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Letter from Dora McDonald to T. M. Benson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Dr. King's secretary responds to a request from Peak Publications to use a portion of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract. Ms. Dora explains to the company's representative that the letter will be published in an upcoming book, hence Dr. King has made a commitment to the publisher to refuse permission for reprints.

New Harassment: The Lunacy Test by MLK

Saturday, June 23, 1962

Dr. King identifies events that demonstrate the absurd actions of the racist opposition during the Freedom Movement in the South.

Letter from Mrs. R. E. Rufenacht to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Mrs. Rufenacht thanks Dr. King for his support of white workers who requested his help. She also encloses a contribution for the work of the SCLC.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about Speaking Out Article

Friday, September 11, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, communicates with Mr. Hunt of Speaking Out regarding payment and schedule of a feature article to be written by Dr. King.

Conference on Social Statistics Resolutions

This document lists a number of solutions for improving the acknowledgement of minorities in America. These solutions were drafted during the Conference on Social Statistics held in Washington D.C.

Letter from MLK to Donald Lincoln Cook

Monday, February 7, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Cook for letter, in which Cook stated his support of Dr. King's stance against the United States military's involvement in Vietnam.

Telegram from Milton Powell to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960

Upon Dr. King's recent arrest, Milton Powell, the executive chairman of CORE, sends his whole-hearted support on behalf of the organization.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Note Card on Revelation

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines the meaning of revelations. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, and bible verses.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. William H. Gray, Jr.

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Dora McDonald responds, on behalf of Dr. King, to Dr. William H. Gray, Jr. letter of April 20, 1966 regarding an invitation to speak at the Baptist Ministers Conference.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Green

Monday, January 22, 1968

In this letter, Ms. Dora McDonald tells Dr. Robert Green that Dr. King has approved Dr. Green's forward for the "Famous American Series."

Letter from Jeremiah Rome to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

Mr. Rome writes to Dr. King to state that African-Americans need good white people, to create job opportunities for the black race.

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

Saturday, August 1, 1964

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Letter from MLK to Sharon Brealer

Tuesday, July 27, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Sharon Brealer for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Prisoner James C. Guyton

Wednesday, January 24, 1962

Dr. King sends his prayers to Mr. Guyton in his confinement and informs him that he will contact him when he has additional information.

Letter from Robert J. McCraken to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

Reverend McCracken extends an invitation to Dr. King to preach at The Riverside Church in New York.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Suggestions for Survival During Period of Prolonged Civil Disorder

This document contains a list of tips and suggested supplies for survival during a period of civil disorder, including specific food items and tools. The document recommends stockpiling enough supplies to survive for at least one month without needing to leave your home.

Letter to MLK from N.P. Feinsinger

Friday, April 28, 1967

In this letter, Feinsinger is consulting Dr. King about the Russell Bull Scholarship and hoping that he can proceed with the selection process.

MLK Addresses Riots and War

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Dr. King encourages friends to support nonviolence in order to avoid physical or moral destruction. He explains that the, "SCLC cannot support riots for moral and pragmatic reasons."

Letter from Abe Feinglass to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964

Abe Feinglass, International Vice-President of Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, requests that Dr. King review and comment on the organization's pamphlets.

Five Denominations of Protestants Said To Ignore Negroes

This article discusses a claim brought against "five influential Protestant denominations" by members of the Rockefeller Fund for Theological Education. Specifically referenced is Rev. Dr. C. Shelby Rooks, Executive secretary of the fund, who is reported as saying that the American Baptist Convention, the Episcopal, the Methodist, the United Presbyterian Churches, and the United Church of Christ discriminated against African Americans "from the centers of denominational power and decision making." Dr.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Friday, July 1, 1966

This program outlines the prevalent social and economic disadvantages of the Negro population of Chicago. The authors give detailed accounts on the presence of impoverished areas and ghettos that systematically oppress African American opportunities for education, housing, and employment. In the past, Negroes have begged, pleaded, and reasoned with white city officials to change community conditions.

Letter from Arthur Spence to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Spence writes Dr. King defending the critical perceptions that some whites hold of blacks. As an African American, Spence feels that some members of his race have developed bad habits.

Is Dialogue Alien to Marxism?" (Polemics)

Czech philosopher Julius Tomin discusses the role of dialogue within Marxist discourse. Critiquing the position set forth by Milan Machovec in his text "Sense of Life," Tomin outlines the the definition of dialogue, the climate necessary for a dialogue to occur, and the role of dialogue in the humanization of men.

Exodus

Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Biblical book of Exodus. Highlighted topics include knowledge, ethics, the doctrine of God, and sin.

Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change: Reformation for Freedom

Friday, May 31, 1957

This 1957 program with the theme "Dignity with Humility, Love with Courage and Justice without Violence" details an event of the Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change, in which Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker. Though his affiliation is listed as President of Montgomery's Improvement Association, Dr. King appeared as leader of the nascent Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed January 10, 1957.

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

Telegram from George M. Houser to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966

In this telegram, dated April 12, 1966, Mr. Houser requests Dr. King's help in leading a march on First National Bank of New York. Due to bank loans to South Africa, several hundred students are showing support by withdrawing their accounts.