writes Dr. King inquiring about how she can contribute to the Civil Rights Movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from MLK to Transportation Workers Union President Matthew Guinan

Tuesday, March 8, 1966

Dr. King thanks newly elected Transport Workers Union President Matthew Guinan for his contribution that will aid SCLC in their efforts. However, the contribution was made out to Dr. King, which causes him to inform Mr. Guinan to make the check payable to the SCLC. Dr. King congratulates Guinan on his recent position and wishes him much success.

Tritheism

Dr. King notes the definition of tritheism.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

Monday, December 11, 1961

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Letter to MLK Regarding Nobel Peace Prize Nominations

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

The writer informs Dr. King of Dean Gunnar Helander's campaign to have L. John Collins nominated for the 1968 Nobel Peace Prize. He requests that Dr. King nominate Collins for this prestigious award.

Telegram from Dr. Roland Smith to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Dr. Roland Smith congratulates Dr. King on being honored with a Doctor of Divinity Degree from Morehouse College.

MLK Requests Contributions

Monday, April 1, 1968

Dr. King writes this fundraising letter on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He explains the campaigns taking place in Washington for the poor and urges immediate financial support for the struggle.

Letter from D. E. Goorman to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968

D. E. Goorman advises Dr. King on how to promote peace, freedom and economic security for all US citizens. He suggests "appealing to the moral conscience" of the majority while implementing an economic action plan.

MLK Responds to Questions Pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement

Dr. King responds to a series of questions concerning such topics as his opposition to the Vietnam War, the direction of the Civil Rights Movement, urban riots in Detroit and Newark, and SCLC initiatives catered to the ghettos of the American South.

Letter From Philip S. Riggs to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, Philip Riggs writes to express his difference of opinion with Dr. King regarding the treatment of House Representative Adam Clayton Powell.

The Citizenship Education Program

This newsletter serves as a platform for the Citizenship Education Program. The program is designed to help inform African Americans of their rights as citizens in the United States.

Letter from MLK to George E. Bass

Thursday, April 7, 1966

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the Annual Luncheon for the Planned Parenthood Association.

Letter from Norman Thomas to the New York Times Editor

Monday, August 28, 1967

Norman Thomas cites an excerpt from a story by Peter Khiss entitled "Rowan Terms Dr. King's Stand on War a Peril to Rights Gains." Mr. Thomas asserts that the statement is incorrect and that he whole "heartily" applauds Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Our God is Able

In this chapter from "Strength to Love,"Dr. King proclaims that God is able to do anything. He asserts that while man's intellect and natural disasters may cause us to question God, He is omnipotent.

Letter from Barbara Austin to SCLC

Monday, June 26, 1967

Mrs. Austin writes the SCLC concerning Dr. King's views on Vietnam. She encloses a contribution to the organization because of Dr. King's courage to speak out against the war.

Letter from Erik Ruden to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1968

Upon learning of Dr. King's speaking engagement at the upcoming World Council meeting in Uppsala, Sweden, Ruden invites him to an additional meeting at luncheon or area Baptist Church.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gambbacinni

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Gambaccini's request to the Pope for peace regarding the Vietnam War. Dr. King adds, "As the strength of our world's weapons increases and the war in Vietnam continues to escalate the crying need for world peace becomes greater and greater."