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"CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC"

Grotius

Dr. King writes that Grotius' view was "that God should be thought of as 'a great moral ruler'" and that Christ's death was "but a tribute to the sanctity of a divine government."

Letter from John Coventry Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

John Coventry Smith, a member of the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., invites Dr. King to Brazil to speak at the Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary during his tenure in the South American country. Mr. Smith asserts that Dr. King's appearance is of importance to the young potential leaders of Brazil. Dr. King will further enlighten the Protestants in Brazil of the Christian faith to the racial issues in the United States.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Casten, M.D.

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Dr. King took the opportunity to address this letter to Daniel Casten, M.D. thanking him for his financial donation to the Mississippi "James Meredith" March. He noted that the march allowed Negroes, in Mississippi, to resolve their fears and fight for justice. A key quotation, in this document, stated to Dr. Casten, "You are a part of that dedicated group of people standing as a beacon light of hope to all of the disinherited men and women of our nation."

Letter from Ada Krozier to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967

Ada Krozier encloses a contribution to Dr. King for his work in the civil rights movement and his stance on the Vietnam War. She feels that Dr. King's position is an opportunity to pursue peace and call an end to the war.

MLK's Address to Addison Junior High

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Dr. King explains the importance of education and encourages the students to exercise their abilities to the fullest and strive for excellence. Dr. King further describes the duties each student must fulfill to make an impact on their community and the world.

Prospective Negotiation Procedure with Merchants

This draft document outlines a plan to eradicate racial discrimination during the Civil Rights Movement. It includes a detailed list of prospective negotiation procedures with merchants and a timeline for events in Birmingham, Alabama.

Hruska Says Capital...

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

Request for SCLC Information from Frederick A. Meiser Jr.

Frederick Meiser tells Dr. King that he has become deeply interested in the SCLC and requests more information about the organization.

Letter from Shinichi Oshima to MLK

Fifteen year old Shinichi Oshima of Japan, writes Dr. King expressing his admiration and appreciation for the movement and the black man. He also discusses his religious views and his desire to help black men in Africa.

The Negro In America: What Must Be Done

Monday, December 4, 1967

In a full page of letters to the editor, civil rights advocates praise the Newsweek cover issue on the Negro in America for its analysis of the racial crisis and editorial recommendations for an emergency national program of action.

Letter from Angie Elizabeth Shelton to MLK

Mrs. Shelton expresses her gratitude to Dr. King for renewing her faith. After reading one of Dr. King's books, she states that she felt herself beginning to believe. Mrs. Shelton has decided to buy and study "Civil Disobedience" thanks to Dr. King.

Letter from Christine Schulty to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Christine Schulty offers condolences to Mrs. King after the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from June Gordon to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

June Gordon, as the Executive Director of the Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, issues a check to SCLC. They also pledge to assist other civil rights groups involved in the struggle for equality.

Daily News: NAACP Anti-South Propaganda Article

Thursday, March 5, 1959

The author writes about a secret meeting that was held at the NAACP's headquarters regarding race identification.

Getting Caught in the Negative

Dr. King references the Book of Acts regarding his sermon "Getting Caught in the Negative." King asserts, "Don't get bogged down in the negative. Christianity must forever offer to the world a dynamic positive."

Telegram from Clark Macgregor to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Clark Macgregor sends a telegram to Dr. King informing him of his vote against the dismissal of the Mississippi Challenge.

Letter from Ben-Zion Ilan to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

The American Representative of the General Federation of Labor in Israel writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize. He also reiterates a request for Dr. King to visit Israel as the guest of Histadrut, the Executive Director of the organization.

Letter from Constance Webb to MLK and Joan Daves

Thursday, March 2, 1967

In this letter, Constance Webb asks Dr. King to share more details about the comments Richard Wright made about "perhaps there was more behind the incident then simply a "mad" woman.", referring to the lady who stabbed Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Colonel Harold C. Wall

Thursday, January 11, 1968

In a letter to Colonel Harold C. Wall, Dr. King writes to appeal the Selective Service case of Thomas E. Houck Jr. He has been classified as 1-A by Local Board #75, meaning he was available for unrestricted service. Dr. King wanted to change Houck's classification to 1-O based on Houck's moral devotion to peace.

Pride

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves informed Dr. King that “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" would not be able to be converted into a paperback book. Joan Daves is Dr. King’s literary agent.

The Other America

Sunday, March 10, 1968

Dr. King delivered this speech, "The Other America," for the Local 1199 Salute to Freedom program. The speech emphasized the need to address poverty, the Vietnam War, and race relations in America.

Letter from MLK to Jimmie Wattson

Friday, March 16, 1962

Dr. King acknowledges his receipt of Jimmie Wattson's letter and expresses his deep concern for Mr. Wattson's imprisonment. Dr. King explains to Mr. Wattson that the SCLC does not have legal staff to handle matters. Dr. King suggests that he write the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter from Miss Shirley Wright to Mrs. King

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Mrs. King writes Shirley Wright of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, thanking her for the copy of the "We Shall Overcome" record.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Friday, May 28, 1965

Laurence Kirkpatrick writes Dr. King on behalf of the World Convention of Churches and Christ expressing their appreciation for Dr. King's acceptance of their invitation and discusses the travel logistics.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

Thursday, June 18, 1964

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Joan Daves reminds Dr. King of her request for an available copy of his "doctors dissertation", for possible national and international publication.

Briefing Sheet on Cleveland's Civil Rights Issues

This document contains the briefing notes on Cleveland's Civil Rights Issues.

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.