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Chicago Freedom Fund Festival

Chicago, IL, Little Rock, AR, Nashville, TN, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), New Jersey (NJ), Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA

The Chicago Freedom Fund Festival, organized by Mahalia Jackson, served as a benefit for the SCLC.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah demonstrating God's wrath.

Letter from MLK to Michelle Feinberg

Wednesday, February 13, 1963
Indiana (IN)

Dr. King responds to Michelle Feinberg, a special education student from Gary, Indiana. In the letter, Dr. King tells Michelle her letter meant a lot to him and she is fortunate to have a special teacher.

Immortality

In this series of note cards, Dr. King interprets Ecclesiastes 3:18-19 as "a clear explicit rejection of immortality."

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961
INDIA, Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Presentation of the Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights

JAMAICA

Dr. King was a recipient of the first Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights. This award was issued by the Jamaican Government and was presented to Coretta Scott King due to the tragic death of Dr. King earlier in the year. This program outlines that event.

Letter from S.W. McAllister to MLK

New York (NY), Norfolk, VA, Georgia (GA)

Mr. McAllister, a father of three, requests Dr. King's assistance in obtaining a divorce from his wife who is living with another man. Dr. King was an image of hope for many people and often received requests for help in areas unrelated to civil rights.

Methodology (Wieman)

Dr. King outlines the methodology of religious philosopher Henry Wieman.

Letter from J. T. Brooks to Dr. and Mrs. MLK

Monday, November 16, 1953
Montgomery, AL, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL), Massachusetts (MA), North Carolina (NC)

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church representative J. T. Brooks conveys the church's interest in considering Dr. King for the pastorate.

Latitudinarianism

Dr. King defines latitudinarianism, a term "applied to a liberal opinion which allows the diversity of opinion."

Anonymous Letter from Jail - Birmingham, AL

Birmingham, AL

In this letter an anonymous writer shares his gratitude for all the support extended as Dr. King and his colleagues were incarcerated at a jail in Birmingham, AL.

Memorandum from William A. Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette to SCLC Staff Members

Thursday, January 4, 1968
Atlanta, GA

William Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette inform the SCLC staff members of an impromptu retreat on the Poor People's Campaign, which will be held at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966
London, England, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

Letter from T. W. Cole Sr. to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963
Texas (TX)

The General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity sends Dr. King a contribution to aid the SCLC in the quest for "human dignity." Dr. King was inducted into Alpha Phi Alpha at Boston University in 1952.

Note card-Dr.King

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbet Spencer's views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Aquinas, Thomas

Dr. King notes biographical information about Thomas Aquinas.

Telegram from Clarance L Carroll to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mr. Carroll sends a congratulatory telegram to Dr. King. He also requests future correspondence.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration Reception

Washington, D.C.

The Distinguished Hospitality Committee of the Inaugural Committee invite Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a reception preceding the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Walter Ducey

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Chicago, IL, St. Augustine, FL

Dora McDonald informs Walter Ducey that Dr. King is out of town at the moment and grants him permission to include Dr. King's photograph and remarks in the publication he is producing.

Handwritten Notes on Sacramentalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sacramentalism. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from Mrs. Clara Bayles to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Iowa (IA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Missouri (MO), Des Moines, IA

Mrs. Bayles of Des Moines, Iowa writes Dr. King during his sentence in the Birmingham jail. She congratulates him for all of his achievements and reminisces on the events she has been privileged to attend and hear him speak publicly.

Letter from Robert W. Fischer to MLK

Monday, January 27, 1964
Washington, D.C., ITALY

Robert Fischer is a collector of autographed TIME magazine covers that feature famous personalities. He requests the cover with Dr. King's portrait, so that he may add it to his growing collection.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Lyndon B. Johnson invites Dr. King to a conference to hear a progress report on the work of the President's Committee for Equal Employment.

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Berkeley, CA, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

Letter from Jim Robert Davis to MLK

Chicago, IL

Jim Robert Davis tells Dr. King how his presence in Chicago's Lawndale community have caused many of his fellow neighbors to clean their neighborhood. He pens a small but inspriational poem under the subject "The Glory of Blackmen."

Excerpts from Remarks of The Vice President

Saturday, May 28, 1955
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Vice President Richard M. Nixon speaks about the Eisenhower Administration’s support of Negroes in the fight to remove discrimination in employment.

Advertisement for Ku Klux Klan Segregation Meeting

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This advertisement invites every white person who supports segregation to attend an upcoming meeting sponsored by the Ku Klux Klan.

Letter from Irving Frank to MLK

New York (NY)

Irving Frank urges Dr. King to continue speaking out against the Vietnam War. Frank also encloses a check in support of Dr. King.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gay to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963
Detroit, MI

Britt and Hagel Gay write Dr. King enclosing a contribution to help him in his "wonderful work."

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, GHANA, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, TANZANIA, NIGERIA, ANGOLA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, INDIA, Georgia (GA)

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.