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"CHINA"

Ritschl (God)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl’s “The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation.”

Letter from Tom Edward Ross to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Tom Edward Ross informs Dr. King of a piece of artwork he created of Dr. King. An effort to publish the piece in the Houston Chronicle was unsuccessful. Ross seeks Dr. King's assistance in promoting the sale of the piece.

Letter from MLK to Kjell Eide

Tuesday, October 10, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King apologizes to Mr. Eide for postponing his visit to Moscow. The Reverend postponed the trip due to the election of a Negro for mayor in Cleveland. Dr. King is hopeful that his visit can be rescheduled for mid-November.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. S.C. Njonjo

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

Dora McDonald responds to Mr. Njonjo's invitation for Dr. King to attend Kenya's Independence Celebration. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Njonjo that Dr. King is happy to accept the invitation.

Note Cards on God

Dr. King's writes on the possibility of finding God from the First Book of Chronicles.

People In Action: Literacy Bill Dies

Saturday, May 26, 1962

Dr. King shares his disappointment with the Senate vote that stopped the 1962 Voting Rights Bill, then known as the Literacy Bill. The bill would have eliminated the literacy tests that Dr. King believed were used to keep African-Americans of all education levels from qualifying to vote.

Telegram from Memphis Sanitation Workers' to MLK

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Members of the Memphis Sanitation Workers' Strike express an urgent need for Dr. King to travel to Memphis in order to aid them in their crusade.

Letter from Alan Geyer to W. L. Harriford

Monday, June 30, 1969

Alan Geyer informs W. L. Harriford that they do not have reprints of Dr. King's article from the October 8, 1958 issue of The Christian Century. However, Mr. Geyer has enclosed an excerpt from the book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Sin

Dr. King cites a scripture from the "Book of Isaiah" referencing the universality of sin.

Morality

Dr. King documents a quote from British statesman John Morley regarding the morality of war. Dr. King refers to the quote, taken from Morley's publication "Recollection," as a "grand, potent monosyllable." Following the citation, Dr. King comments, "This is an agnostic talking."

Note to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964

In a brief note, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of an enclosed British publisher's catalogue for his review.

Letter from Rev. O. Tregelles Williams to MLK

Friday, February 10, 1967

Rev. Williams invites Dr. King to appear on a weekly BBC religious television program entitled "Meeting Point" during his visit to Wales in Great Britain.

Permission to Include King's New York Times Article in College Textbook

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Phillip O. Foss, Chairman of the Political Science Department of Colorado State University, seeks Dr. King's permission to include his article "Civil Right No. 1 - The Right to Vote" in a college textbook. Foss is preparing the textbook "Major Issues of Our Time", to be published by Wadsworth Publishing Company.

Letter from D. F. Lewis to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

D. F. Lewis, a member of the County Line Missionary Baptist Association, commends Dr. King for "fighting on the Lord's side." The organization contributes to the SCLC to continue the fight against racial injustice in the United States.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Book Autographs

Friday, August 28, 1964

With this letter Joan Daves sends three copies of "Why We Cant Wait" to Ms. McDonald requesting them to be autographed by Dr. King and returned to the specified recipients.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

Church Program of the Installation of Rev. A. D. Williams King

Sunday, March 18, 1962

This program details the installation services of Reverend A. D. Williams King at The First Baptist Church of Ensley, Alabama. A number of community and church leaders, including his older brother, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rev. Ralph Abernathy, welcome the young pastor and his family to his new pastorate position.

Poor People's Campaign

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Dr. King is touring the nation to meet poor people in an effort to expose their living conditions. He also wants them to join the campaign to fight for better housing and jobs.

Letter from Lonnie MacDonald to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Lonnie MacDonald, a friend of the King family, encloses a song that she has written for Dr. King. She writes that the song was inspired by his commitment to freedom as reflected by his recent actions in Birmingham, Alabama.

MLK on Student Sit-Ins

Friday, April 15, 1960

Dr. King applauds the students participating in sit-in demonstrations and states that the leaders must develop a strategy for victory. He suggests topics for discussion including: creating an organization, a nationwide selective buying campaign, training for jail not bail, further exploration of nonviolence, and taking the freedom struggle into every community without exception. These suggestions led to the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Telegram from Charles Evers to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

This telegram, from board members of MAP, expresses their dissatisfaction with Dr. King's comments regarding refunding efforts of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

Telegram from Robert F. Kennedy to Wyatt Tee Walker

Monday, September 24, 1962

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Wyatt Tee Walker regarding the progress of the SCLC. Kennedy believes that the right to vote will eliminate "continued discrimination and injustice."

Appeal from Wyatt Tee Walker for Albany Support

Wednesday, July 25, 1962

Following the arrests of Dr. King and three others who held a prayer vigil at the Albany, Georgia City Hall, Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker issues this appeal for support from those active in the civil rights movement. He calls for telegrams to be sent to federal, state, and local officials, prayer vigils, and the wearing of black armbands.

Letter from Nancy Claytor to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966

Nancy Claytor requests Dr. King's permission to use lines from "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" for the publication "The Methodist Student V-VI."

Telegram from N. K. Steele to MLK

N. K. Steele, on behalf of Bethel Baptist Church, offers prayers to Dr. King during his stay in the Care County Jail in Americus, Georgia.

Letter from Claudette Holston to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Claudette Holston writes Dr. King expressing the plight she has faced as a black woman in Michigan and Georgia. She asks Dr. King, "how would you feel if I was your daughter or wife?" and strongly urges him to write back.

Telegram from Russell Tuten to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Russell Tuten writes Dr. King expressing his support in extending Voting Rights and complete citizenship to all Georgia residents. Tuten states, "Georgia should be commended for its progress in conforming to the laws of the land."

Irresistible Grace

Dr. King notes the meaning of irresistible grace.

Letter from Robert Birley to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Robert Birley invites Dr. King to give an address at a program in London. Mr. Birley informs Dr. King of the four topics that will be discussed and requests that Dr. King address the topic of racial discrimination.