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Pamphlet from the Child Development Group of Mississippi

Mississippi (MS), Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Tennessee (TN)

This pamphlet is entitled "Histories Of: Children, Employees, Centers, Community Support." The organization, sponsored by the Child Development Center of Mississippi, is a statewide Head Start program that was organized in the summer of 1965.

Letter from Charles C. Diggs Jr. to the General Motors Corporation

Tuesday, July 18, 1967
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI

In this letter, Congressman Charles Diggs of Michigan asks Mr. Louis Seaton of General Motors for his comments in regards to automobile dealerships. The Congressman then points out that General Motors is the only one of the "Big 3" automobile companies that has not taken initiative in having a Negro franchise holder.

Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

Letter from MLK to Herbert Lamont

Wednesday, August 23, 1967
California (CA)

This document contains a small series of responses between Dr. King and Herbert Lamont. Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Lamont's moral support, while Lamont affirms Dr. King's sentiments on peace and justice.

Telegram from Bishop Ljungberg Dean Zetterberg to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden, Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA

Bishop Ljungberg Dean Zetterberg writes Dr. King on behalf of the Cathedral in Stockholm congratulating him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to attend a peace service.

Two Americas

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

This essay highlights the realities of poverty stricken aliens in an affluent society. Through its examination of Negro-white relations, urban riots, and the War on Poverty, the author insists that the nonviolent struggle for civil rights must continue.

Letter from Malcolm X to MLK

Wednesday, July 31, 1963
New York, NY

Malcolm X invites Dr. King, along with other Negro leaders, to give an analysis and a solution on the current "race problem" at a rally in New York on August 10th.

Letter from Matilda Ressy to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Matilda Ressy sends her condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Mrs. Frank Summers to SCLC

Monday, April 9, 1962
Iowa (IA)

Mrs. Frank Summers sends contribution to SCLC and wishes to pass on the March SCLC Newsletter.

Letter From Lillian Gilhertsen to MLK

Wednesday, June 26, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Lillian Gilbertson sends Dr. King some renewals after being prompted by Chauncey Eskridge. She also requests Dr. King's response to the issue.

Letter from Gino Gullace to MLK

Wednesday, December 1, 1965
New York, NY, ITALY

Dr. King is asked to participate in a worldwide survey on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life After Death." The survey is sponsored by OGGI magazine a weekly publication in Milano, Italy.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967
London, England, Atlanta, GA, Stockholm, Sweden, Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference in Stockholm, Sweden surrounding the issue of peace and the Vietnam War. Duff is an official with the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. She thanks Dr. King for meeting with her in San Francisco, California and urges him to attend the conference in Stockholm.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Greenwood, MS, Memphis, TN, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), New Hampshire (NH), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

Letter From Walter R. McCall to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Morehouse School of Religion Director Walter McCall asks Dr. King for a contribution to purchase a piano that will be presented to Morehouse School of Religion.

Letter from Committee on Racial Justice

Sunday, February 11, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

In this letter, the Committee on Racial Justice provides update on their activities and encouragement.

Statement by MLK on Perjury Charges

Wednesday, February 17, 1960
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), New York (NY)

Dr. King addresses his indictment for perjury supposedly related to improperly filed Alabama state tax returns. He points out that the tax auditor who assured him that his returns were accurate is the person bringing the charges. He proposes a group of distinguished citizens to review his books and report their findings and concludes by stating that his conscience is clear.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, June 2, 1967

Ms. Badeker informs Dora McDonald that three copies of a contract with Econ Verlag are enclosed. She instructs that Dr. King is to sign and return the copies in order to further the German-language rights to "Where Do We Go from Here?"

Letter from Everett McKinley Dirksen to MLK

Monday, July 6, 1964
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Everett M. Dirksen expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter and informs him of the satisfaction he received in being an asset in solidifying the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on social ethics from the Book of Nahum.

Letter from Steve Delaney to William P. Lampkin

Monday, August 9, 1965
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

Steve Delaney, Assistant New Director for WSOC, writes William Lampkin regarding Dr. King's visit to Montreat, North Carolina. Delaney thanks Lampkin for providing updates about the visit and also asks for additional information about Dr. King's planned speech.

Problems of Whitehead

Dr. King discusses the problem of metaphysical dualism as presented by philosopher Alfred North Whitehead. Dr. King reviewed much of Whitehead's work while at Boston University and later quoted him in his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

Letter from Senator Clifford P. Case to MLK Regarding Poll Taxes as a Condition to Vote

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

New Jersey Senator Clifford Case informs Dr. King that he feels strongly about the elimination of poll taxes as a condition to vote, and he will do his best to push through a provision abolishing these taxes.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

The author writes Dr. King and questions his motives for speaking so "rashly" against the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Victoria Bellard to MLK

Sunday, May 6, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA)

Bellard invites Dr. King to speak on behalf of voting rights and awareness. The event will host members of The Cordelia Green Johnson Beauty Forum. This displays the level of concern at the grassroots.

Telegram to Dr. King about Vietnam

Monday, April 10, 1967
California (CA), Georgia (GA)

The Magee Volunteers for International Developement have communicated with Dr. King regarding the international projects within Vietnam.

Letter from Philip M. Weightman to MLK

Friday, January 3, 1964
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC), Atlanta, GA

Philip Weightman invites Dr. King to attend the AFL-CIO Committee on Political Education's conference at the Dinkler Plaza Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia. Weightman also briefly explains what will be discussed at the conference.

Letter from Fran to Dr. & Mrs. King

Berkeley, CA, San Francisco, CA, California (CA), Ohio (OH), Indiana (IN)

Fran writes Dr. and Mrs. King to thank them for their hospitality during her stay at their home.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Sunday, April 1, 1956
New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Chester, PA, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."


Citing two sources concerning war, Dr. King notes the opinions of Dr. Charles W. Mayo and John M. Fletcher. Dr. Mayo believes that it is impossible to abolish war, as "war is part of our human inheritance," while Fletcher takes the opposite view in his book "Human Nature and World Peace."

Man (John Scotus Eriugena)

Dr. King outlines Erigena's theory of how the current state of complexity in the universe came about.