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Letter from Rabbi William Herskowitz to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Rabbi William Herskowitz, editor of The Jewish Horizon, asks Dr. King to read and write a review on the book, "Negro and Jew."

Crusade for Citizenship Memorandum

Tuesday, February 4, 1958
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King creates an outline that entails the purpose and goals for the Crusade for Citizenship. Dr. King will deliver this information in a mass meeting to clarify the aims of the SCLC's "crusade." The dual purpose for this sector of the SCLC is to increase the number of Negro voters and to liberate all Southerners. Dr. King further elaborates on the intricacies of the movement.

SCLC Action Committee Meeting

Sunday, February 11, 1968
St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, California (CA), South Dakota (SD), New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

This critical 2-day strategy meeting of key SCLC staff takes place 2 months prior to the projected start of the Poor People’s Campaign in Washington, DC. Dr. King expresses concern that they have not met their target goals for participation. Debate ensues about whether to call off the campaign or push it to a later date, and also whether SCLC should abandon all of its other commitments to ensure the success of this project. Problems and solutions are discussed. Staff assignments made for recruitment of the poor, materials, organizational structure, tentative plan of action, D.C.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

Thursday, December 15, 1966
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

Letter from MLK to Marcia Burke

Tuesday, November 29, 1966
Ohio (OH)

Dr. King appreciates the invitation extended to him to speak for the Ohio Wesleyan University Student Committee on Race Relations, but must decline it.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Inquiring about Dr.King's Professional Tour

Tuesday, February 25, 1964
New York, NY

Mrs.Daves has requested that Mrs.McDonald send information pertaining to Dr.King's lectures and personal appearances to her office as soon as possible.

Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America

Maryland (MD), VIETNAM, Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Greenwood, MS

Stokely Carmichael and Dr. Charles Hamilton are in partnership with SNCC to promote the Black Power Movement. SNCC creates "freedom gifts" to provide the community with the expression of the "humanistic spirit" and goal of the movement. These freedom gifts range from posters, poetry, calendars, and more.

Address for the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This address was delivered by Dr. King at the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights event on May 17, 1962. Dr. King opens by discussing various anniversaries that coincide with the event and represent similar struggles for justice including the Supreme Court school desegregation ruling, the Emancipation Proclamation, and Henry David Thoreau's death.

Acrostic Poem About MLK

California (CA)

Adolf G. H. Kreiss shows his immense support and gratitude for Dr. King's fight for equality with an acrostic poem using the initials of the civil rights leader.

Letter from Alice Parham to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968
Virginia (VA)

Ms. Palhom writes to Dr. King requesting an autograph and personal information about him for her government class.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, Virginia (VA), Massachusetts (MA), New York, NY

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

People In Action: Literacy Bill Dies

Saturday, May 26, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King shares his disappointment with the Senate vote that stopped the 1962 Voting Rights Bill, then known as the Literacy Bill. The bill would have eliminated the literacy tests that Dr. King believed were used to keep African-Americans of all education levels from qualifying to vote.

Letter of Resignation Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Wednesday, November 2, 1966
New York (NY)

Rachel Davis DuBois resigns from the staff of SCLC to help the organization during a time of financial difficulties. Dr. DuBois offers her services in the future whenever needed without compensation.

Telegram from Nicolas Nabokov to MLK

Friday, May 29, 1964
Montgomery, AL, ITALY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA

The mayor of Florence, Italy telegrams Dr. King with hopes that he will accept an invitation to speak at the Mediterranean Colloquium Florence on racial issues occurring in the United States.

Letter from Zabelle Tourian to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
ARMENIA, New Jersey (NJ)

Ms. Tourian commends Dr. King for his efforts against violence and describes the antagonism and discrimination against immigrants when she came as an Armenian to the U.S. in 1903.

Letter from James L. Davis to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967
Texas (TX), New York (NY)

Here a retired minister offers support and good wishes to Dr. King while pleading with him to reconsider his stance on Vietnam.

Holiday Card from Alvino and Betty Figueroa to the King Family

This seasonal greeting card and wedding photograph was sent to Mrs. Coretta Scott King and family. Affectionately addressed to "Corrie," the card provides an update on the couple's employment and future plans. The couple also thanks Mrs. King for the picture she sent of her "two lovely children" last holiday season.

Letter from MLK to Hugh W. Nevin Jr.

Wednesday, November 20, 1963
Rhode Island (RI)

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Hugh Nevin's letter inviting him to speak at St. George's School. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to his full calendar and thanks Mr. Nevin for his nice words regarding his book, "Stride Towards Freedom."

Letter from Jimmie Johnson to MLK

Jimmie Johnson writes to Dr. King to say that while he is a Negro, he does not believe in integration. Johnson does not think there will ever be enough jobs in America for Negroes, and therefore argues for segregation. He asks Dr. King to share this view in his upcoming meeting with President Johnson.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Warren Chippindale

Wednesday, July 27, 1966
CANADA

Dr. King writes to respond to Mr. Chippindale's invitation to have Dr. King speak in Montreal. He states that due to prior engagements, he will not be able to accept the invitation.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King cites a page in "The Personalist" on the existentialism in Kierkegaard's philosophy.

Anonymous Letter to Paul Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
Washington, D.C.

The anonymous author of this letter addresses a "Paul" Abernathy to speak against the March of the Poor People's Campaign after Dr. King's death. The author makes statements suggesting that the efforts on behalf of Abernathy are forced upon the government through such demonstrations.

Dr. King-Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brown's views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from the McKeesport, Pennsylvania NAACP to MLK

Wednesday, March 21, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

The McKeesport Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker at its upcoming Human Rights Dinner.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Letter from MLK to Daniel K. Inouye

Friday, January 24, 1964
Hawaii (HI), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King commends Hawaiian Senator Daniel K. Inouye for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from T. Jansma to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965
NETHERLANDS

The General Secretary of the Baptists in the Netherlands praises Dr. King for receiving an honorary degree from Vrije Unversiteit in Amsterdam and inquires if he is available to deliver any speeches in the Netherlands during the same time period.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Sunday, March 11, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King congratulate Reverend Ralph Abernathy on his birthday.

Letter from George T. Altman to MLK

Monday, September 12, 1966
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Attorney George Altman informs Dr. King of a US District Court order preventing him from taking Dr. King's deposition concerning whether or not people of color should have the same military service requirements as whites. Altman presents the case that people of color were colonial subjects rather than citizens, but the District Court ruled against his position. Altman plans to fight this ruling in an appeal the following month.

New York Mayor Wagner Remarks at Reception

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY), Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner honors Dr. King at a reception following a ceremony where he was presented the Medallion of Honor of the City of New York after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The Mayor especially commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership in nonviolence and the spirit of love, goodwill, and peacemaking that he brings to the struggle for racial justice.