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"CHRISTMAS ISLAND"

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has spoken to Harper & Row about advertising. She expects that advertisements in "Ebony" and in "The Amsterdam News" will run on July 2nd and 16th.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Monday, April 8, 1963

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

Religious Witness For Human Dignity Booklet

Sunday, May 31, 1964

Religious Witness for Human Dignity seeks the support of members of the Protestant, Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Jewish Communities in the struggle for civil rights.

Letter from Margit Sahlin to MLK

Saturday, October 24, 1964

Margit Sahlin of the Church of Sweden invites Dr. King to a "symposium with prominent and interested Swedes" during his trip to Scandinavia.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Letter from Brenda Sepulveda to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A student from New York writes this letter of condolence to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Comte (A Criticism by Dr. R. flint)

Dr. King quotes a statement from Robert Flint's "Philosophy of History in France and Germany" which criticizes French philosopher, August Comte. Robert Flint was a Scottish philosopher.

Letter to MLK from Marie King

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

Marie King writes to express her support for Dr. King.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Telegram from Joseph Anderson to MLK

Joseph Anderson urges Dr. King to "call forth a day of prayer" to ease the uproar, most notably overshadowing such U.S. cities as Detroit and Newark during the long, hot summer of 1967.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

Letter from William Mahoney to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

William Mahoney asks Dr. King for his input on a SCLC monthly publication in which he is attempting to create. The publication would seek to educate the public on social, economic, and political problems African Americans endure.

Letter from Ian Robertson to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966

Ian Robertson, President of the National Union of South African Students, writes Dr. King on behalf of the organization. He addresses the lack of acknowledgement to their previous letter and requests a copy and recording of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Carroll Whittemore to MLK

Friday, September 25, 1964

Carroll Whittemore inquires about a promotion for Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" to be distributed to roughly 60,000 clergymen. He further requests a photograph of Dr. King to be used for publicity purposes, in a gallery of outstanding ministers.

Letter from Clarence Portericker to Mrs. King

Clarence Portericker, a student in New York, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King hoping that Dr. King's dream will come true.

Progressive National Baptist Convention Sixth Annual Session

Monday, July 31, 1967

This news release outlines the events and participants for the Sixth Annual Session of the Progressive National Baptist Convention to be held in Cincinnati, Ohio. The theme of the conference is Spiritual Renewal in a Decaying Society.

Prayer Support from Canada

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Carl H. Woodbeck, publisher of Africa Speaks, writes a letter of support and prayer to Dr. King.

Letter from Anna Gallaspy to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966

Anna Gallaspy, Production Director of the Immanuel United Church of Christ in Los Angeles, extends an invitation for Dr. King and members of the SCLC to review their outline of a youth festival pilot program.

Statement Condemning Judge Elliot's Restraining Order

Sunday, July 22, 1962

Dr. King and Dr. William G. Anderson, President of the Albany Movement, denounce US District Judge J. Robert Elliott's temporary restraining order that prevents them from staging protests. They add that, out of respect for the federal judiciary, they will abide by the order and appeal to a higher level. They assume the order applies only to the named defendants and colleagues and not to the entire community and will not discourage others from taking action. Judge Elliott’s injunction was later overturned by the Fifth Circuit US Court of Appeals.

Royalty Statement for a Payot Published Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement for a French-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" documents royalties earned in 1966.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to John H. Calhoun

Dr. and Mrs. King deliver their condolences for the recent passing of Mason, brother of John H. Calhoun. The Kings informs Mr. Calhoun that he is not alone in his hour of mourning and that the community is also suffering this great loss.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, February 3, 1967

J. Campe informs Dr. King of the expenses for the Spanish pocket book edition of "Why We Can't Wait" and encloses a royalty check.

Appeal from the Circuit Court of Cook County

Defendant-Appelant Frank Ditto filed for an appeal against the City of Chicago after feeling he was unconstitutionally denied a trial by jury. Ditto, Dr. King, and others were on trial previously for their demonstrations in the Chicago, Illinois.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

As Dr. King reflects on his acceptance of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, he draws a parallel to the American Negroes' nonviolent approach to civil rights and the people of India, Africa, and elsewhere throughout the world. King argues that "humanity's desperate need for peace and progress to move into the truly civilized world of the future" will ultimately derive from adherence to non-violence.

Telegram from MLK to Fred Shuttlesworth

Dr. King provides support and encouragement to Rev. Shuttlesworth.

Letter from MLK to Joyce Armstrong

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to Joyce Armstrong, a student at Central High School, regarding her concerns on equality. Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation and states, "it is gratifying to us to know that so many young people are dedicated to the cause of Freedom."

His Attitude Toward Higher Criticism

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Immanuel Kant's book "The Preface to the First Edition.

Program for the SCLC Mass Meeting

Wednesday, October 1, 1958

This program is for a SCLC Mass Meeting that took place, at the Norfok Municipal Auditorium, on October 1, 1958.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

This was sent to Dr. King from Abram Eisenman, who is running for President of the United States in 1968. He asks for Dr. King's support in running for president and presents his case on why he should be president.

Bifurcation of Nature

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead's views on the bifurcation of nature into apparent and causal nature in "The Concept of Nature."