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"CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC"

Letter from Representative Thomas G. Morris to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

New Mexico Congressman Thomas Morris writes Dr. King to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram requesting Morris' opposition to House Bill 585, which would dismiss five recently elected members. Morris does not indicate his position in the matter.

Letter from Ted Mercer Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Mr. Mercer requests materials to promote Dr. King's candidacy in the "Choice '68" mock election program on the Bryan College campus. He also relays an invitation from the student body vice president asking Dr. King to speak on campus.

Letter from Harper & Row, Publishers Regarding Royalties

Friday, October 2, 1964

Harper & Row Publishers write to inform the recipient that they deducted money from an enclosed royalty check due to an outstanding balance for books purchased.

Letter from Frank H. Epp to MLK

Monday, November 15, 1965

On behalf of the Canadian Board of Christian Service, Frank H. Epp writes Dr. King inviting him to a series of scheduled discussions in Winnipeg in January of 1966.

Job and Suffering

Dr. King writes on the biblical figure Job and his view of suffering.

Science and Religion

Dr. King documents a quote regarding science and religion from "The Finding of God."

Notre Dame Law School Library Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

Miss Boller, the law school library assistant of Notre Dame, inquires about a recent speech by Dr. King concerning his perspective on the United States and violence.

War

Dr. King cites a quote concerning "war" from Oswald Spengler's "The Return of the Caesars," an article featured in The American Mercury.

Letter to MLK from Irving Zipin

Friday, June 9, 1967

Mr. Zipin writes to offer his support for Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Debbie Steiner to MLK

Sunday, May 17, 1964

Debbie Steiner of Willburn, New Jersey tells Dr. King how she was moved by his article in Life magazine, which she calls "a realistic summary of why the Negro can not wait." She explains her discontent with prejudice and inquires about how young people can influence change.

The Danger of Misguided Goodness

Under the title, "The Danger of Misguided Goodness," the central message in these sermon notes is the need for all individuals to be morally conscientious.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from Rayphil Clark to MLK

Wednesday, September 29, 1965

Michigan inmate Rayphil Clark urges Dr. King to assist him with receiving fair treatment during his incarceration. Clark lists multiple situations where Negro employees and inmates are intimidated by white prison officials. Most importantly, Clark feels that he is constantly being singled out and subjected to horrible treatment. According to Clark's description of prison officials, "they are more concerned with racial vengenaude then they are re-habiliation."

Refinement By Fire

This brochure provides an overview of the SCLC Citizenship Education Program held at the Dorchester Community Center in Georgia.

Letter from Autieve Smith of Revelation Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, August 25, 1964

Autieve Smith writes on behalf of Revelation Baptist Church to express their happiness in Dr. King's acceptance in being a part of their program with the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights Choir. Smith informs Dr. King of the time and place of his address and asks that he provide the committee with the needed information to plan his accommodations.

Letter from MLK to Dr. M. R. Cherry

Tuesday, September 27, 1966

Dr. King informs Dr. M. R. Cherry that he will be unable to accept his invitation to speak at Acadia University in Nova Scotia. King states that his schedule is busy as he is trying to spread social justice in America.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Stride Toward Freedom"

This statement from Victor Gollancz, Ltd. details royalty earnings for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom",for the six-month period ending 9/29/66.

Letter from Thelma Larkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

Miss Larkin, a disgruntled landlord, expresses her concern for Dr. King's initiative against slum lords. She feels his war on slum lords is a bit misguided in that it takes responsibility and accountability away from those she calls slum tenants.

MLK's Recommendation Letter for Alan Wachtel

This original letter was handwritten and initialed by Dr. King for Alan Wachtel, who he was recommending for law school.

Letter from MLK to Ruby Brown

Monday, April 4, 1966

Dr. King writes Ruby Brown of Detroit, Michigan to thank her for her letter regarding the civil rights struggle.

CORE List of 33 Lunch Counters With Unchanged Policies

Monday, February 20, 1961

This document is a CORE list of cities where lunch counter demonstrations have been ineffective.

Southern Rural Action Project

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty announces the initiation of its Southern Rural Action Project. The Southern Rural Action Project coordinates local support groups in the areas of housing, voter registration and other issues in the fight against poverty.

Invitation to MLK from Randolph Carter

Wednesday, February 3, 1064

Randolph Carter invites Dr. King to be the featured leader in a Conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Letter from Glen Nixon to SCLC

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

Glen Nixon offers to participate in the SCLC's Chicago project in order to gain a better understanding of Northern slums. Nixon asks to be referred to other programs and organizations, if his assistance is not needed in Chicago.

Paul Tillich

Dr. King references the theologian, Paul Tillich, by asserting, "If philosophy of religion does not consider the revelation claim of religion, it misses its object and doesn't deal with real religion."

God

Dr. King cites a scripture that derives from the Old Testament biblical book of Deuteronomy, stating "the seeing of God's face meant death."

Letter from MLK to J. Howard Edmondson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Oklahoma Senator James Howard Edmondson to express appreciation for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Francis Drake to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

Francis Drake sends Dr. King a donation to the SCLC collected on behalf of the Drake Family as a Thanksgiving gift. Drake and his wife are ministers with the United Church of Christ in Massachusetts and support Dr. King's fight for freedom and justice.

Wilkins Praises Darien Teacher Exchange Setup

Friday, December 11, 1964

Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, applauds Darien's efforts to integrate minority and suburban communities through its exchange program with New York City. The program "sought Negro teachers, business and professional people to live and work in their community."

MLK Speech Outline

This document contains a preliminary speech outline by Dr. King. The topic of the talk is "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness," and in it Dr. King maintains that, "We must continue to courageously challenge the system of segregation."