Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"CHRISTMAS ISLAND"

Ritschl (Christology)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Pathos and Hope

Dr. King writes about his trip to the Mississippi Delta. He reflects on the resolve and spirit of the people, who despite all odds are fighting for social justice and change.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Charles R. Bell Jr. about Beating of a Prisoner

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

In this correspondence, Dr. King offers thanks to Rev. Bell for his letter about the "horrible beating" of a Negro prisoner in Wetumpka, Alabama.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Dora McDonald inquires about receiving additional copies of the Time Magazine issue that featured Dr. King as the Man of the Year. She informs Otto Fuerbringer that Mrs. King's relatives in her hometown of Marion, Alabama were unable to buy copies of the magazine.

Letter from MLK to Dr. A.S. Markham

Thursday, January 21, 1965

Dr. King apologetically informs Dr. Markham that he will be unable to attend an event held in his honor to receive the Brotherhood Society of Beth Shalom 1965 award.

Letter from Carl Albert to MLK

Friday, October 20, 1967

In this letter, U.S. Congressman Carl Albert offers his gratitude to Dr. King regarding a letter he sent to him about problems in the country.

An Evening of Music

Sunday, April 15, 1962

The English family provides Ebenezer Baptist Church with "An Evening of Music" in the spring of 1962.

Letter from Joseph F. McCrindle to SCLC

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Joseph F. McCrindle, President of the Henfield Foundation, encloses a check of $250.00 to SCLC on behalf of the Henfield Foundation.

Letter from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, February 5, 1964

Nelson Rockefeller writes to Dr. King hoping to have lunch with his family at Pocantico Hills. His intent is to raise funds for the Urban League of Westchester County and the SCLC.

Memo From Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, November 16, 1967

Miss Dora Mcdonald provides a brief summary of phone calls to Dr. King and the context of each.

New York Amsterdam News: White-On-White Darien's Open Door

Saturday, December 12, 1964

In this editorial Ms. Gertrude Wilson highlights a teacher exchange program in an affluent White community. This particular program aims to enrich the lives of students by integrating a diverse representation of professionals.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Senator Daniel B. Brewster writes Dr. King to thank him for urging his support for the elimination of the poll tax.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Merrill

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

Dora McDonald replies to Merrill's request that Dr. King nominate nonviolent activist Danilo Dolci for the Nobel Peace Prize. Known as the Sicilian Gandhi, Dolci opposed poverty, social exclusion and the Mafia. Merrill was chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College and King's personal friend.

Letter from Don Edwards to MLK

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Representative Don Edwards of California sends his gratitude to Dr. King for a recent letter. Edwards informs Dr. King that they are currently drafting legislation to amend the Civil Rights Act.

Telegram from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

L. M. McCoy telegrams Dr. King stating that the Methodist Church of Brazil is eager to have him as the Centennial speaker. McCoy believes that Dr. King can share his wisdom with Brazil leaders regarding the social conditions in America.

Message from the President

Dr. King expounds on the importance of nonviolence and voter registration to the mission of the SCLC.

Monotheism

Dr. King describes monotheism, the belief in the existence of one God, as it compares to Hebrews and Greeks in a civilized world. He quotes Albert C. Knudson from "Religious Teachings of the Old Testament."

Letter from Robert Johnson Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1961

Mr. Smith invites Dr. King to be a special guest at the Annual Men's Day at Salem Baptist Church. He also asks Dr. King to recommend Herbert C. Nelson for appointment as a federal judge.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Frank Kuhlman about Support

In this letter Dr. King expresses his belated gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kuhlman for their letter of support. Dr. King also comments on nonviolence and the war in Vietnam.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Copernicus

Dr. King discusses how the discoveries of renowned astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus and German philosopher Immanuel Kant revolutionized thinking regarding the human mind. The note card also outlines philosophical views originating from the "analogy of two clocks" referencing prominent thinkers Rene Descartes and Gottfried Leibniz.

1964 Election

Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.

Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr. Press Release

Thursday, March 3, 1960

Bayard Rustin announces the formation of the Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr. The Committee was formed in response to charges against Dr. King being filed by Alabama. The Committee intends to raise $200,000 in support of Dr. King and the SCLC.

Legal Brief of Robert Greene

Robert Greene, a mixed race individual from New York, appeals his case to the Supreme Court of the United States. Greene asserts that New York investigators and police conspired to violate his civil rights by means of wrongful arrest and detention, even after his innocence became apparent. Furthermore, as Greene is recognized as indigent, his case proceeds "in forma pauperis," or without the burden of court costs and legal fees.

Lucky to Be an American

An anonymous person tells Dr. King that he has lost his place as the most liked American. The author infers that Dr. King should not look for everything free and work for his success.

Letter from Geraldine Fothergill to MLK

Tuesday, February 5, 1963

Geraldine Fothergill, a mother of seven of Hartford, Connecticut, offers Dr. King an idea about educating African American youths. She suggests that African American families develop a boarding program to house African American students that are accepted at traditionally white colleges distant from home. She also suggests that Dr. King, as a minister, can convince other ministers to support this program through the churches.

Progress

Dr. King writes that progress has to do with value in human life.

Telegram from Marion Barry and Edward Biking to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee extends gratitude to Dr. King for his deep commitment to the concept of nonviolence and a free society while he is incarcerated in the Dekalb County Jail.

Letter from John Reevs Calloway III to the SCLC

Friday, April 5, 1968

Mr. Galloway sends his condolences to the SCLC for the untimely death of Dr. King.

A Tribute to the MLK

Monday, November 30, 1964

Several organizations in Stamford, Connecticut sponsor a tribute in honor of Dr. King. This document outlines the program participants, and lists Dr. King as providing the keynote address.