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Memorandum of Agreement for Strength to Love

Monday, April 5, 1965

This document is a signed copy of Dr. King's Memorandum of Agreement for the Spanish edition of "Strength to Love."

Time

Dr. King highlights a quote regarding time. [This quote is attributed to Henry Austin Dobson.]

Letter from Pat Carter to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Dr. King receives a letter from Miss Pat Carter, the public relations director at Katz Radio, thanking him for his address regarding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from Marry Gottesfeld to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Mary Gottesfeld, president of the Community and Social Agency Employees Union, writes Dr. King expressing pleasure in contributing more to Dr. King's organization. She also reminds him of the thousands that are behind his cause.

Telegram from Margit Vinberg to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964

Margit Vinberg invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be the guests of honor at a luncheon in Stockholm, Sweden, sponsored by the Joint Swedish Press Publicistklubben.

Education Versus Religion

Dr. King records notes about the leadership of the intellectual and religious communities from Edwin E. Aubrey's "Present Theological Tendencies."

Jesus

Dr. King records some quotes about Jesus. He quotes a passage that describes Jesus as being the person who brought about a new trust in God. Dr. King also discusses suffering.

Letter from Jim Robert Davis to MLK

Jim Robert Davis tells Dr. King how his presence in Chicago's Lawndale community have caused many of his fellow neighbors to clean their neighborhood. He pens a small but inspriational poem under the subject "The Glory of Blackmen."

Letter from MLK to Senator Howard Cannon

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Democratic Senator Howard Cannon of Nevada for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

"Focus Months" of the New York Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends

Thursday, February 1, 1968

In this document, this New York Yearly Meeting Office unveiled a plan of action for the months of March and April of 1968. The causes they focused on were the Black Power Movement and Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign initiative.

Letter from Earl Smith to MLK about Portugeese Translation of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, November 16, 1966

Earl M. Smith writes to Dr. King requesting permission to translate and publish the book "Strength to Love" in Portuguese. Mr. Smith states that a Fellowship of Reconciliation representative can be responsible for translating.

Letter from Autieve Smith of Revelation Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, August 25, 1964

Autieve Smith writes on behalf of Revelation Baptist Church to express their happiness in Dr. King's acceptance in being a part of their program with the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights Choir. Smith informs Dr. King of the time and place of his address and asks that he provide the committee with the needed information to plan his accommodations.

Letter from MLK to R. P. Bass, Jr.

Thursday, June 16, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Bass for his contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the progress of Negros in the South and explains the importance of supporters.

Partial Transcript: Speech at Guardian Association

Dr. King discusses the events in Montgomery, Alabama as a catalyst in what will become a new world. He stresses that the honor he receives from the Garden Association is not just for him, but for the fifty thousand supporters of the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Letter from Jack Tatum to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 13, 1967

In this letter, Jack Tatum lets Ms. Dora McDonald know that he will be in Atlanta from November 16th-20th, 1967. He states that he would appreciate a meeting with Dr. King and the SCLC executive staff.

Letter from MLK to Rev. M. L. Shepard, Sr.

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. M. L. Shepard for his "generous gift." Dr. King stresses the importance of support from friends like Rev. Shepard for the survival of SCLC. He also informs Rev. Shepard that he will receive material from the SCLC to update his congregation on the progress of work in the South.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author of this letter writes Dr. King concerning the state in which Negroes live. The author feels as if Dr. King only addresses the faults of the white race instead of those of his own race.

Man (His Split Personality)

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

Hegel

Dr. King outlines principles of Hegelian Philosophy regarding the ideal German State.

Telegram from Johnnie McKinney to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Johnnie McKinney telegrams Dr. King to invite him to a fundraising event that is set to occur in Wyoming. McKinney states, "Wyoming needs you to make Reverend Reebs home state a real fortress of equality."

Letter from Representative Ken W. Dyal to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to inform him that he has signed the discharge petition for the Home Rule Bill.

Revised School Desegregation Policies Under Civil Rights Act of 1964

Thursday, December 1, 1966

This document, published by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, gives revised policies for school desegregation. The list of areas covered includes unequal programs and facilities, desegregation of staff and dismissals.

The Relation of Morality and Science to Religion

Dr. King outlines Friedrich Schleiermacher's view on the relation of morality and science to religion.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. James L. Fenner

Friday, July 19, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. James L. Fenner and the faculty members of P. S. 155 for their moral and financial support.

Pantheism Versus Living God

Here Dr. King sketches out his views on "...the Biblical idea of the 'Living God,'" and the substitution of Christ for God "as far as piety is concerned."

Letter from Edward P. Gottlieb to Editor, New York Times

Thursday, November 23, 1967

Edward P. Gottlieb writes to the Editor of the New York Times expressing his concern on racial pride. He begins by stating that racial pride is to be deplored and discouraged. Gettlieb concludes with the notion that an African American will feel free only after he is able to explore his own history and culture so he may take from it what he wants for his personal enhancement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Student Jacquelyn Gravely

Wednesday, March 18, 1964

Dora McDonald refers Allen High School student Jacquelyn Gravely to read "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Crusader Without Violence" for her school assignment. She conveys Dr. King's good wishes towards Gravely's academic career.

Letter from Harry Fleischman to MLK

Tuesday, December 27, 1966

Harry Fleischman suggests a text that may be of interest to Dr. King, entitled "We Are Not Summer Patriots." The text highlights anti-Semitism and other efforts to attain equality.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to Dr. King regarding the 1968 election. He argues against Dr. King's picks for the best potential Republican and Democrat presidential candidates, saying that Vice President Humphrey would have a good chance at the White House if he were to publicly break with President Johnson over the Vietnam War.