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Letter from Cirilo McSween to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967

Cirilo McSween congratulates Dr. King for the reorganization of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Rev. A. A. Ackerman to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1962

Reverend A. A. Ackerman, Pastor of Bethel AME Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can make an appearance and speak at his church.


Dr. King references Voltaire and his views regarding the impact of the style in which one chooses to express himself.

Registration Form for WCLC Assembly Session

Thursday, June 24, 1965

The Western Christian Leadership Conference sends this pamphlet to potential participants and encourages registration for the Assembly Session in July, 1965. Dr. King is featured as the Mass Meeting Speaker.

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK Requesting a Leave of Absence from the S.C.L.C.

Monday, June 13, 1966

Randolph T. Blackwell requests a one-year leave of absence from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to work with Citizens Crusade Against Poverty. Blackwell will assist the S.C.L.C. sister organization with its emerging Southern Rural Development Project.

Letter from Bob Bodie to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Bob Bodie, Choice '68 Chairman at John Brown University, asks Dr. King to send materials about himself for the National Collegiate Presidential Primary. Bodie requests posters, buttons and literature to acquaint the students with Dr. King.

New Housing Developments - West

This outline entails the location, prices, floor plans and descriptions of new homes for Negro families.

Support Letter from

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Donna Breiter conveys her support of Dr. King's work within the Civil Rights Movement. Due to her finances she cannot physically attend marches, but she inquirers of other ways to support the efforts.

Letter from the International Convention of Christian Churches to MLK

Friday, October 7, 1966

The International Convention of Christian Churches communicates their appreciation for Dr. King's participation in the evening panel on "The Churches and the Struggle for Human Freedom, Dignity and Brotherhood." The executive secretary informs Dr. King of the enclosed honorarium for his contribution to this panel discussion.

Quotes on Love

The document, seen here, displays special quotations that focus on the theme of "love." Prominent individuals and philosophers such as: Carlyle, Suard, the Pope and Washington Irving are just a few of the quotes chosen by Dr. King.

Letter From Heather Burke to the SCLC

Sunday, August 14, 1966

Heather Burke informs the SCLC of her upcoming attendance as a student at Vanderbilt University. She wishes to volunteer with the organization.

Telegram from Nathan Cooper to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1960

Referring to Dr. King as a southern fascist, Nathan Cooper telegrams his demands for an immediate two- hour national radio television civil rights debate.

The Christian Church and Communist Atheism

Helmut Gollwitzer, a Protestant theologian, completes this body of work entitled "The Christian Church and Communist Atheism." The author states that, "socialists may be Christians, but Christians must be socialists."

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1964

Attorney General Robert Kennedy invites Dr. King to be interviewed as part of an oral history program on issues and decisions of the Kennedy Administration.

Invitation to Dinner for General Dwight D. Eisenhower

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Dr. King received this formal invitation to attend and be seated on the dais at The Family of Man Award Dinner in honor of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, at the Hotel Astor on 10/28/64.

Gandhi Smarak Nidhi: Its Work and Plans Booklet

This booklet contains information on initiatives being brought to fruition by the Gandhi National Memorial Fund. Dr. and Mrs. King appear in a photo on page eight.

SCLC Participates at Chicago Conference of New Politics

Dr. King asserts that "serious distortions" from the press have defaced the image of the SCLC in regards to the organization's involvement at the Chicago Conference of New Politics. Factually, at the conference, members of the SCLC were the most active and coherent opponents of the resolution in the Middle East. The SCLC perceives that the issue in the Middle East must involve security and development. The political realities and possible methods of improvement within the Middle East are discussed and elaborated upon.

Letter from MLK to William Proxmire

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks William Proxmire for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Invitation from J.G. Kennelly to MLK

Wednesday, April 24, 1963

J.G. Kennelly invites Dr. King to address the Christian Culture Forum during their 1963-1964 season in Hamilton, Canada.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves issued this royalty statement for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

Letter from C.A. Echols to MLK

Thursday, July 1, 1965

C.A. Echols requests a copy of Dr. King's publication "The Time for Freedom Has Come" to be included in his upcoming thesis "Thoreau and Civil Disobedience."

Letter from MLK to Tharon Stevens

Dr. King responds to Mr. Stevens' previous letter and commends his courageous efforts for implementing the 1964 Civil Rights Act in Statesboro. An application to develop an SCLC affiliate in Statesboro is also enclosed.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Saturday Review

Monday, May 11, 1964

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, wrote Dr. King to gain insight on his preference for a sentence revision to appear in his book "Why We Cant Wait."

Letter from Hubert Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Hubert Marshall writes Dr. King enclosing a contribution to the SCLC. Marshall states the Reverend's address in Washington was one of the most moving speeches he has ever heard.

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

Letter from David L. Clark and Charles E. Young to MLK

Tuesday, March 23, 1965

David Clark and Charles E. Young of the University of California Los Angeles write to Dr. King to ask him to speak to the UCLA student body. They express that their students are very interested in the Civil Rights Movement and have planned an entire "Selma Week" to correspond with his speech and raise money for the Selma Movement.

Letter from Roy M. Green to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Green wants Dr. King to read and give an opinion on the three views of the "Black Ghetto" in the October issue of the Atlantic Monthly. Mr. Green states to Dr. King, "Our editors would be most interested in your opinions and comments".

Letter from William Perkins to MLK

This letter comes from a military inmate who makes claim to Dr. King of mistreatment and unjust imprisonment. Private William Perkins requests the assistance of Dr. King prior to writing to his congressman to complain of abuse and a lack of proper medical care.