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Sin

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's "Pensees."

Swedish Martin Luther King Fund

Tuesday, March 29, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, DENMARK, NORWAY, FINLAND

The Martin Luther King Fund was an internationally housed organization in which numerous countries participated in helping to support and spread Dr. King's messages. This document represents the facts and activity program of the Swedish organization headquartered in Stockholm. Included are lists of the Executive Committee, Honorary Board members, and activities designed to create a better understanding of Dr. King's work.

Thank You Note to Martin Luther King Jr. from Mt. Olive Baptist Church

Sunday, July 30, 1967

This letter was written to Dr.King from the Mt.Olive Baptist Church. They were sending a donation to the SCLC and thanking them for rebuilding their church that had been burned.

Letter from the Seventh Grade Class of Woodward School to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968
FRANCE, CANADA

Anita Davis, Gail Williams, and Joan Rockwell request an interview with Dr. King for their class project.

Letter from Leonard Manning to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Leonard Manning offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Missouri (MO)

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

Letter from MLK to Oklahomans for Negotiation Now

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
Oklahoma (OK)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Oklahoma City extended by Margaret Novitski of Oklahomans for Negotiation Now.

Letter from E. P. and M. C. King to President Johnson

Saturday, July 29, 1967
Jacksonville, FL, Washington, D.C.

The Kings write President Johnson to discuss their dissatisfaction that neither Dr. King nor Charles Evers was appointed a member of the Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder.

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.

SCLC Booklet

Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., St. Augustine, FL, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Cleveland, OH, Memphis, TN, VIETNAM, CAMBODIA, South Carolina (SC), Tallahassee, FL

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

Give Decency A Chance in the South...

Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), North Carolina (NC), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Kentucky (KY), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Arkansas (AR), Texas (TX), Oklahoma (OK), Tennessee (TN), Maryland (MD), Florida (FL), West Virginia (WV), Delaware (DE)

The Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) is working toward eliminating "all forms of racial segregation in the Southern and border States." This brochure highlights SCEF's accomplishments, supporters, programs and future.

MLK Sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, January 16, 1966
Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

As pastor of Ebenezer, Dr. King delivered this particular sermon to his congregation in January of 196. He begins by referencing representative-elect Julian Bond's statement against war and against America's involvement in Vietnam, and he commends Mr. Bond for being courageous enough to speak his mind. He uses quotes from historical figures and biblical passages to support his claim that humans should be men of conviction and not of conformity. Dr.

Letter from Mr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Saturday, September 15, 1962

Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King he has reviewed the document sent to President Kennedy on 5/17/62.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

New York, NY

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Letter from MLK to Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxiliary Members Expresing Thanks for Their Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967
Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA

Dr. King thanks the Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxilary Members for their generous contribution to S.C.L.C. Dr. King acknowledges the impact of such support on improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter from L. Martinez to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Mrs. L. Martinez describes to Dr. King what she has observed about the Lawndale area in Chicago, Illinois. She suggests that instead of relocating to other neighborhoods, the tenants of Lawndale initiate a clean up of the area themselves.

Letter from Lyndon B. Johnson to MLK

Monday, May 18, 1964
Washington, D.C.

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes Dr. King, thanking him for sending him an advance copy of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Gerald Feffer to MLK

Thursday, October 17, 1963
Philadelphia, PA

Gerald Feffer of Lehigh University invites Dr. king to speak at the university in the near future.

MLK Public Statement on the Poor People's Campaign

Monday, December 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King announces several initiatives of the SCLC. He explains that due to severe displays of discrimination the SCLC and other organizations will continue the non-violent movement with a demonstration in Washington, D.C. Dr. King further paints the picture of inequality among the races by providing several illustrations of discrimination.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Parker

Dr. King sympathizes with the unfortunate plight of Mrs. Parker's financial situation and encourages her to remain steadfast.

Letter from the British and Foreign Bible Society to MLK

Saturday, September 10, 1966
UNITED KINGDOM, New York (NY), New York, NY

The British and Foreign Bible Society invites Dr. King to their Bible Week at Aberystwyth during the summer of 1967. The society is commemorating the 400th anniversary of Welsh New Testament. Rev. T. J. Davies informs Dr. King of possible publication opportunities for his book that can take place during his stay in Aberystwyth.

Conditions for Entering the Kingdom

Dr. King opens these sermon notes by discussing a child's behavior and actions. According to King, "a child has the inexhaustible capacity to forgive" and is inquisitive, honest, and open-minded. These are characteristics that adults should possess, which would help them gain entry into the Kingdom.

Letter from John Due Jr. to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL

Mr. Due writes Dr. King to offer his services as a Field Representative for the SCLC. He provides a summary of his Civil Rights background along with a list of character references.

Monroe, Mich. News, "From the Book Bag"

Monday, June 26, 1967
GERMANY, FRANCE

A review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was published by the Monroe, Michigan newspaper. The review outlined the positions Dr. King took on the Vietnam War and the Black Power movement. The author of this review considered Dr. King to be "an advocate-articulate, persistent and exhortative." Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" was published and released in 1967.

Telegram to MLK from the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Club

Wednesday, September 24, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

The New York Chapter of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Club wishes a speedy recovery to Dr. King while he is hospitalized in Harlem Hospital.

Letter from William E. Mason to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
PUERTO RICO

Bill Mason writes to discuss Dr. King's trip to Puerto Rico and reminds him of their conversation about the efforts of the SCLC. Mason explains that he is operating the first interracial camp on the island throughout the summer and hopes that he will be able to assist the SCLC sometime during the year.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964
Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN)

Major J. Jones writes to Dr. King, offering to host the SCLC's Annual Spring Board Meeting in Chattanooga, where he is a district superintendent of the Methodist Church. Mr. Jones mentions that having the SCLC in Chattanooga would help the city. However, Dr. King couldn't accept Mr. Jones' invitation due to prior arrangements to host the 1965 SCLC Spring Board Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.

Letter from Mary B. Courtney to MLK

Sunday, October 24, 1965
Oklahoma (OK), Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Mary B. Courtney requests Dr. King's help to sell her property. She explains to him that the house has been on the market for three years in St. Petersburg, Florida, and while "several colored people" have contacted the real estate agency with interest, they are dissuaded by the lack of African Americans in the neighborhood. The author suggests that Dr. King contact some of his associates in St. Petersburg to assist in the matter.

The Cultural Crisis

Dr. King quotes Edward Hallett Carr's "Conditions of Peace."

Draft of Statement to TIME Magazine from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement, Dr. King is pleased to know that the President is calling for new civil rights legislation. Unfortunately, the President did not express anything new nor directly address the issue. Dr. King emphasizes the urgent need for the President to demand vigorous civil rights legislation in order to expedite school integration and the right to vote.