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Letter from Thomas Price to MLK

Thursday, October 8, 1964

Major Thomas Price, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance in retaining his commission and active duty service with the United States Army.

Letter from Labor Union President Michael Quill to MLK

Friday, November 30, 1962

Michael Quill, International President of the Transport Workers Union of America, encloses a copy of their 11th Constitutional Convention minutes to Dr. King. He also thanks him for his words at their convention and his contribution to the labor movement in America.

Letter Regarding the Distribution of Pilgrimage Folders

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Sandy F. Ray thanks Andrew Young for speaking to his parishioners. Reverend Ray also requests information regarding the distribution of the Pilgrimage Folders, in preparation for the mass pilgrimage Dr. King was planning to lead to Israel and Jordan.

Letter from Martha Williams to MLK

Wednesday, March 31, 1965

Martha Williams, who serves as the Acting Secretary of "The Zippers," a Chicago-based social and charity club, forwards a donation to the SCLC. She discusses the recent march from Selma to Montgomery when Alabama guardsmen respectfully removed their helmets during a prayer at the culminating rally. Williams extends a special prayer of protection for Dr. King and civil rights workers.

SCLC Report of the Director

This document contains a six month SCLC Semi-Annual Report. The SCLC reports on their accomplishments in the areas of social action, fundraising, education, legal defense, etc. This document discusses the Virginia Christian Leadership Conference, the SCLC Leadership Training Program, and the Citizens Voter Registration Drive. Also included is a list of recommendations for the SCLC staff.

Letter from MLK to Fredrik Schjander

Wednesday, October 6, 1965

Dr. King responds to a survey of five questions from Fredrik Schjander regarding the world's chances for peace. Dr. King believes the prospects for world peace have actually declined since he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, due to conflicts in areas such as Kashmir and Vietnam. Dr. King does write that the growing role of the United Nations as a global mediator is an encouraging sign.

We're Ready to Guzzle It, But We Ain't Ready to Make It!

George S. Schuyler uses his weekly "Views and Reviews" column to voice his opinions about the lack of economic initiative in the Negro community.

Washington D. C. Star: Negro Lawyer Pushing Town Incorporation Plan

Thursday, October 5, 1967

Congressman John Conyers shares an article with civil rights attorney, Orzell Billingsley. The article highlights Attorney Billingsley's efforts to join 20 predominately black municipalities, so that more African Americans can have a voice within politics and economic development.

Telegram to Mrs. J. Tower from John Howard Griffen

Thursday, June 11, 1964

This telegram documents Griffen's commentary on one of Dr. King's publications.

Letter from MLK to Melvin Grussing Regarding a Contribution

Monday, February 26, 1968

Dr. King writes to express gratitude for the generous contribution of $126 to the SCLC. He conveys that such support enables SCLC to continue programs to complete the task of voter registration in the South.

Letter from MLK to E. Weidner

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King informs Mrs. E. Weidner that Negroes have enjoyed positions of respect and prestige in non-Negro nations. He cites several examples in history to this statement.

Letter from Anne Farnsworth to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Anne Farnsworth acknowledges the kind letters Dr. King sends thanking her for the past financial contributions she has made to the movement. She further encloses a check in honor of the four little girls killed in the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham and the assassination of President Kennedy.

Tests of Great Music

Dr. King lists five criteria to use to evaluate whether a piece of music is great. Great music should hold its appeal over time, connect different experiences, foster a deeper life experience, unify history and integrate the individual personality.

God

Dr. King explores the topic of God and quotes the classical scholar Gilbert Murray.

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

Statement by Albert A. Raby

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Albert A. Raby releases a statement denouncing the Illinois State Senate for rejecting an equal housing bill. Mr. Raby calls for a tent-in and rally at the construction site for the proposed Weston plant. Raby cites Illinois is in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and that federal funding for the Weston Project be terminated.

Letter from Congressman Paul H. Todd to MLK

Monday, October 11, 1965

Florida Democratic Congressman Paul Todd explains to Dr. King why he voted against seating five congressman of the Mississippi Freedonm Democratic Party. Todd based his decision on an earlier precedent, which dismissed a previous claim "because it was brought by a party not legally a candidate for the contested seat."

Letter from MLK to Frank Church

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Frank Church, a United States Senator from Idaho, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty: Policies and Programs

Tuesday, October 13, 1964

This booklet outlining the priorities, policies, and programs of the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Monday, June 19, 1967

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

Letter from Jeanne Whitaker to MLK

Jeanne Whitaker does not oppose the slogan "Black Power", however she identifies the distinction between power and violence. Mrs. Whitaker elaborates on the influence of non-violence that was rooted from Mahatma Gandhi's methodology and practice.

Customer's Reciept from MLK to Morehouse College

This document is a customer's receipt from Dr. Martin L. King Jr. to Morehouse College.

Letter from James E. Baine to MLK about Commentary

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

In this letter James Baine asks Dr. King about segregation and integrated for reference to be used in a college class.

Don B. Pratt's Position Statement

Friday, January 26, 1968

Don Pratt expresses concerns about his induction into the US Army during the Vietnam War. Mr. Pratt questions the morality of this "aggressive" war, which would enable him to inflict violence against his "neighbors" of Vietnam.

What Is a Cause

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Principles of Natural Knowledge."

Letter from Catherine Enge to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Catherine Enge, on behalf of the Bergens Kristenruss, asks Dr. King to write a newspaper article that will be distributed to approximately 12,000 Norwegians.

Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The "Chicago Tribune" reviews Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

Telegram from Jack Paley to MLK

Jack Paley informs Dr. King that he has the support of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union as Dr. King works "to win decent treatment for Negroes in public facilities of Atlanta."

Telegram from A. J. Gervantes to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Mayor Cervantes of St. Louis, invites Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is."