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SCLC Mail Log: March 4, 1968

Monday, March 4, 1968

This mail log lists the names of people and organizations sending correspondences to several SCLC staff members.

Ebony: Advice For Living

Thursday, May 1, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

Nietzsche

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche.

Note Card on Hugo of St. Victor

This note card concerns Hugo of St. Victor's dealings with theology and mysticism.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Louisville, KY

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

Commencement Ceremony at Boston University

This photograph shows a commencement ceremony at Boston University in June of 1959.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington Expressing Concerned About Vietnam

Saturday, February 17, 1968
New York, NY

Huntington expresses deep concern regarding the Vietnam War. Huntington believes that humor and ridicule is a weapon against the war that is being used too little. He urges Dr. King and his supporters to each send a message to the president, and also write a letter to the local paper asking peace-lovers to state a message ridiculing President Johnson. In conclusion, Huntington hopes to gain other peace organizations to join in the Ridicule For Johnson Movement.

SCLC Fall Conference Agenda

Friday, September 30, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Shreveport, LA, Tallahassee, FL, Nashville, TN, Alabama (AL), Orangeburg, SC, Louisville, KY, Louisiana (LA)

This is a tentative program for the SCLC's General Fall Conference to be held October 11th through the 13th in 1960. The program included such keynote speakers as Kelley Miller Smith, Joseph E. Lowery, and a freedom rally led by Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy and Fred Shuttlesworth.

Letter from Donald Keys to MLK

Tuesday, August 31, 1965
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Donald F. Keys writes to Dr. King about Dr. King's invitation to speak at a planned Washington Mobilization on Vietnam. Keys also tells Dr. King that he may have to go to Africa at the time of the meeting, and requests that Mrs. King deliver his address in his absence.

Telegram from Governor Carl Sanders to MLK

Friday, October 15, 1965
New York (NY), Georgia (GA)

In this telegram, Governor Sanders informs Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. that he will not be able to attend Ebenezer Baptist Church's Annual Layman's Day.

I Have A Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), New Hampshire (NH), Pennsylvania (PA), Colorado (CO), California (CA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King delivered the "I Have A Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. Along with Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," it is considered to be one of the greatest speeches of all time.

Letter from MLK to May Edward Chinn

Monday, December 23, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to Dr. May Chinn's letter of support and encouragement. King states, "Our struggle for freedom is often difficult and the moments are often frustrating, but we gain new courage to carry on..."

Symbolism and the Cross

Dr. King records notes on symbolism as the expression of spiritual truths.

Nobel Foundation Code of Statutes

Friday, June 29, 1900
Stockholm, Sweden

This 1900 document sets forth the purpose of the Nobel Foundation as worded in the will of Dr. Alfred Bernhard Nobel. According to these statutes, the Peace Award is for the person who has "best promoted the Fraternity of Nations and the Abolishment or Diminution of Standing Armies and the Formation and Increase of Peace-Congresses."

Letter from Irmgard Svenson

Monday, August 14, 1967
Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA

Irmgard Svenson requests that Dr. King send copies of his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Letter from MLK to James Foreman

Thursday, March 14, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King informs James Forman of SNCC that the SCLC will not be able to "defray the cost of the litigation" concerning Bob Zellner. He explains that a recent benefit event did not raise as much money as expected.

SCLC Fund Appeal from MLK

Selma, AL, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King discusses SCLC's continued priority work in the South. the Los Angeles riots and the need for ongoing voter registration. He makes the point that, "contributions are more than money - they are affirmations of confidence and dedication to democratic change."

Soul Force and Woman Power

This notecard titled Soul Force refers to a Woman Power March to be held on June 19, 1968

Letter from the National Union of South African Students to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

On behalf of the National Union of South African Students at the University of Cape Town and the University Van Kaapstad, Martin West requests Dr. King's contribution concerning race relations to the Nusas Journal. The scholarly journal is the "only real national" organ available to students regardless of "race, religion, or colour" in apartheid South Africa.

Telegram from Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. to the SCLC Board of Strategy

Sunday, March 31, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Just three days before the assassination, Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. asserts that removing Dr. King from the SCLC would be disastrous.

Letter from Edward Crawford to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1963
New York (NY), London, England

Edward Crawford of New York encloses a quotation for Dr. King to keep in his possession. The quotation centers around individuals who continue to be slient about serious issues that matter.

Letter from Senator Birch Bayh to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964
Washington, D.C., Indiana (IN)

Indiana Senator Birch Bayh thanks Dr. King for his note supporting Bayh's vote in favor of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Bayh also thanks Dr. King for his concern regarding Bayh and his wife's recent accident. He includes a handwritten postscript in which he mentions the hope of meeting Dr. King in person.

Letter from Gregory Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968
Des Moines, IA, Iowa (IA)

Eleven-year-old Gregory Williams expresses his admiration and support for Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from F. N. Campbell to Ralph David Abernathy

Washington, D.C.

In this letter F. N. Campbell commends Abernathy for his dignified and effective handling of the first phase of the People's March in Washington, DC. It is his hope to utilize the climate of response following Dr. King's assassination. To this end, he proposes the establishment of a foundation in memory of Dr. King.

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Albany, GA, CUBA

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

Letter to Lucille Withers from MLK's Secretary

Monday, December 3, 1962
New York, NY

Miss Lucille Withers, of Harper and Row Publishing, was the addressee of this correspondence from Miss Dora McDonald. Miss McDonald informed Miss Withers that she enclosed Dr. King's sermon titled "Transformed Nonconformist." The sermon was apart of a compilation of other sermons given by Dr. King, which were formed into his second book "Strength to Love."

Letter from Representative Thomas G. Morris to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

New Mexico Congressman Thomas Morris writes Dr. King to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram requesting Morris' opposition to House Bill 585, which would dismiss five recently elected members. Morris does not indicate his position in the matter.

Letter from Louis Toney to MLK

Saturday, May 29, 1965
South Carolina (SC)

Army veteran Louis Toney attempts to solicit a job with the SCLC, citing military experience, a college degree and ordination as characteristics that qualify him for the job.