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Letter from MLK to Hugh Daugherty

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Michigan (MI)

In this response letter to Hugh Daugherty, Dr. King extends his deep appreciation for contributions made to the SCLC. The reverend also apologizes for the delay in response.

Dr. King's Schedule October 1967

San Francisco, CA, Los Angeles, CA, Texas (TX), Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ), Philadelphia, PA, Boston, MA, Iowa (IA)

This schedule lists Dr. King's travel itinerary and speaking engagements, October 1967.

MLK Organizes Campaign for Voters

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King announces a "nationwide bipartisan drive to get out the vote on election day." King's campaign charges religious leaders across the USA to help mobilize people to vote for the upcoming presidential election.

War

Citing two sources concerning war, Dr. King notes the opinions of Dr. Charles W. Mayo and John M. Fletcher. Dr. Mayo believes that it is impossible to abolish war, as "war is part of our human inheritance," while Fletcher takes the opposite view in his book "Human Nature and World Peace."

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, June 21, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey informs Dr. King of scheduling complications that will delay his response to Dr. King's request to address the SCLC.

Letter from the Morrissetts to MLK and Mrs. King

Sunday, November 30, 1958
Indiana (IN)

Elizabeth Morrissett wishes the King family a Merry Christmas. Mrs. Morrisset also invites Dr. King to come speak at a Purdue University Convocation.

Western Union Telegram Sent to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from Richard Charles Boone 1965

Friday, November 5, 1965
Texas (TX)

Richard Charles Boone sent Dr. King this 1965 telegram informing him of possible racial hostility in Miami between the black community and Cuban immigrants moving into the city.

Letter from Hano Bailey to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967
Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Hano Bailey praises Dr. King for asking black athletes "to sit out of the Olympics." He informs Dr. King that there are 15 teachers at his University writing letters to their relatives in support of Dr. King's campaign.

Soul

Dr. King quotes Ephesus of Heraclitus' thoughts on soul.

Letter from MLK to Cal David Gleaton

Thursday, December 2, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, California (CA)

Dr. King thanks Rev. Cal Gleaton for his letter in support of the work of the SCLC. Dr. King tells Gleaton that the letter was uplifting and that his contribution to the morale and the spirit of the freedom movement is mostly appreciated by the staff of the SCLC.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to the Editor of New York Times

Friday, June 7, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Clarence Jones writes the editor of the New York Times to comment on a statement made by James Reston. According to Mr. Jones the statement was factually inaccurate and partially paraphrased.

Letter of Support from John Ladd to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, John Ladd expressed support to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Mr. Ladd referenced a desire that his enclosed monetary contribution be directed toward efforts to gain equality for Negroes.

Justification

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl as he discusses the concept of justification and its relationship to sin, guilt and salvation.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Casten, M.D.

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King took the opportunity to address this letter to Daniel Casten, M.D. thanking him for his financial donation to the Mississippi "James Meredith" March. He noted that the march allowed Negroes, in Mississippi, to resolve their fears and fight for justice. A key quotation, in this document, stated to Dr. Casten, "You are a part of that dedicated group of people standing as a beacon light of hope to all of the disinherited men and women of our nation."

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

Washington, D.C.

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

Installation Program for Rev. Kelly Miller Smith

Sunday, September 29, 1963
Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), Ohio (OH), Wisconsin (WI), Atlanta, GA, FRANCE, Chicago, IL, Washington (WA), Nashville, TN, Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN)

This is the program for the installation of the Reverend Kelly Miller Smith as Pastor of the Antioch Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio. Reverend Smith is installed as the Eighth Minister of the historical church, which began in 1893.

Choice 68 Request for Information

Washington, D.C.

The students of the Catholic University of America are participating in the Choice 68' elections and request that Dr. King provide information of himself so that they may further promote his Presidential candidacy.

Mississippi Project

Mississippi (MS)

The Mississippi Project is developed by SNCC which rooted from the evident white supremacy in this state. The organization sought to take action to eradicate the societal restrictions of the American Negro. The summer project will involve voter registration, freedom schools, community centers, and many more sectional projects.

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Friday, December 15, 1967
Michigan (MI), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Michigan State University Associate Professor Robert Green sends Dr. King the final report of the Chicago Adult Education Project funded by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Letter from Henry Lee Gibson to MLK

Detroit, MI

Henry J. Gibson is aware of Dr. King's understanding of "God" and spirituality. Subsequent to a recent surgery, Mr. Gibson is now conscious of the meaning of being "born again." Praying enhanced his knowledge of God's presence in the human race which brought clarity for his perception of the "yellow man." Mr. Gibson requests to meet with Dr. King to further discuss his recent spiritual experiences and newly found wisdom.

National-Zeitung Questionnaire

SWITZERLAND, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

The National-Zeitung of Switzerland asks questions surrounding the current international issues of peace and the Vietnam War.

A Proposal for Unity Day

Tuesday, March 15, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE, UNITED KINGDOM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CHINA, California (CA), San Francisco, CA, GERMANY, COSTA RICA, LEBANON, PHILIPPINES, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, Washington, D.C., JAPAN, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Joseph Polowsky composed a proposal to present to the United Nations for the creation of an April 25th holiday, to be known as Unity Day. This holiday is in commemoration of a conference of the war-time allied nations in San Francisco.

MLK on Brown versus Board of Education

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes notations regarding the Supreme Court's decision in 1954 of Brown versus Board of Education, listing the various positive and negative aspects of that decision. The Reverend closes by stating, "Let us go and unite and be inspired once more..."

Letter from Elisabeth T. Babcock to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 25, 1965
New York (NY)

Elisabeth T. Babcock writes Dora McDonald regarding Dr. King's schedule around May 8, 1965. Babcock desires Dr. King to address high school students "in support of Long Island." Babcock states that maybe Dr. King can help the children display their courage.

Note to Dr. King from JOAN DAVES, New York, NY, dated September 23, 1973

Sunday, September 22, 1963
New York, NY, GERMANY

This note is to request Dr. King's signature on a contract with Oncken for german language edition of Stride Toward Freedom.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Letter from MLK to Tore Lundby

Monday, May 24, 1965
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King informs Mr. Lundby, Editor, he is unable to contribute an article to BLAESUVOLDEINS EFTERRETNINGSTIDENDE.

Clergymen Set Negro Market Wholesaler

Monday, February 7, 1966
New York (NY), ITALY, ISRAEL

This article explains how "three clergymen have organized a wholesale tour service which will cater to the Negro travel market." The service was called "Concreta Tour Service" and it took tourists abroad, focusing on many cities with religious significance.

Letter from MLK to Agnes Mack

Sunday, December 10, 0196
Florida (FL), Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Dr. King sends Agnes Mack a form to complete so that she may receive a copy of the "I have a Dream" speech.

Statement to Confront the Conflict in Harlem

Monday, July 27, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. Arthur C. Logan, Chairman of the Board of Directors for HARYOU-ACT, Inc., writes this statement addressing the conflict in Harlem. According to Logan, "the present conflict in the Harlem community is a consequence of a long-standing feeling of powerlessness and its resultant frustrations." Specifically, the unrest in Harlem is attributed to the unreasonable behavior and inadequate training of the Police Department. This statement includes a list of recommendations to help confront the crisis.