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MLK at his 36th Birthday Celebration

This series of photographs depicts Dr. King celebrating his birthday with family and friends.

Adverse Postcard to MLK

American Opinion illustrates a propaganda postcard of Dr. King that accuses him of being a communist. The photo on the postcard was taken at the Highlander School in 1957 which trained leaders in nonviolent passive resistance.

Document Cover Page

Monday, January 15, 1968

This document, dated January 15, 1968, from Johnson Publishing Company is a cover page titled "For Dr. King."

Letter to Robert F. Kennedy from Dora McDonald

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Senator Kennedy to inform him that his recent letter to Dr. King came in his absence. She states that the letter will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return to the Atlanta office.

Justice Harlan Concurring

This newspaper article discusses John Marshall Harlan's dissent with the case of "Plessy vs. Ferguson," and how Harlan was not acknowledged when the case was overturned.

Adverse Letter from R. Johnson to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

R. Johnson writes to Dr. King wishing physical violence against him. The author refers to Dr. King as "Big Mouth."

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Thursday, February 4, 1965

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

MLK Press Statement Regarding Riots in Los Angeles

Friday, August 20, 1965

In this statement to the press, Dr. King comments on the Watts Riots that took place in Los Angeles, California. He further discusses the economic, social and racial inequalities that he feels were the cause of the violence.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Letter from James R. Smith to MLK

James R. Smith, the director of the Youth Christian Education Department of Athens Community, inquires if Dr. King can support his program by giving a donation.

Operation Breadbasket: A Statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Dr. King announces an agreement made with Pick-n-Pay Supermarkets that will open numerous jobs for the Negro community. The

Letter from Paul R. Trumpler to MLK

Friday, May 25, 1962

Paul Trumpler writes Dr. King expressing how he and his wife are pleased to have the chance to support Dr. King's work. They believe in Dr. King's ideas regarding racial issues and solutions. Trumpler encloses a check written out to Dr. King so he can use the money as he designate.

Letter from Oral Roberts to MLK

In this letter, noted evangelist Oral Roberts thanks "my dear partner" for making possible a trip to Vietnam and encloses a special report on the mission. Roberts conducted more than 300 crusades on six continents during his ministry.

Knox, John

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on John Knox.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Kjelle Eide

Monday, January 29, 1968

In this letter Dr. King is expressing regret to Kjell Eide for the continued difficulty in organizing the peace mission. He currently aims to focus on the organizational plans for domestic issues, but would still consider a proposed alternative.

Order of Commitment

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

An Order of Commitment was issued for Dr. King on October 18, 1967 following a conviction for contempt of Court. The charge stemmed from a matter dating back to the 1963 Birmingham campaign. He was sentenced to five consecutive days in Jefferson County Jail, the famed location where "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was conceived.

Letter from Charles T. Dubin to MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Attorney at Law, Charles T. Dubin writes Dr. King to express his approval of the nonviolent practices of the SCLC, and assures Dr. King of the legal effect on the American judicial system. Dubin closes by imploring that Dr. King does not place himself in jeopardy and danger of life and limb.

Letter from David Cassat to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966

Mr. Cassat, Treasurer for the National Council of Churches, informs Dr. King about the benefits of the organization's Gift Annuity Program. He also encloses a brochure that outlines the various details of this innovative initiative.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Letter from James Farmer to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Chairman J. Farmer gives Dr. King a report from the National Advisory Committee of CORE.

Letter from Christa Beer to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965

Christa Beer, a student at the English Institute of Frederick-Schiller University of Jena in East Germany, informs Dr. King that she is writing her final paper on his works in civil rights. She explains the lack of resources at her university and asks that he send her information to aid her in her research.

Letter from Norman R. Snook to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Mr. Norman Snook of the United Christian Center invites Dr. King to come preach at the Ohio State University United Chapel.

Telegram from MLK to Berry Gordy

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Dr. King congratulates Berry Gordy, Jr. for being awarded the Business Achievement Award from the Interracial Council for Business Opportunity.

Letter from Sue M. Stiles to MLK

Sunday, May 24, 1964

Sue Stiles writes Dr. King to assert her viewpoints and beliefs according to her childhood and upbringing. In expressing these truths, Stiles affirms her support in Dr. King's practices in human rights and encloses a financial contribution.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

SCLC Board Meeting

Tuesday, September 29, 1964

This is the agenda for a board meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Savannah, Georgia.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

The Negotiating Committee and Housing

Thursday, May 12, 1966

This statement by the Negotiation Committee lists several improvements made to an African American housing community. The Committee explains that the changes are only on a trial basis and therefore, the community will still picket until permanent changes are made.

Christian Social Philosophy

Dr. King focuses on the interrelatedness of Christian social philosophy, Christian ethics and theology. He argues for the rejection of theology that has no social ethics and also contends that ethics must be dynamic.

What Is Man?

This is one of several documents where Dr. King explores the nature of "man." He considers the question "what is man?" to be a timeless concept that "confronts any generation." Dr. King's analysis incorporates Biblical and Shakespearean texts, among other notable references.