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Information about Poor People's Campaign

VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

The Poor Peoples Campaign asserts that it will demand decent jobs and income for poor Americans of all races and ethnicities. Furthermore the Campaign vows to address constitutional and moral rights, along with the rights of exploited immigrants.

Justice Versus Injustice

EGYPT

Dr. King explains that the power that establishes justice also generates injustice. He also references an ancient Egyptian story "The Eloquent Peasant" and James Henry Breasted's "The Dawn of Conscience."

Letter from Helen Knox to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
California (CA), New York (NY)

Mrs. Knox acknowledges receipt of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" and briefly discloses details of her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement in Harlem.

Letter from George A. Wiley to Rev. Andrew Young

Monday, March 25, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

George A. Wiley writes Reverend Andrew Young and other staff of the SCLC regarding National Welfare Rights Organization's (NWRO) participation with the Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eliot Stadler

Monday, June 22, 1964
St. Augustine, FL, Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN)

Dora McDonald communicates the traveling details to Eliot Stadler regarding his temporary staff placement in the SCLC.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Saturday Review

Monday, May 11, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, wrote Dr. King to gain insight on his preference for a sentence revision to appear in his book "Why We Cant Wait."

Martin Luther King....At Communist Training School

Monday, June 17, 1963
Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Tennessee (TN)

This advertisement printed in the Augusta Courier accuses Dr. King and several constituents of communist involvement.

White House Invitation to Signing of Voting Rights Act

Thursday, August 5, 1965
Washington, D.C.

This telegram from The White House invites Dr. King to the U.S. Capitol for the signing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Grand Hotel Reservation for MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Oslo, Norway

This reservation request was sent to Grand Hotel to establish accommodations for Dr. King and his associates during the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies. One of the drafts of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech was scripted on Grand Hotel stationary.

Draft Statement of Reverend Dr. MLK Jr.

New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This statement, not written in Dr. King's hand, responds to Joseph Alsop's syndicated column in the New York Herald Tribune. Dr. King clarifies that SCLC has no affiliation with the Communist Party. He also states the SCLC has not continued a relationship with Jack O'Dell since he was relieved of his responsibilities.

Letter from C. B. Kelley to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Ohio (OH), Massachusetts (MA), Cincinnati, OH, VIETNAM

C. B. Kelley shares his disagreement with Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

Letter from Edwin Fenton to MLK about permission to use Marchi on Washington speech

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Edward Fenton, Co-Director, Social Studies Curriculum Development Center at Carnegie Institute of Technology writes to request permission to duplicate some excerpts from Dr.King's speech in Washington during the summer of 1963 without fee. Operating under a grant from the United States Office of Education, the Center is developing new courses of study and writing materials to teach social studies inductively to able students in grades nine through twelve.

MLK to the Second Precinct Clergymen's Association

Thursday, March 26, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King gives a statement to the Second Precinct Clergymen's Association in Washington, D. C. regarding voter registration and the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts, "I understand that voter registration here has reached a mark just short of 170,000."

God

Dr. King expresses the power of God as being infinite beyond comprehension of man.

Letter from Mrs. Gossett to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Kansas (KS), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Gossett responds to Dr. King's "Showdown for Non-Violence," an article in Look magazine. She compares welfare and social security to subsidies received by the agricultural, railroad and mining industries. She also encloses an editorial from her local paper that mentions Dr. King.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."

Letter from Kenneth Opp to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Kenneth Opp requests information from Dr. King relating to the Time Magazine 'Choice 68' initiative.

Transformed Nonconformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, FRANCE, CHINA, North Carolina (NC), GERMANY, VIETNAM

Dr. King discusses the importance of not conforming in a sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the hardships and the benefits that come with being a transformed non-conformist.

Letter from MLK to Fellowship Baptist Church

Friday, May 5, 1967
Chicago, IL

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude for the contribution made by the Fellowship Baptist Church in Chicago, Illinois to the SCLC while explaining what the contribution is envisioned to accomplish and what the SCLC has already accomplished.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee on the issues of civil rights, segregation, and voters registration. He urges the party to join the crusade for social justice and equality for all.

Letter from Kent Bach to MLK

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
VIETNAM, Berkeley, CA

In this letter Kent Bach requests Dr. King's endorsement of "Lights On For Peace." Kent Bach plans to run a full-page ad in the New York Times expressing his objection to America's military involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles P. Forbes

Friday, March 29, 1963
Illinois (IL)

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald thanks Charles P. Forbes for sending the report on the MIA Institute.

John Cowles Views on Asia

Dr. King records the views of John Cowles, chairman of Look magazine and president of the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. Cowles stated that the US is losing its grip on "the minds of men" worldwide, thanks in part to the US' inability to express sympathy for the Asian community after World War II.

Letter from Eugene Wolfe to MLK

San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL

Eugene Wolfe, Executive Director of the Council for Civic Unity, forwards Dr. King a check for SCLC from various religious and civic organizations in San Francisco.

Letter from Emily Fortson to Andrew Young

Saturday, February 25, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA)

Emily Fortson of Concreta Tours Incorporated sends Reverend Andrew Young an itinerary for an upcoming conference. Fortson also requests several materials to be included in a letter being formed to invite Dr. King to the conference.

Letter from Mercedes L. Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Pennsylvania (PA)

Nine year old Mercedes Lynne Johnson writes Mrs. King to offer her condolences and prayers following the assassination of Dr. King.

Telegram from Roselle Siegal to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Roselle Siegal extends her appreciation and moral support of Dr. King by means of this Western Union telegram.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Oliver Kannon

Wednesday, July 11, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Kannon that Dr. King will be unable to accept the Easton NAACP's invitation to speak.

Transformed Noncomformist

Friday, November 1, 1957

Dr. King delivered this sermon in November 1957 while serving as the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. In the sermon, Dr. King discusses the Christian dilemma of being "a citizen of two worlds: the world of time and the world of eternity." He situates the experience of black people in America within this dichotomy, and asserts that Christians must not conform to the world of mass opinion when it lacks Christian virtue, but must assume nonconformity.

Paint

Noting the vastness of the sky and "heavens," Dr. King comments on the Earth, stars, and surrounding planets.