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"CHRISTMAS ISLAND"

Jainism

Dr. King notes a quote regarding the philosophy of Jainism.

Letter from Elaine Hinde to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH)

Elaine Hinde inquires about materials and information from Dr. King in regards to Choice '68.

Pilgrimage to Nonviolence

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King's essay "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" provides a replete account of the thinkers, ideas and sentiments responsible for his pledge to nonviolence.

Mid-Winter Extra Session of the Progressive National Baptist Convention

Thursday, January 11, 1968
Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, Missouri (MO), California (CA), New York (NY)

L. Venchael Booth, Executive Secretary for The Progressive National Baptist Convention, sends out this letter and news release regarding the Official Call to the Mid-Winter Extra Session to be held in St. Louis, Missouri in late January of 1968.

Statement to Confront the Conflict in Harlem

Monday, July 27, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. Arthur C. Logan, Chairman of the Board of Directors for HARYOU-ACT, Inc., writes this statement addressing the conflict in Harlem. According to Logan, "the present conflict in the Harlem community is a consequence of a long-standing feeling of powerlessness and its resultant frustrations." Specifically, the unrest in Harlem is attributed to the unreasonable behavior and inadequate training of the Police Department. This statement includes a list of recommendations to help confront the crisis.

Telegram from Elmer J. Holland to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Congressman Holland assures Dr. King that he will "oppose all crippling amendments" to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Letter from Walter Mondale to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter Congressman Mondale writes to Dr. King asking for feedback on the bill he's trying to pass, which is intended to provide government assistance for home ownership.

Letter of Response from Clarence B. Jones to J. Saba Alexander

Wednesday, April 17, 1968
New York, NY, Brooklyn, NY

Clarence Jones responds to Alexander's letter requesting action steps to create an interfaith chapel and memorial library in honor of Dr. King. Jones agrees with the great loss and likewise pledges to continue the work.

Letter from MLK to Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxiliary Members Expresing Thanks for Their Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967
Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA

Dr. King thanks the Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxilary Members for their generous contribution to S.C.L.C. Dr. King acknowledges the impact of such support on improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter from Usher Board of Saint Luke Community Church to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Usher Board of the Saint Luke Community Christian Church invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker at their church.

Citizenship Education Proposal

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ, Montgomery, AL

SCLC's Citizenship Education Program issues a five year proposal for the period between 1965 and 1970. The proposal outlines previous successful activities since the inception of the program.

Peace of Mind or Soul

Dr. King quotes French physiologist Dr. Charles Richet.

Telegram from J.C. Willimas and George Moore to the National Education Association of America

Tuesday, October 24, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Williams writes to the National Education Association of America requesting an immediate investigation take place on behalf of the Atlanta School System. He suggests that discriminatory practices are present.

Letter from James Degener to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966
Indiana (IN), Chicago, IL

Lutheran Church youth advisor James Degener asks that Dr. King assist him in showing a group of teenagers life around the dilapidated side of Chicago. Degener's goal is to expose the young people to the crippling and tragic conditions of the inner city. At the time of this correspondence, Dr. King and SCLC were in the midst of an open housing campaign in Chicago, known as the Chicago Freedom Movement.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King records teachings of German theologian and philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher that Dr. King feels "make his theology a religious psychology."

Letter from Reverend Virgil W. Glanton to SCLC

Saturday, June 18, 1966
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

In this letter, Reverend Virgil Glanton gives a contribution to SCLC and offers support for the Meredith March.

Letter From Harry A. Ploski to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966
New York, NY, Florida (FL), Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Little Rock, AR, Selma, AL, Maryland (MD), Pennsylvania (PA), North Carolina (NC), New Orleans, LA, Memphis, TN, New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA

Harry A. Ploski writes Dr. King concerning a book he and Professor Roscoe Brown have written. Hoping to solicit endorsement, he encloses a copy of the table of contents and an outline of the topics addressed.

Speeches by the Leaders

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISRAEL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Chicago, IL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, GERMANY, Berlin, Germany, Boston, MA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, California (CA), Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Maine (ME), South Carolina (SC), New Hampshire (NH), Colorado (CO), Tennessee (TN)

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

Amsterdam Article

Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Philadelphia, MS, Jackson, MS, Greenwood, MS

This document describes the fight for civil rights in Mississippi in the early 1960's.

MLK Statement on Libel Suit

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding a libel suit. He explains that he has been served papers but is not at liberty to comment.

People in Action: Most Abused Man in Nation

Saturday, March 31, 1962
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

This article by Dr. King, published in his "People in Action" series in the New York Amsterdam News, describes the national and local reaction to the Birmingham jailing of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and J. S. Phifer.

Work Summary of Rachel Davis DuBoise

New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Louisville, KY, Nashville, TN, Columbus, OH, Richmond, VA, Indiana (IN)

This document is a brief work summary for Rachel Davis DuBoise as a member of the Dialogue Department of SCLC covering the periods from November 1965 to October 1966.

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, March 4, 1968
Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Baltimore, MD

This is the SCLC financial report for the week of March 4 through March 8, 1968. Income, disbursements, and bank balances from several banks are included in this document. Expenses from organizational projects, such as Voter Registration, the Washington Project and Operation Breadbasket, are also documented. A list of priorities and outstanding debts conclude the report.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Sunday, April 9, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter addressed to Rev. Martin "Coon" King, the writer--who does not identify himself-- maintains Dr. King is "damag[ing]...the negroes [sic] cause" by focusing on giving them "handouts," as opposed to "improv[ing] their morals."

The Boston Sunday Globe: The Road to Loyalty

Sunday, August 28, 1966
Boston, MA

Justice Felix Frankfurter is quoted by the Boston Sunday Globe to discuss the lack of liberty in history due to repulsive individuals. The American Civil Liberties Union is accused of being communist as well as Jefferey Gordon, a member of the pro-Peking Progressive Labor Party. The article expounds on various organizations and quotes surrounding their political perspective.

Scholarship Essay

Chicago, IL, Wisconsin (WI)

Kathleen Lyons, an artist and student from St. Norbert College in Wisconsin, writes this scholarship essay to solicit funds to attend school in Chicago. In the paper, she recounts her experience with art centered civil rights work in Chicago and Wisconsin in various schools, a Native American reservation and a state reformatory. Additionally, Lyons explains that in the summer of 1966 while doing volunteer work in Chicago, she became involved with "Martin Luther King's freedom movement."

Letter from Lanette J. Campbell

Saturday, March 16, 1968
New York (NY)

Lanette J. Campbell requests information regarding candidates in the Choice '68 presidential primary.

Telegram from Bea Stanley to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

Bea Stanley writes to Dr. King during his confinement at the Jefferson County Courthouse Jail. Stanley informs him that many of his supporters and friends are concerned regarding his health and safety, and also updates him on the progress of one of his publications.

Memorandum

Wednesday, September 7, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN), Little Rock, AR, Montgomery, AL, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New Orleans, LA, Texas (TX), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA)

This memorandum, sent to Dr. King, expresses the need for a convocation between Negro and white Southern leaders. Recent developments, such as peaceful integration of lunch counters and schools, show that whites are respecting equal rights of Negro citizens more.