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"CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC"

MLK Address to District 65 of the AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 8, 1962

Dr. King addresses District 65 of the AFL-CIO in Monticello, New York. He begins by expressing his appreciation to the AFL-CIO for their generous contributions to the Civil Rights Movement. He discusses the impact of the Albany Movement and segregation in the South. Dr. King makes the point that America refers to itself as a world leader, yet we are significantly behind other countries in social and welfare legislation.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to MLK

Monday, April 19, 1965

Annalee Stewart, Legislative and Branch Liaison for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, invites Dr. King to speak at the organization's fiftieth anniversary banquet. She provides a historic backdrop for the organization and explains its current focus on "Peace, Freedom and Bread."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Kjelle Eide

Monday, January 29, 1968

In this letter Dr. King is expressing regret to Kjell Eide for the continued difficulty in organizing the peace mission. He currently aims to focus on the organizational plans for domestic issues, but would still consider a proposed alternative.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee Democratic National Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a plea to the Democratic National Committee to provide a delegate from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party so that there may be equal representation within the state. Dr. King's feels that by providing a delegate it may discontinue the prevention of political participation of African Americans in Mississippi.

The Student Voice: The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Newsletter

In this issue of The Student Voice, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee writes about the progress being made in the Civil Rights Movement, including recent ... desegregation of all public golf courses in Mobile, Alabama and the desegregation of lunch counters in Atlanta, Georgia.

Arnobius

Dr. King gives information on fourth century teacher, Arnobius and his conversion to Christianity.

Letter from Louis Braun to MLK

Thursday, July 29, 1965

The National Chairman of the Campus Americans for Democratic Action reminds Dr. King of an earlier letter in which Dr. King was invited to serve on the organization's advisory board. Braun also lists individuals who have agreed to serve on the board.

Science

Dr. King quotes a statement from A.D. Ritchie's "Civilization, Science and Religion" regarding the limits of science. Ritchie contradicts the idea that science can do "anything and everything."

Letter from Carey Preston to Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Mrs. Carey B. Preston confirms the details of Dr. King's trip to Philadelphia to speak at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Convention.

MLK's Remarks on Conference with the President

Monday, June 23, 1958

Dr. King provides the perspective he shared at a meeting held by the President with leaders from the white and Negro community discussing civil rights. His speech includes several steps to reach equality across the US.

SCLC Annual Board Meeting Agenda

This agenda details a 1966 SCLC annual board meeting in Miami, Florida. On April 12, a review of the White House Conference on Civil Rights took place. On April 13, Andrew Young presented the Program Analysis and Future Projection.

Notes for U.F.T. Address

On March 14, 1964, Dr. King was presented with the John Dewey Award by the United Teachers Federation. The address he delivered that day is outlined in this type-written draft along with his handwritten notes. In the draft, Dr. King emphasizes the importance of education, especially as a tool for African American advancement. He cites how the deprivation of education has been used as a way to systematically oppress African Americans and he asserts that this inequality is a reality that must be confronted. Dr.

New Harassment: The Lunacy Test by MLK

Saturday, June 23, 1962

Dr. King identifies events that demonstrate the absurd actions of the racist opposition during the Freedom Movement in the South.

Telegram from Melvin Arnold to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962

Melvin Arnold asks Dr. King to approve either "The Strength to Love" or "The Cost of Love" as the title of Dr. King's book.

Telegram from Charles Pincjard to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

Charles Pincjard writes Dr. King to confirm the date for a the WMPP Awards Brunch.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to C. I. C. Bosanquet

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Dora McDonald informs C. I. C. Bosanquet, the Vice Chancellor at the University of Newcastle, of Dr. King's upcoming arrival to the university and regrets his inability to stay longer.

Thousands Protest Bombings

This article discusses the numerous civil rights demonstrations taking place around the country surrounding the 1963 Birmingham church bombings.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harold E. Carlson

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend Carlson to thank him for his recent telegram of encouragement and support. Dr. King states, "You may be confident that such reassurance provides us with an additional source of strength." Dr. King also discusses the philosophy of the SCLC.

Letter from Harry Grossweiner to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Harry Grossweiner, Executive Vice President of Friends of Father Pire, Inc., expressed to Dr. King that he thought Dr. King would be interested in Father Pire's new book, and also indicated that any comments or suggestion would be appreciated.

Telegram from MLK to Nicholas Biddle

Friday, March 16, 1962

Dr. King apologizes to Nicholas Biddle for being unable to attend the testimonial for Senator Jacob Javits.

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet Featuring Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967

This document contains speeches given at the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet. Sidney Poitier, a Bahamian American actor, gives the keynote address. He makes a very compelling statement during his address asserting, "to change the world we must change men." Also featured are brief speeches by Dr. King, Andrew Young, and Dorothy Cotton.

Letter From Kivie Kaplan to MLK

Sunday, February 5, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Kaplan thanks "Coretta and Martin" for their cards and acknowledges the preparation of Dr. King's fourth book.

The Atlanta Constitution: Dr. King Warns Against the Riots

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson describes Dr. King's position against violent race riots and the consequences of these movements on the Black and White community.

Anthropology

Dr. King outlines and references ideas on anthropology.

Letter from Alice McBee to MLK

Wednesday, September 7, 1966

Alice McBee expresses her admiration for Dr. King and dedicates two of her poems to the King family.

Letter from Rev. Charles William Butler to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1961

Dr. King writes to Rev. Charles William Butler of the Metropolitan Baptist Church to acknowledge receipt of his kind letter concerning moral support. Dr. King references his shock of reading about a vicious attack made by Dr. Jackson accusing him of conspiracy. Stating that numerous friends have suggested that the Reverend sue Jackson, Dr. King expresses his decision to be adherent to his basic philosophy of non-violence.

Race Problems in Albany

Wednesday, December 13, 1961

In the midst of some very disturbing events taking place in Albany, GA, Edward P. Morgan of the American Broadcasting Company writes this captivating broadcast message reflecting his personal view of the Negro's increasing self-awareness and recognition of its place in society.

Letter from Joseph A. Scahill to Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Following Dr. King's assassination, Minister Joseph Scahill sent this letter of sympathy to Mrs. King. Minister Scahill mentioned, briefly, his participation in the 1965 Selma campaign with Dr. King and vowed to continue such work.