Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"CANADA"

The Emergency Civil Liberties Committee Defends the Constitutional Rights

Friday, February 16, 1968

ECLC writes to ask for assistance with their efforts to criminalize governmental draft tactics. As staunch supporters of the Bill of Rights and the Constitution, ECLC argues that the Draft is a violation of citizen's constitutional rights. Furthermore, they have dedicated their services to protecting the rights of youth, arguing that the draft is economically discriminatory in "student deferments". The organization challenges other civil liberties organizations to join them in this fight.

Speaking Out

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Thursday, June 18, 1959

Vice President Richard M. Nixon expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's participation at the recent Religious Leaders Conference on Equal Job Opportunity. Nixon emphasizes the need for ongoing collaboration between local and national leaders to advance critical policy initiatives.

Letter from James P. Dixon of Antioch College to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

James P. Dixon, President of Antioch College, thanks Dr. King for accepting an invitation to speak at the school's commencement ceremony.

Letter from Phyllis Kaplan to Readers

Academic Media sends out a questionnaire to gather important data regarding financial aid programs.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Letter from MLK to Gaylord Nelson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Gaylord Nelson, a United States Senator from Wisconsin, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Appreciation Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

In this letter, Maurice Dawkins expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's statement that encouraged the Congress to support the war on poverty. He also expresses appreciation for Dr. King making the urgency of this matter clear to the world.

Letter from MLK to Prisoner James C. Guyton

Wednesday, January 24, 1962

Dr. King sends his prayers to Mr. Guyton in his confinement and informs him that he will contact him when he has additional information.

I Have A Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Dr. King delivered the "I Have A Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. Along with Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," it is considered to be one of the greatest speeches of all time.

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King examines the contradictions in human nature in this handwritten draft of a sermon.

Letter from E. H. Singmaster to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

E.H. Singmaster informs Dr. King that they should "hang together" and not separate in war and peace. He advocates that those involved in the military are "improved," regardless of color or gender.

Letter from Guy Heinemann to MLK

Wednesday, June 12, 1963

Guy Heinemann states that several copies of the Civil Rights issue of the Yale Political have been sent to Dr. King.

Letter from Women's Society of Tremont Baptist Church to MLK

Wednesday, May 26, 1965

The Women's Society of Tremont Baptist Church informs Dr. King that the money raised during their Women's Day will be forwarded to assist with his work in the South.

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. and Mrs. Peretz

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Andrew Young thanks Dr. and Mrs. Peretz for their hospitality during a recent concert. He also explains that the concert, which had been designed as a fundraiser for the SCLC, did not meet financial projections.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Eugene Sands

Thursday, July 30, 1964

Dr. King writes Mrs. Eugene Sands to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from the N.H.W.P.A to Dr. King

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing his dislike of African Americans.

Crisis of Culture

Dr. King refers to his note card on "morality" and cites an example of the crisis of culture.

Articles Regarding Strides Made in the Civil Rights Movement

This SCLC news bulletin published around 1964, discloses information regarding Dr. King and others staying in the Birmingham jail. Also included are updates on the progress of the Civil Rights Movement in various cities, additions and changes within the SCLC and relationships with familiar and notable personalities.

Letter from Byron F. Mische to the Members of Congress Regarding Vietnam

Monday, March 20, 1967

In this letter to the members of Congress, Byron E. Mische took the initiative to combine letters sent to government officials, editors of publications and congressmen regarding Vietnam. This letter was copied to Dr. King.

Letter from Harold Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 14, 1964

Tacoma, Washington native Harold Bass sends a contribution to aid in the work of the Civil Rights Movement. Bass, pastor of his own independent church, also forwards Dr. King a copy of their newsletter that promotes peace efforts all over the country.

What Is Salvation

Dr. King writes notes regarding several components of salvation.

Dr. King-Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brown's views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Thursday, December 27, 1962

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

Letter from MLK to Miss Ethel Klemm

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King takes time to write Miss Ethel Klemm and explain the reasons for the purpose of the Freedom Movement. He clears up the misconception that Negroes are just hastily trying to get their way by stating that Negroes have been patient for too long. According to Dr. King, "This is not a matter of gradualism in its most commonly accepted term, but it is a matter of morality."

Letter from Tommie Crockett to MLK

Tommie Crockett expresses his appreciation for the work of Dr. King. He explains that black people are getting tired of the nonviolence method and are beginning to embrace the term, "Black Power." He explains that blacks will no longer participate in peaceful civil rights demonstrations because, "we already done that."

Letter from James Gilliam to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1961

Mr. Gilliam sends Dr. King financial support in the amount of fifty dollars.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Chicago, Illinois

Tuesday, April 30, 1957

This document contains the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon at the Joint Defense Appeal of the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. He expresses what can be done and what laws should be passed to make sure others are not further abused.

MLK Endorses Septima Clark's Autobiography

Monday, July 2, 1962

King writes this endorsement of Septima Clark's autobiography"Echo In My Soul," which captured her struggle as a Negro woman in the South. Clark was a prominent civil rights activist considered to be the "Grandmother of the American Civil Rights Movement."

Housing Plan at Gadsden Is Upheld

Thursday, October 11, 1962

The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals rules against Negroes in Gadsden, Alabama who wanted to stop urban redevelopment plan which would segregate the Negroes.