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"CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC"

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King writes notes on perceiving God using Nelson Henry Wieman's text, "The Source of Human God."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Benjamin E. Mays Regarding Meeting

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

In this letter to Benjamin Mays, the president of Morehouse College, Dora McDonald state that Dr. King will be in attendance at their meeting on December 19, 1962.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Monday, September 9, 1963
Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Christology

Dr. King references the concept of Christology by quoting German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from A. Morsbach to MLK

Tuesday, October 18, 1966
New York, NY, ISRAEL

A. Morsbach writes Dr. King regarding his tour to the Holy Land. Having years of experience with group travel, Morsbach informs Dr. King that he plans to check the background of Concreta Tours. He further suggests that King investigate Concreta Tours prior to concluding final travel arrangements.

Letter from the Dutch Vietnam Committee to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967
NETHERLANDS, VIETNAM

An unknown author writes Dr. King on behalf of the Dutch Vietnam Committee to seek assistance in stopping the bombing in Vietnam. The committee requests Dr. King record a few powerful remarks which will hopefully influence ending the war.

Letter from Marshall Bean to MLK

Saturday, July 3, 1965
Maine (ME), Pennsylvania (PA)

Marshall Bean, a public school teacher suffering from cancer, writes Dr. King requesting an autographed picture and a "few words of joy."

Suffering

Dr. King notes his thoughts on the question of the Biblical prophet Habakkuk: "why do the wicked prosper?"

First Congregational Church Program

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is listed to speak at an evening church service entitled, "The Immorality of Racial Segregation."

SCLC Minutes

This undated and unsigned memorandum functions essentially as minutes for an SCLC strategy session.

A Message from Jail

Saturday, July 21, 1962
Albany, GA

After being arrested and charged with parading without a license, Dr. King wrote a column from jail. The column shared his and Ralph David Abernathy's decision to serve the jail sentence instead of paying a fine of $178.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy regarding the topic of monotheism.

Evil

Dr. King quotes the definition of evil and conceptualizes it as a "frustration."

Letter from Paul Verghese to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1966
SWITZERLAND, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Texas (TX), Dallas, TX, Missouri (MO), Kansas (KS), SWEDEN, South Africa

Father Verghese requests Dr. King provide a written statement regarding what spiritual resources he draws upon, to cope with the constant threat from elements of American Society, and how he uses this as a basis for his position on nonviolence.

Memorandum from MLK

Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Boston, MA

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

The Christian Century: Civil Rights Bill Move to Fore

Wednesday, June 5, 1957
Washington, D.C.

The Christian Century expounds on the advancement of the Civil Rights Bill in the United States. The article highlights Dr. King as a "prophetic Christian leader" and details the Negros who assembled for the March on Washington. The author lists numerous reasons correlating the positive affect of allowing Negro's the right to vote.

Letter from H. M. Joshi to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967
INDIA, AFGHANISTAN

H. M. Joshi of India communicates with Dr. King following Dr. King's address at Howard University on the subject of nonviolence. He informs Dr. King about Khan Abdul Ghafar Khan and his influence as a nonviolent soldier in India. Joshi also requests a combination of Dr. King's statements and publications surrounding nonviolence.

SCLC's Operation Breadbasket - Quarterly Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Chicago, IL, Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA, Milwaukee, WI, Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, North Carolina (NC), Detroit, MI

The SCLC issued this comprehensive quarterly report on the activities of Operation Breadbasket. Operation Breadbasket focused on acquiring jobs and economic development for the Negro community through contract negotiations and boycotts.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
Dallas, TX

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

Announcement Flyer

This flyer to the public announces that W.S.O. and Dr. King will be holding a warm up rally.

Letter from Marsh Clark to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, December 18, 1963
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY

Acting Bureau Chief of Time Magazine, Marsh Clark encloses a Christmas gift for Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald. Clark jokingly requests that Dr. King not have plane layovers in small towns with weird names.

Letter from Mrs. Behlen to Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Mrs. Behlen congratulates Ralph Abernathy for the wonderful job he did during the funeral services for Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter Seeger

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
New York (NY), Tokyo, Japan, JAPAN

Ms. McDonald informs American folk singer,Peter Seeger, that Dr. King will be unable to accept the invitation to appear on a Japan television program in January or February of the coming year. Dr. King asks that Mr. Seeger informs the program host that sometime during the summer would be more favorable for his schedule.

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Bolt Culbertson

Tuesday, January 7, 1964
South Carolina (SC), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Culbertson that Dr. King is grateful for the invitation to speak at a South Carolina fundraiser for the families of Medgar Evers and the children killed in the Birmingham church bombing, but will be unable to attend. Miss McDonald refers Culbertson to contact Roy Wilkins of the NAACP to be a possible keynote speaker.

Letter from Robert M. Gomsrud to MLK Regarding the Nobel Prize

Thursday, November 12, 1964
Minnesota (MN)

In this letter, Robert M. Gomsrud, President of the Minneapolis Central Labor Union Council, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter to the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty from Richard W. Boone

Monday, August 29, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

Richard W. Boone provides the officers and vice chairmen of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty with the forthcoming meeting dates and attendance card.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy Regarding MLK Memorial Service

Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Dr. Abernathy receives this letter from an anonymous sender suggesting that the SCLC plan a memorial service in commemoration of Dr. King on Emancipation Day. The writer provides a list of music and poems that would be appropriate for the occasion.

Pessimism

Dr. King quotes John Hodgdon Bradley from an article in the December 1932 Atlantic Monthly, “Letter from a Scientist to a Priest.”

Letter from MLK to Gaylord Nelson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Gaylord Nelson, a United States Senator from Wisconsin, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.