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St. Augustine, Florida: 400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

St. Augustine, FL, Jacksonville, FL, Massachusetts (MA), Connecticut (CT), Florida (FL)

The SCLC compiled and published this pamphlet about St. Augustine, Florida, describing a long history of racial discrimination and segregation supported by Northern tourism.

Publicity Plans for Pilgrimage Tour

New York (NY)

This document describes a request for Dr. King to become involved with the Pilgrimage Tour in New York.

Letter from K. Emmons to MLK

Michigan (MI), VIETNAM

K. Emmons proposes to Dr. King that Christians should put God and Jesus above "fumbling politicians." K. Emmons also comments on soldiers in Vietnam.

Chicago Nonviolent Action Proposal

Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Indiana (IN), Louisville, KY, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Kentucky (KY), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

SCLC's proposal for a nonviolent action campaign in Chicago identifies the city as the prototype for the northern urban race problem. The proposal includes a snapshot of the situation in Chicago, past approaches, SCLC?s philosophy of social change, a description of twelve different aspects of the problem of economic exploitation, and a plan and timetable for mobilizing forces. Objectives are stated for the federal, state, and local levels. SCLC proposes to work in collaboration with the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations.

Biography of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr

Stockbridge, GA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This document presents a biographical sketch of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

The Trinity

Dr. King provides the historical origin and ideology of the Trinity.

Dr. King's Response to Mrs. W. Bascom

Friday, October 17, 1958
Montgomery, AL

In this letter, Dr. King responded to the get well correspondence sent by Mrs. Willie Bascom. Dr. King took the opportunity to thank her for the kind donation sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He also acknowledged his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

The Black Revolution

California (CA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), BRAZIL, Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This pamphlet produced by the SCLC is an excerpt from Thomas Merton's "The Black Revolution: Letters to a White Liberal." Merton seeks to awaken the conscience of white America by presenting the Negro perspective in the struggle for civil rights. He discusses how Dr. King utilizes the philosophy of nonviolence as a tool of progress and the contrasting reaction of Negros based upon their religious association as either Christian or Muslim. The concluding message is a call for the complete reform of America's social system which permits and breeds injustice.

Give Decency A Chance in the South...

Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), North Carolina (NC), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Kentucky (KY), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Arkansas (AR), Texas (TX), Oklahoma (OK), Tennessee (TN), Maryland (MD), Florida (FL), West Virginia (WV), Delaware (DE)

The Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) is working toward eliminating "all forms of racial segregation in the Southern and border States." This brochure highlights SCEF's accomplishments, supporters, programs and future.

Telegram from Ambassador Ade Martins to MLK

NIGERIA

This telegram was sent to Dr. King and Theodore Brown by N. Ade Martins, the Ambassador of Nigeria. He explains the reaction of Lt. Col. Yakubu Gowon, the commander in chief of the armed forces, to Dr. King's letter concerning the violence in Nigeria.

Anaximander

GREECE

Dr. King documents background information on Greek philosopher Anaximander. Over five note cards, he outlines key principles of Anaximander's philosophy under the subject titles "Metaphysics" and "His Views on Biology."

Letter from Govenor Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, September 5, 1962
New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller encloses a copy of "The Future of Federalism." His book "traces the development of the federal idea in the United States."

Letter from Ed Clayton to Martin Gal

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Michigan (MI), Birmingham, AL

Ed Clayton, Public Relations Director for SCLC, writes Martin Gal, Producer of WMSB TV, to inform him that Dr. King will not be able to make an appearance on his television production because of his focus on the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Roger Boone

Tuesday, August 31, 1965
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King thanks Roger Boone for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He emphasizes the importance of contributions like Boone's to the SCLC's ability to continue its work.

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967
Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, THAILAND

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Housing Report to the SCLC Board of Directors

Chicago, IL, New York, NY

Members of the SCLC Board of Directors were the recipients of this detailed report outlining solutions to end the slum crisis in the North.

Letter of Support to MLK

Tuesday, January 18, 1966
Indiana (IN)

Alphia Ganaway and Katherine Oakley send a check as a token of appreciation following Dr. King's appearance in South Bend, Indiana three years earlier. A member of the NAACP and other civic organizations, Ganaway led the effort that brought Dr. King to South Bend on October 18th, 1963.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

Invitation to 101st Founders' Day of Morehouse College

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Joseph Draper, a former classmate, invites Dr. King to the 101st Founders' Day Inauguration activities at Morehouse College. Draper hopes for Dr. King's attendance, as he feels this will give support to newly instated President Gloster.

Letter from Mrs. Ross D. Davis to MLK

Monday, February 14, 1966
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Davis invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker for the Women's National Democratic Club.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

Saturday, May 6, 1967
VIETNAM, ISRAEL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., EGYPT, GERMANY, UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE, CUBA

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from Jerome Miller to Andrew Young

Monday, January 23, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, PUERTO RICO, Kentucky (KY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Jerome Miller, a field representative for Encampment for Citizenship, writes to Andrew Young requesting a meeting and soliciting direction for selecting students to attend an upcoming event.

"Leaders of 'Socialist Scholars' Talk Guerrilla War in Cities Next Year"

Saturday, December 30, 1967
New York (NY)

Alice Widener argues that the Black Power movement will result in domestic guerilla warfare. The writer's stance originates from a Black Power workshop she attended. Widener argues that the U.S. government must "round up and imprison" the "Red-Black power criminals."

Hegel's Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on Hegel's social ethics. He quotes, "The principle triad here consist of law in the sense of abstract right, morality, and social ethics." According to Hegel, abstract right may be defined as being a person and respecting other people, while morality refers to one's conscience and social ethics regards another triad, being family, civil society, and the state.

Letter from Ms. McDonald to Ms. Elinor G. Galusha

Thursday, October 27, 1966
Boston, MA

In this letter dated October 28, 1966, Ms. McDonald tells Ms. Galusha that she may use an excerpt from Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from Freddye Henderson of Henderson Travel to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Stockholm, Sweden, London, England, FRANCE, DENMARK, Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

Freddye Henderson encloses information regarding flight schedules, rates for transportation, and suggested hotels for Dr. King's trip to Oslo, Norway.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Sidney Anger

Monday, March 25, 1968
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Sidney Anger for his contribution of $100 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King continues to share the current work of the organization and the importance of financial support in order to ensure sustainability.

Letter of Commitment to Reverend Jesse Jackson from John Wooten

Friday, February 10, 1967
Chicago, IL

John Wooton expresses the commitment of the Negro Industrial Economic Union towards the efforts of Reverend Jesse Jackson and SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

The New Leader: MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, April 16, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, GERMANY, Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA

The New Leader, a New York-based biweekly magazine, published Dr. King?s Letter from Birmingham City Jail. This historic piece is a response to the views of some fellow clergymen that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely.? King's critics had branded him an "outside agitator" and an extremist who should not be advocating lawbreaking. Dr. King responds with this letter and references prominent historical figures to counter these criticisms.