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Letter from MLK to Rev. Stanley Terry

Wednesday, October 10, 1962

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Reverend Terry of New York for his witness in Albany, Georgia.

History

Dr. King references a quote from St. Paul regarding a theological perspective of history.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rennie Kiah

Friday, July 29, 1966

Dr. King and Dora McDonald express their gratitude for Mr. Rennie L. Kiah's suggestions. Mr. Kiah brings awareness to Dr. King about the "unkempt" property owned by the City of Atlanta. Dr. King attempts to contact the City Manager to clean up the property that is next to Ebenezer Church.

Document Cover Page

Monday, January 15, 1968

This document, dated January 15, 1968, from Johnson Publishing Company is a cover page titled "For Dr. King."

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

Draft of Prayer Given by Dr. King

This document is a handwritten draft of a prayer, given by Dr. King. The prayer thanked God for "gifts of mind with which thou hast endowed us." The date and place, in which this prayer was given, is unknown.

Interview about Refusal to Seat Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

This is transcript of a question and answer period following a news conference at which Dr. King made a statement regarding the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Julian Bond after Bond announced his support of a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) news release opposing the Vietnam War. King led a protest rally to the state house.

The Dexter Echo: Christianity & Curiosity

Wednesday, September 7, 1960

Congregation members and supporters of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama are informed of monthly programming and important updates, including the recent change in pastoral leadership from Dr. Martin Luther King to Rev. Herbert H. Eaton.

Letter from Mr. Matthias Mirschel to MLK

Saturday, June 10, 1967

In this letter Mr. Matthias Mirschel of Kirchliche Hochschule Berlin expresses commitment to Dr. King's stance against American intervention in Vietnam as well as integration for colored citizens. "We ask you not to cease with your endeavors...many people in the USA and all over the world hear your voice and support your campaign," writes Mr. Mirschel.

Letter from Delight S. Gordon to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

Ms. Gordon urges Dr. King to use his influence as a great leader to persuade Negros not to condone the actions of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Heather Davidson to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Miss Heather Davidson invites Dr. King to speak during the University of Western Ontario's Religion-in-Life-Week.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

Sunday, January 1, 1961

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

SCLC News Release: Alabama Primary

This SCLC news release lists African American candidates running for elective office in an Alabama primary.

Letter from AJ Muste to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

A.J. Muste encloses a letter from Cherian Thomas to Dr. King and references a previous telegram he sent congratulating Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter to Jesse Jackson from Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 30, 1966

Dr. King request the attendance of Rev. Jesse Jackson at a meeting that will discuss the distribution of grant funds for a program regarding nonviolence and social change.

Letter from W.O. Gill to MLK

W. O. Gill expresses his gratitude for the generosity that Coretta Scott King extended to him. He then tells Mrs. King that his secretary is sending her a check for $2.00, and that he looks forward to being able to visit with Dr. King. He ends the letter with a quote from the bible.

Kansas City Star Drawing

This editorial cartoon from the Kansas City Star depicts Dr. King at a bar with two bottles labeled "Anti-Vietnam" and "100 Proof." A young girl representing the Civil Rights Movement pulls on his coat and asks him to come home.

Letter from Reese High School Student to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

Ann Renwick, a senior at Reese High School, informs Dr. King of a term paper she is writing about him and requests information regarding his next visit to Detroit. She also expresses discontent with prejudices against Negros in her small all-white town, but is determined to change the mentality of her peers.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Thursday, August 6, 1964

Joan Daves requests clarification regarding Dr. King's schedule.

Letter from Mrs. Phyllis Nissel to MLK

Phyllis Nissel congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She remembers hearing his speech at the March on Washington and appreciates Dr. King's ability to represent the voices of so many.

Letter from Herschel Auerbach to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967

Mr. Auerbach objects to "anti-Semitic and anti-Israel" resolutions adopted at the National Conference of New Politics, at which King was a keynote speaker.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Lucile Giles

Tuesday, December 10, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Lucile Giles that Dr. King will be notified of her books upon his return to the office.

King Family Christmas Card

Thursday, December 1, 1966

The King family sends out holiday greetings with their family Christmas card. The card displays a portrait of the King family along with a holiday message.

The Integrity of Martin Luther King

This letter was written in response to Dr. King's address concerning U.S. involvement in Vietnam. The address was given at the Ford Hall Forum, in Boston, MA. The author speaks to Dr. King's courage and integrity for humanity.

Note from Dora McDonald to MLK

Tuesday, August 21, 1962

In this notice, Dora McDonald informed Dr. King that Rev. Jackson visited the office and that he has a engagement for January 1, 1963.

Letter from Anwar Katib to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967

Anwar Katib, Governor of Jerusalem, writes Dr. King regarding his planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Katib assures Dr. King that he will be well-taken care of and shows sincere appreciation that he plans to visit Jerusalem.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

The State of SANE

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

H. Stuart Hughes, Chairman of the National Committee for a SANE Nuclear Policy, writes this report to the board, sponsors and chapters of the organization. Hughes notifies his readers that SANE's policy making body is being renewed due to newly elected regional and national members. Also, the Board adopted a detailed statement of a strategy, which places top priority on promoting an alternative to President Johnson and his Vietnam War policy. Other events include the update of a successful Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace and guest speaker Norman Thomas.

Letter from the West Chester NAACP to MLK

Monday, October 26, 1964

The West Chester Branch of the NAACP congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Sympathizer to MLK

Writing under a pseudonym, the author suggests that the world is separate because that is the way that God intended it to be. The author pulls text from the Bible to support this idea. The author believes that society was equal with the separation and there is no need for Dr. King to continue his fight.