Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC"

Marcian

Dr. King highlights biographical information on Marcian, a second-century reformer.

Walk for Freedom

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

In this article, Dr. King address the issue of racism occurring in Montgomery. It was here that African Americans, including Dr. King, were victims to humiliation and violent acts because of their race. Dr. King further promote nonviolent protest to combat this civil injustice.

Letter from Carolyn Fewell to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Mrs. Fewell, secretarial assistant to the dean of the Wesley Theological Seminary, thanks Dr. King for his sending his book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from the Interpreters' House to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Carlyle Marney and J. C. Herrin invite Dr. King to attend a conference to discuss the future mission and tasks for American Baptists in the South.

Transubstantiation

Dr. King defines 'transubstantiation', a concept derived from Roman Catholic theology.

Letter from Mrs. R.B. Hassell to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, New York (NY), Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, New York, NY, VIETNAM

Writing from Memphis, Tennessee, Mrs. Hassell expresses her love for America and her concern regarding the cruel treatment many have experienced throughout the world. She offers encouragement to Dr. King and other preachers who are advocates for peace.

NYT Advertisement for Where Do We Go from Here?

New York, NY

This document is a New York Times advertisement for Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The title of the ad offers the synopsis: "Martin Luther King, Jr. offers a hard-headed program for what we do next."

Letter from MLK to Rebecca Taylor

Thursday, December 6, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Rutledge, Pennsylvania in support of the NAACP due to his responsibilities with the SCLC and his pastorate.

Western Union Telegram from Andrew Young to Nils J. Engelesen

NORWAY

In this telegram, Mr. Young informs Rev. Engelesen that Dr. King will accept his invitation to the reception.

Letter from Marshall Bean to MLK

Saturday, July 3, 1965
Maine (ME), Pennsylvania (PA)

Marshall Bean, a public school teacher suffering from cancer, writes Dr. King requesting an autographed picture and a "few words of joy."

Voter Education Project News

Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), GEORGIA, Louisiana (LA), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA)

This newsletter of the Voter Education Project reports on the progress of voter registration efforts in six southern states and a regional officeholders seminar for Negro city and county elected officials.

Index Card Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Metaphysics

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Bishop McConnell's views on Metaphysics, according to the book, "Is God Limited."

Letter from Nancy Keppy to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1962
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Iowa (IA)

Nancy Keppy, a high school student from Alabama, asks Dr. King to share his thoughts on integration and segregation.

Letter to MLK from Ray Cerreta

New York (NY)

Mr. Ray Cerreta, of Jackson Heights, New York, requests an autograph from Dr. King for his personal collection.

Transcript of Press Conference on Hotel Restaurant Desegregation

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King states in this 1962 press conference that he sees integration of Atlanta hotels and restaurants as imminent. With the exception of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, civil rights are progressing throughout the South. The many groups working on the issue are working toward a common goal and using a variety of strategies, including direct action, litigation, legislation, and education.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Sargent Shriver discusses the success of the Upward Bound program at Morehouse College. Upward Bound is a program as part of the national war against poverty.

Telegram from Alfred Duckett to Mrs. King

Friday, October 30, 1964
New York, NY

Alfred Duckett asks Mrs. King to airmail her "program breakdown" to meet a printing deadline.

Letter from Ernestine Comegys to SCLC

Monday, April 5, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

Ernestine Comegys writes the SCLC in hopes of obtaining commemorative plates of Dr. King containing his biography on the back. Comegys plans to sell the plates at her church.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Benjamin Hooks

Friday, November 11, 1966
Tennessee (TN)

In this letter Dr. King solicits the help of Mr. Hooks regarding allegations that SCLC associate Hosea Williams purchased stolen automobiles for SCLC. Dr. King asserts that the allegations should be investigated fully and enlists the aid of Benjamin Hooks, Chauncey Eskridge, and Joe Lowery.

Operation Breadbasket Sends Telegram Regarding Employment Discrimination

Friday, November 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Representatives of SCLC's Operation Breadbasket address the discriminatory employment practices of the Atlanta Metropolitan Area Civil Defense Council.

Social Gospel

New York (NY)

Dr. King defines social gospel with a quotation from Shailer Mathews and G. B. Smith's "A Dictionary of Religion and Ethics."

Letter from Harris McDowell, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Representative Harris McDowell, Jr. writes Dr. King stating that he voted against seating the Mississippi delegation. McDowell states, "I appreciate having your views regarding this important problem."

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. R. Schippers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965
NETHERLANDS

Rev. Young informs Dr. Schippers of arrival details for an upcoming trip to Amsterdam, Holland.

MLK Interview on NBC's Meet the Press

Sunday, March 28, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

This edition of NBC's Meet the Press featured Dr. King for a discussion concerning the Civil Rights Movement and its demonstrations. The interview was moderated by Ned Brooks and the panel featured John Chancellor, James J. Kilpatrick, Tom Wicker and Lawrence E. Spivak.

Letter from James Dombrowski to Mrs. King

Thursday, October 1, 1959
New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, James Dombrowski of the Southern Conference Educational Fund requests financial contributions from Mrs. Coretta S. King for a proposed publication to be entitled "The Color Line in Voting." The initial prototype publication would include the stories of Gus Courts and George W. Lee, who were assassinated, after refusing to remove their names from a voter registration list in Humphreys County, Mississippi.

House Illustrations by the Fair Housing Council in Greater Cleveland

Cleveland, OH

African Americans face discrimination in several suburbs of Cleveland Ohio. The Fair housing Council developed to promote integrated housing options.

Letter from MLK to the SCLC Executive Staff

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King informs the SCLC's Executive Board of a special meeting that will take place at Beamon's Restaurant. Outlined are the staff members who are expected to be in attendance and the topics they will review.

Telegram from Harry G. Boyte to Rev. John Papandrew

Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Harry Boyte expresses his happiness that Rev. John Papandrew will be working with the SCLC.

Letter from Floyd Henderson to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Florida (FL)

Floyd B. Henderson informs Dr. King that he supports African Americans as a whole. He proceeds to ask him to help elect Richard Nixon for President.

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Saturday, July 10, 1965
VIETNAM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, CUBA, Florida (FL), Hawaii (HI), HUNGARY, GUATEMALA, IRAN, BRAZIL

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."