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"CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC"

Invitation from Nuhu Bamali to Dr. and Mrs. King

Dr. and Mrs. King receive an invitation to a reception from the Chairman of the Nigerian Delegation to the Twentieth Session of the General Assembly and Deputy Foreign Minister.

Letter From Peggy Mann to MLK Regarding Children's Book

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

Mann informs King of the recent publication of the children's book "The Street of the Flower Boxes", a book which concerns itself with matters of integration. Mann, requests that Dr. King provide comments or suggested persons of whom may be interested in the literature.

Letter from Alma Szatmary to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Alma Szatmary writes Dr. King concerning his stance on the Vietnam war. Szatmary writes that it should be prohibited for Puerto Ricans and African Americans to serve as oppressors in Vietnam when they are the ones being oppressed here at home.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has spoken to Harper & Row about advertising. She expects that advertisements in "Ebony" and in "The Amsterdam News" will run on July 2nd and 16th.

Background Paper on the Student Sit-in Protest Movement

The Division of Racial Minorities and the Division of Christian Citizenship of the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church give some background information on the "sit-in protest movement" and list three points in summary.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Operation Breadbasket: A Statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Dr. King announces an agreement made with Pick-n-Pay Supermarkets that will open numerous jobs for the Negro community. The

Ave Maria National Catholic Weekly: A Voice for Harlem

Monday, July 31, 1967

Dan Griffin forwards this letter to Dr. King with an enclosure of a magazine from Ave Marie, entitled "A Voice for Harlem." The magazine includes several topics such as hunger in the United States, the War in Vietnam, and worship in the Soviet Union.

MLK's Statement on Current Electoral Politics

This is the draft of a statement that Dr. King planned to make, concerning the state of politics in America. Dr. King expresses his disappointment in that "the quality of some of the men elected makes a mockery of responsible government," and urges African-Americans to "lose faith in a shallow 'good will' that provides nothing."

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee is having an event with Dr. King as their guest speaker and special musical performances by artist such as Mahalia Jackson.

Letter to MLK from A Friend of Justice and Democracy

Tuesday, February 14, 1967

An anonymous individual writes Dr. King to declare that the Jewish people are responsible for the oppression of Negroes.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 6, 1967

Joan Daves sends Dora McDonald a letter of thanks concerning a photostat of a letter sent to Dr. King. She also informs her that although the title of Dr. King's book has been used, one cannot copyright titles.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Wachtel

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Ms. McDonald sends Mr. Wachtel Dr. King's schedules for visiting Oslo, Norway. Dr. King is traveling to Norway to receive his Nobel Peace Prize.

Richard Millard Congratulates MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Richard Millard, the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Boston University, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Thomas Baker to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Baker, a student in New York City, sends his condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Telegram from Carl and Anne Braden to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960

Carl and Anne Braden offer their support to Dr. King while he remains in the Fulton County Jail.

Letter from John Madigan to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Madigan writes to Dr. King thanking him for his participation in a CBS Television program "At Random." He invites Dr. King to participate in another program entitled "Target: News."

Letter from Esther M. Jackson to McGeorge Bundy

Friday, May 19, 1967

Esther Jackson, a professor at Shaw University, writes George Bundy of the Ford Foundation expressing his dismay in the support of a segregated theatre. Jackson also expresses his disappointment in Dr. King and Roy Wilkins for not recognizing the discrimination taking place in form of cultural separatism.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

Chapter IV - Weiman's Conception of God

Dr. King professes his ideas and viewpoints as they relate to Henry Nelson Wieman's theology on God. Wieman, an American philosopher of Naturalistic Religion, believed that God was a natural process rather than a supernatural entity.

Outline for "Levels of Love"

In this handwritten outline, Dr. King highlights the subject of love. The document titled, “Levels of Love," focused on four categories: utilitarian love, romantic love, humanitarian love and Christian love.

Royalties from "Why We Can't Wait"

Sunday, April 30, 1967

This document is a reference to the royalties earned from Dr.King's book "Why we Can't Wait", the Norwegian edition.

The Nation: Fumbling on the New Frontier by MLK

Saturday, March 3, 1962

Dr. King elaborates on a report regarding civil rights and the collective efforts with the Kennedy Administration to eradicate racial discrimination. The Executive Orders from President Kennedy are unprecedented as he is attempting to eliminate employment discrimination and has appointed Negroes to key government positions. In an effort not to move "too fast," the President's legislative programs have now commenced a pace that is parallel with the consensus. Dr.

Executive Orders

Dr. King drafts numerous directives pertaining to the 1964 expenses of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964

Carey B. Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority thanks Dr. King for his willingness to participate in the Forty-first Boule held in Philadelphia.

Memorial Service Flyer - Robert F. Kennedy

Robert F. Kennedy, Attorney General of the United States offered extemporaneous remarks on the death of Dr. King. He wrote, "What we need in the United States...is love and wisdom and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our own country, whether they be white or they be black."

Letter from R. William Johnson to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966

Bill Johnson writes Dr. King with an interest in starting a chapter of the SCLC in Oak Ridge. Johnson also invites Dr. King to visit Oak Ridge and speak with members of its community.

Letter to Mrs. H.G. Smith from MLK

Wednesday, October 13, 1965

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Smith for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the current efforts of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

Letter from Angie Elizabeth Shelton to MLK

Mrs. Shelton expresses her gratitude to Dr. King for renewing her faith. After reading one of Dr. King's books, she states that she felt herself beginning to believe. Mrs. Shelton has decided to buy and study "Civil Disobedience" thanks to Dr. King.

Letter to MLK from Mrs. Mary Jane Chattams

Friday, November 17, 1967

Mrs. Chattams, a student, has contacted Dr. King for further clarity regarding a sermon he reportedly delivered in a Communist Church. Sharing Dr. King’s comments will be informative and beneficial for future class discussions.