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"CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC"

Letter from H. Rogosin to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

H. Rogosin writes to Dr. King encouraging him to read the enclosed material on "The Role of Psychologists in Helping Solve Problems of Intergroup and Racial Tensions."

Letter from Rev. O. Tregelles Williams to MLK

Friday, February 10, 1967

Rev. Williams invites Dr. King to appear on a weekly BBC religious television program entitled "Meeting Point" during his visit to Wales in Great Britain.

Letter from Eleanor S. Greve to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Eleanor Greve writes Dr. King to express the encouragement and inspiration she and her husband felt while reading a portion of Dr. King's speech in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The speech was given before the Chicago Area Committee for a Sane Nuclear policy.

Jesus

Dr. King cites a quote from Claude J. Montefiore's book, "Some Elements of the Religious Teaching of Jesus."

Letter from Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes to MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes' letter to Dr. King to discusses her concerns regarding living in urban environments. She maintains that personal responsibility initiatives are more in order than current ones, e.g. family planning and self-improvement through education and job training.

Letter from Ben-Zion Ilan to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

The American Representative of the General Federation of Labor in Israel writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize. He also reiterates a request for Dr. King to visit Israel as the guest of Histadrut, the Executive Director of the organization.

Letter from Marsha and Roger Zimmerman to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman send a note of support to Dr. King's for his statements regarding the Vietnam conflict.

MLK Announces The Jail Sentences Stemming from the 1963 Birmingham Demonstrations

Monday, October 30, 1967

Dr. King makes this statement regarding the arrest of himself and other leaders of the 1963 Birmingham struggle. The Supreme Court in 1967 ruled that these leaders unjustly broke the city wide injunction banning demonstrations. Dr. King urges the nation, "Take heed. Do not allow the Bill of Rights to become a prisoner of war."

Letter to MLK from John Yeatman

Saturday, May 6, 1967

John Yeatman sends his gratitude for all of Dr. King's efforts in teaching peace and wishes him well in every endeavor.

Letter from Beth Arnold to MLK

Ms. Arnold writes to inform Dr. King that she is head of his campaign committee for a campus movement for the upcoming election. She asks for any campaign material Dr. King can provide.

MLK Address at Dinner Honoring Jackie Robinson

Friday, July 20, 1962

This is the transcript of Dr. King's address at the 1962 Hall of Fame Dinner honoring Jackie Robinson in New York City. Dr. King praises Robinson for standing up for civil rights as the first Negro to break Major League Baseball's color barrier.

Metaphysics

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson’s “The Philosophy of Personalism” as a good defense.

Letter from Isaac Franck to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

Issac Franck extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at Adas Israel. Adas Israel is the largest Conservative Congregation in the Greater Washington area.

Letter from the Norway-American Association to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Ragnhild Galtung, director of the Norway-American Association, congratulates Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to speak during his upcoming visit to Oslo.

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Monday, May 24, 1965

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Josephine Baker offers support and encouragement to Dr. King in the civil rights campaign and asserts "without unity there cannot be a solid victory."

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Letter from Charles T. Dubin to MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Attorney at Law, Charles T. Dubin writes Dr. King to express his approval of the nonviolent practices of the SCLC, and assures Dr. King of the legal effect on the American judicial system. Dubin closes by imploring that Dr. King does not place himself in jeopardy and danger of life and limb.

The Museum of Negro History and Art 1967 Calendar

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Distributed by the Museum of Negro History and Art, this calendar was used by Coretta Scott King and contains biographies of famous African American musicians. Mrs. King studied at the New England Conservatory to be an opera singer. On this calendar, she also marked April 27th as "my birthday."

Letter from Evelyn Rawley to Billy Mills

Friday, March 3, 1967

Evelyn E. Rawley writes Billy Mills, chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee, to express distaste for Mills' choice of colleagues, political activity, and lack of reason. Rawley affirms that Mill's irresponsible actions are an obstacle to democratic practices.

Primacy of Events

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead’s view on the primacy of events over space and time.

Annual Record and Report of Life and Work

This document is a blank "Annual
Record and Report of Life and Work" for the American Baptist Convention. Had it been filled out, it would have contained information about the activities of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from MLK to Ann Patricia Herring

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Dr. King congratulates Ann Herring on her new marriage and apologizes for misfiling her earlier letters asking him to perform her marriage ceremony. He assures her that if he had seen her letters, he would have made his best attempt to perform the ceremony.

Letter from Joan Daves to Tetsuo Kohmoto

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Tetsuo Kohmoto that his letter to Dr. King has come. Joan also says that the terms are being worked out with Katahira of Charles E. Tuttle Co. The letter closes by telling Mr. Kohmoto that he will be hearing more about the matter.

Science (Definition)

Dr. King records a definition of science.

Letter from SNCC's Judy Richardson to Coretta Scott King

Sunday, September 5, 1965

Judy Richardson of SNCC writes to Mrs. King to give her a copy of the new Negro history primer, "Negroes in American History." The book serves as a method of teaching children about African American history while tying in elements of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Kenyan Student to MLK

Monday, March 5, 1962

A student writes Dr. King expressing support for his movement and social views in regards to Civil Rights.

Faith

Dr. King agrees with Justin Martyr on faith and rationality.

Letter from Henrietta Buckmaster to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Henrietta Buckmaster expresses her admiration for Dr. King's stance on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Alice Glaser to MLK

Wednesday, June 26, 1963

Alice Glaser, Assistant Editor for Esquire Magazine, requests that Dr. King write an article entitled "A Day in a Southern Jail" regarding the actual details of his incarceration in the Birmingham jail.