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"CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC"

Letter from the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1968

The executive board of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket informs Dr. King of the works and efforts of their organization. The SCLC's Operation Breadbasket originated the very principles and methods in which the Milwaukee chapter operates. The chapter has initiated many employment opportunities and increased the economic status of the Negro community. Dr. King is requested to provide them with the official documentation to charter their chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Furthermore, they would greatly appreciate the opportunity to see Dr. King in an appearance in Milwaukee.

Gift from the Jersey City Chapter of the American Jewish Congress to MLK

The Jersey City Chapter of the Women's Division of the American Jewish Congress made a donation to the Louise Waterman Wise Youth Center in Jerusalem in Dr. King's name. They sent him this note, wishing him a very speedy recovery and good luck.

Religious Witness For Human Dignity Booklet

Sunday, May 31, 1964

Religious Witness for Human Dignity seeks the support of members of the Protestant, Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Jewish Communities in the struggle for civil rights.

March on Washington Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This document outlines the program held at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Constitution and Bylaws of the SCLC

This booklet contains the constitution and bylaws of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, October 9, 1963

Major J. Jones wishes to confirm Dr. King's speaking engagement at the Jobs and Freedom Conference in Chattanooga, Tennessee on November 13, 1963.

Making the Best of A Bad Mess

Sunday, April 24, 1966

This text of Dr. King's "Making the Best of a Bad Mess" sermon encourages the congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church to remain faithful in times of destitution. He makes clear the point that happiness is not found, but is instead created.

Letter from Harriet Davis to Dr. King Regarding Eugene Peterson's editorial

Sunday, July 30, 1967

In this letter, Harriet Davis informs Dr. King that she is a white women who has decided to teach at a Fairmont High School, which was formerly completely Negro. Although she has received criticism for her decision she proclaims that her motivations are right. She then informs Dr. King that she fears not being able to understand her co-workers and students.

We Shall Overcome

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

This program serves as a memorial exercise for Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carol Robertson and Cynthia Wesley.

Letter from MLK to Blaine Marrin

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Blaine Marrin and the local 157 UAW members for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the relationship between the labor and civil rights movements. He also discusses the financial needs of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.

Letter from David Mocine to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

David Mocine writes on the economic disparity in the United States regarding African Americans in relation to their percentage of the population.

Letter from Margaret & Richard Dodge to MLK

Sunday, March 21, 1965

Margaret and Richard Dodge inform Dr. King of a successful fundraiser they hosted and enclose the profits to help Dr. King in the civil rights movement.

Some Information About Black Africa Culture

This document discusses various discoveries that have been made about African civilizations and their cultures.

Letter from MLK to Edwin and Louise Flowers

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

In this correspondence to Mr. Edwin C. and Mrs. Louise M. Flowers from Dr. King, he wanted to personally thanked Mr. Edwin and Mrs. Flowers for their generous contribution to SCLC and to express his appreciation and gratitude for their support toward the Civil Right Movement.

Letter from Francis M. Evans to MLK

Thursday, August 13, 1964

Francis Evans wishes to acquire an autographed portrait of Dr. King for his employee, Captain Arthur Graves. Captain Graves is in preparation for a transfer and Evans wants to honor Graves with a special memento.

Notes - Dr. King's Rough Draft of a Response to Mr. Walter Harding

This document is a rough draft of Dr. King's thank-you letter to Mr. Harding for a book he dedicated in part to Dr. King.

Letter from Joan Daves to Philip Hanson

Friday, December 11, 1964

Here Joan Daves gives permission to Mr. Phillip Hanson for the use of words from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait", requested by Philip Hanson.

A Letter to MLK to President Lyndon B. Johsnon

Friday, April 13, 1962

In a letter to MLK, President Lyndon B. Johnson addresses the issue of Federal employment in Atlanta. Johnson informs King of the previous meeting held with the Civil Service Commission and the steps being taken to move forward.

Project Chicago Staff Meeting Minutes

Monday, July 3, 1967

This document recaps the minutes of the Project Chicago staff meeting held at West Side Christian Parish on July 3, 1967. Dr. King is listed as a proposed member of the Advisory Committee.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt T. Walker to Samual Weston

Monday, April 30, 1962

Wyatt T. Walker and Dr. King sent this telegram to Samual Weston informing him that they were requesting an investigation of his complaint.

Letter from William Kunstler to Arthur Shores

Friday, March 9, 1962

Attorney William Kunstler writes to Arthur Shores about a legal case involving Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth.

Outline for The Secret of Adjustment

In this sermon, Dr. King notes applicable methods used to deal with the tensions in life. It is said that "the secret to adjustment is to find contentment." King further references the experience of the Apostle Paul and what he learned in confronting this problem.

Letter from Cantor Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom writes to Miss McDonald requesting some of Dr. King's biographical material. Cantor Mendelson also informs her that he has met with Dr. King's attorney, Clarence Jones, to discuss the "I Have A Dream" as a "basis of a musical work."

Theology

Dr. King asserts that religion and theology must coincide with one another because, "religion without theology is blind; theology without religion is empty."

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ferre's view on religion.

Letter from Phillip S. Gelb to MLK

Saturday, May 4, 1963

Mr. Phillip Gelb encloses a donation to the SCLC and states that he appreciates the efforts being made by the protestors in Birmingham. Furthermore, he identifies the movement as the "most vital and pro-American in the nation today."

Schleiermacher (Original Sin)

Dr. King records Friedrich Schleiermacher’s views on original sin.

Letter from Marion Dockhorn to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, April 16, 1962

Marion Dockhorn invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 5th Annual Bucks County World Peace Fair. Dockhorn believes that Dr. King's attendance will boost support for the civil rights movement by providing a place to "spread [the] message."

Revelation as a Way of Knowing

Dr. King quotes and discusses Henry Nelson Wieman’s view of revelation and knowledge as described in “The Source of Human Good.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”