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Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
MEXICO, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King notes Herbert Spencer’s definition of religion.

Draft of Statement "Vote No on State Question 409" by MLK

Oklahoma (OK)

In this draft of a statement, Dr. King discusses the misnomer of 'right-to-work,' stating that the law is against Civil Rights as it is anti-union.

Newspaper Article - South May Hold Best Hope for Martin King

New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, VIETNAM

This newspaper article describes efforts of Dr. King in seeking aid for Negroes in Northern cities slum areas and the formation of a third political party to run in the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Letter from Margery Bray to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Selma, AL, San Francisco, CA

Margery Bray writes Dr. King discussing how the women in America were engaged in similar demonstrations to secure their right to vote. Bray states that legislation is the only way to efficiently change things, and admits that she has recently become an active voter.

Letter from MLK to Robert B. Shaw

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
Washington (WA)

Dr. King informs Mr. Robert B. Shaw that his commitment to the Civil Rights Movement and hectic schedule hindered him from attending the rally.

Letter from Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission to MLK

Friday, June 26, 1964
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

In an effort to reduce the number of school dropouts, Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission requests to include Dr. King in their upcoming brochure. Ducey asks to include Dr. King's photograph and a quotation from a speech he delivered at Chicago's Soldier Field which highlighted academic achievement as a necessity.

Letter from the Committee To Secure Justice for Morton Sobell to MLK

Tuesday, April 10, 1962
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Helen Sobell, wife of Morton Sobell and co-chair of the committee trying to free him, requests that Dr. King write a letter supporting the approval of his parole. She includes an attachment explaining the parole process and contact information for the US Board of Parole.

Letter from John Mannix to MLK

Thursday, July 11, 1963
Washington, D.C.

John Mannix, Chairman of the Program Committee, invites Dr. King to speak for the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

Birmingham, AL

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, June 2, 1967
New York, NY, GERMANY

Ms. Badeker informs Dora McDonald that three copies of a contract with Econ Verlag are enclosed. She instructs that Dr. King is to sign and return the copies in order to further the German-language rights to "Where Do We Go from Here?"

Letter from Rev. J. H. Cole to Roy Wilkins and MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

Rev. Cole writes to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to convey his disgust at the treatment of Negroes in such areas as housing, education, politics and police brutality. He suggests the initiation of a nationwide letter writing campaign to every member of Congress to highlight this treatment and seeks a program that will provide Negroes with jobs skills. Cole also encloses a letter he sent to President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark regarding Congress' disregard of "racial discontent."

Letter from Robert Carter and D. John Heyman to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

The National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing (NCDH) sends Dr. King a report, which examined "where the jobs are and where those who need them most now live." According to the NCDH, the study shows that jobs are not in the same geographic area where Negroes and other minorities live.

Letter and Article from D. Parke Gibson to MLK

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Cleveland, OH, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

D. Parke Gibson sends this article in Race Relations and Industry to Dr. King with the intention of including him in a future issue of the magazine. Those involved in the article agree that progress towards having minorities in leadership roles is on the rise, but not fast enough.

Handwriiten Notecard Regarding Freedom

This notecard written by Dr. Martin Luther King, cites a quote, of Tillich, regarding freedom.

Board of National Missions Writes the Editors of the Washington Post

Monday, October 24, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

George E. Todd, G. H. Jack Woodard, and Joseph W. Merchant send a letter to the Editors of the Washington Post regarding the Mississippi Action for Progress. They claim the organization is a tool for the destruction of the Child Development Group of Mississippi. Additional allegations are made that MAP was an instrument of the governor and legislature of Mississippi to stall school integration.

Immortality

Dr. King highlights a quote from Harry Emerson Fosdick's book "Assurance of Immortality."

Notecard Regarding God

In this handwritten notecard, Dr. King gives a description of God.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Albany, GA

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Letter from Dean Florio to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Dean Florio sends condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Blicksilver

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Blicksilver for his contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges the impact of such support in improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter to the Managers of "Christianity Today'' from Rev Earl E. Josten

Saturday, June 17, 1967
Iowa (IA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In this letter, dated June 17, 1967, Josten writes to the managers of "Christianity Today" to inform them that he cannot comply with their request for names. He is not complying because of the attitude Christianity Today's editor is taking toward Dr. King. Rev. Josten is a pastor at The Methodist Church in Columbus Junction, Iowa. Josten offers prayer to the editor for his "terrible tirade" against King, and states that he will not commend this paper to any more friends if this attitude continues.

Telegram from Mrs. Willie Bass to MLK

Thursday, September 23, 1954
New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

Mrs. Willie M. Bass sent this telegram expressing her hope for Dr. King's speedy recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Letter from MLK to Vincenso Lapiccirella

Thursday, January 14, 1965
ITALY

Dr. King thanks Dr. Lapiccirella for his invitation to participate in a program in Florence, Italy.

Letter from Wilfred Laurier Husband to John B. Oakes of the New York Times

Friday, April 7, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA

Wilfred Husband writes John Oakes, Editorial Page Editor of the New York Times, regarding an article. As a consistent reader of the Magazine, Husband expresses his displeasure with an article that refers to the civil right movement's attention to the war in Vietnam as "wasteful and self-defeating." Husband explains how war and civil rights are inseparable and that stating anything in opposition hurts the cause of the movement.

Letter from MLK to Carl Heassler

Detroit, MI, VIETNAM

In this letter, Dr. King offers words of gratitude to Mr. Heassler for his letter of support. He goes on to critique the War in Vietnam with a nonviolent philosophy.

Letter from P. M. Smith to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
NETHERLANDS, London, England, UNITED KINGDOM, Atlanta, GA

P. M. Smith writes Dora McDonald thanking her on Dr. Ruden's behalf for a letter regarding Dr. King's visit to Amsterdam. Miss Smith references a previous correspondence from Dr. Ruden's informing Miss McDonald of the schedule for Dr. King's visit.

Request for SCLC Information from Frederick A. Meiser Jr.

Massachusetts (MA)

Frederick Meiser tells Dr. King that he has become deeply interested in the SCLC and requests more information about the organization.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Massachusetts (MA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

Letter from MLK to Katherine Gunning

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King thanks Katharine Gunning for sending him a copy of the letter she sent to President Johnson. He urges that "those of us who seek peaece through non-violence make our consciences and numbers known to the men who run our government."