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Telegram from Women's Auxillary of the Chicago NAACP to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

The Women's Auxiliary of the Chicago Branch of the NAACP informs Dr. King he will be the recipient of their 1966 Humanitarian Award.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Albert Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation" on the place Christ holds in Christianity as its historical founders.

Letter to MLK from Wyatt Tee Walker of New York's Canaan Baptist Church

Thursday, August 24, 1967

Wyatt Walker comments on the positive relations between Jews and African Americans and asks Dr. King to support the new nation of Israel.

The Man Who Was a Fool

The sermon "The Man Who Was a Fool," was published in the June 1961 issue of the journal The Pulpit. Dr. King delivered the sermon in both Chicago and Detroit in early 1961.

Philosophical Work

Dr. King outlines significant philosophical and theological publications from the eleventh to the nineteenth century. Thinkers whose work is referenced include: St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK about Request

Monday, October 26, 1964

Alfred Duckett writes this letter to Dr. King in order to remind Dr. King of his desire to have a magazine article or television special done on him and stresses the need to present Dr. King's role "not only as a civil rights leader, but also as a father, pastor, husband, and administrator of a steadily-growing national organization." Mr. Duckett also presents the terms of a proposed publishing contract, should he wish to become a part of the project.

Radio Sermon Titles and Dates

In this document Dr. King lists a series of radio sermon titles and their respective dates of delivery.

Letter from Peter S. Shults to NAACP

Wednesday, August 25, 1965

Peter Shults writes the NAACP requesting a comment on a postcard he received that depicts Dr. King as a communist. He asks multiple questions regarding the validity of the picture on the postcard.

Letter from MLK to Donald Lincoln Cook

Monday, February 7, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Cook for letter, in which Cook stated his support of Dr. King's stance against the United States military's involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Monday, May 10, 1965

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Letter from Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Pastor Marshall L. Shepard invites Dr. King to the Dedication Service for the Mount Olivet Village Corporation in Philadelphia.

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to MLK

Friday, June 14, 1963

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to Dr. King congratulatiing him on his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."

B.F. Randolph

B.F. Randolph, African American preacher and member of the South Carolina Legislature, is honored in this statement for his work against racial discrimination. The documents states that Mr. Randolph fought for the words 'irrespective of race and color,' to be included in the Bill of Rights.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

Monday, December 11, 1961

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Letter from Muriel N. Bishop to MLK

Saturday, November 2, 1963

Muriel N. Bishop, President of the Manitoba branch of Voice of Women, invites Dr. King to "address a public meeting" in Winnipeg at his earliest convenience. She expresses their interest in learning about his philosophy and efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Memorandum from Theodore E. Brown Regarding 1968 Trip to Nigeria

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Theodore E. Brown, the director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, reports the results of his recent trip to Nigeria to members of the Call Committee.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1957

Vice President Nixon writes to Dr. King concerning the efficiency and effectiveness of the Civil Rights Bill. He expresses his gratitude for a previous correspondence from Dr. King and ensures his continued advocacy of civil rights legislation.

Telegram from MLK to Elijah Muhammed

Monday, August 14, 1967

Dr. King commends Muhammad Ali's conscientious objection to the Vietnam War. He encourages Elijah Muhammed to convince Ali to speak at the upcoming Tenth Annual Convention of SCLC.

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

Public Statement by the Albany Movement

Tuesday, January 23, 1962

The statement from the Albany Movement addresses issues of racial injustice and stresses the importance of equality for all.

Man (Sin)

Dr. King writes about Jeremiah's loss of confidence in man, reflecting on the biblical passage Jeremiah 9: 4-6.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ferre's view on religion.

Letter from Sture Stiernlof to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Arbetet magazine's foreign editor, Sture Stiernlof, requests an interview with Dr. King for a "series of articles about the negro movement" that will be published in Sweden's most popular magazine, "Vi," as well as in Arbetet. Additionally, Stiernlof will use the materials for a book.

SCLC Board Meeting

Tuesday, September 29, 1964

This is the agenda for a board meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Savannah, Georgia.

U.S. News and World Report: Is Insurrection Brewing in U.S.?

Monday, December 25, 1967

This article in the U.S. News and World Report features an interview with Richard H. Sanger, known for his experience in the United States Foreign Service and his abilities to recognize the patterns of political violence.

Information on the National Welfare Rights Organization

The National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO) is a nationwide membership organization of welfare recipients. The goals of the NWRO are to develop a system that guarantees adequate income, dignity, justice and democracy.

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Tuesday, June 19, 1962

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

Letter from Prins Gunasekara to MLK

Sunday, December 5, 1965

A member of the Ceylon, Colombo Parliament sends Dr. King two books for inspiration. He encourages Dr. King to continue in the struggle for freedom and hopes that reading the books will renew Dr. King's commitment.