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"I, Too" by Jerry Peace

This document displays the poem "I, Too" by Jerry Peace

Letter from Chas. W. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Chas. Bailey comments on representative Adam Clayton Powell, asserting that he cannot call himself a Christian and that he only escaped investigation because of his race. Bailey also lectures Dr. King for defending Powell.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee is having an event with Dr. King as their guest speaker and special musical performances by artist such as Mahalia Jackson.

Letter from MLK to Dorothy O. Bucklin

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Dr. King graciously declines Mrs. Bucklin's invitation to speak in Green Lake, Wisconsin under the "auspices" of the American Baptist Convention. Mrs. Bucklin serves as Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Society.

Letter from Joseph Matasovsky to MLK

Thursday, April 23, 1964

A member of the Slovak Catholic Sokol expresses their respect for Dr. King's action against the Vietnam War. The author deems Dr. King a "patriot" and appreciates his spiritual profundity, as well as his intellect surrounding national politics.

Congratulations to MLK from Michael Engel

Saturday, December 19, 1964

In this letter dated December 19, 1964, Michael Engel sends his congratulations to Dr.King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize. He also asks for a picture of Dr.King for his scrapbook.

MLK's Transcript from Crozer Theological Seminary

Wednesday, December 6, 1950

In 1948, Dr. King entered Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. Engaging in a sincere quest for knowledge, he sought stimulation in the works of several prominent areas, like philosophy and theology. As a result of his efforts and achievements at Crozer, Dr. King was chosen as the Valedictorian of the graduating class of 1951.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr.

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King responds to the concerns of Congressman Charles Diggs regarding the March on Washington. He encloses a privately distributed memorandum about the march that Dr. King believes will answer the questions Congressman Diggs has about the march. Dr. King also briefly explains the purpose and some logistics of the march.

Letter from Dr. King to anonymous

In a handwritten draft addressed simply to "gentleman," Dr. King expressed gratitude for having received a copy of a study entitled "Civil Disobedience: Morality and the Coming of the Civil War." So impressed with the contents of the book, Dr. King made it available to staff as reference resource.

Telegram from Harold Stassen to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Harold Stassen, President of the American Baptist Convention and former Minnesota Governor, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He states that Dr. King is the most deserving because he tackles the race crisis through non-violent means.

News Article about MLK's Church and Atlanta Housing Project

In this article, the author highlights Dr. King's involvement with a recent urban housing redevelopment project. The author states that the Ebenezer Baptist Church will commit full sponsorship; he later discusses the various plans in more detail and the purpose to community it will serve.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Yankowski to MLK

Monday, July 4, 1966

Mr. and Mrs. Yankowski of New York inform Dr. King of their plan to open a museum for junior high students featuring Americans of great importance. They request a collection Dr. King's past articles and photographs to be highlighted in the museum.

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

Letter from Joan Daves to Tetsuo Kohmoto

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Tetsuo Kohmoto that his letter to Dr. King has come. Joan also says that the terms are being worked out with Katahira of Charles E. Tuttle Co. The letter closes by telling Mr. Kohmoto that he will be hearing more about the matter.

Letter from William Perkins to MLK

This letter comes from a military inmate who makes claim to Dr. King of mistreatment and unjust imprisonment. Private William Perkins requests the assistance of Dr. King prior to writing to his congressman to complain of abuse and a lack of proper medical care.

Letter from L. H. R. Rasmussen to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

The author agrees with Dr. King's political stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The "dignity of man" is highlighted as it serves a great importance to the principles of the Civil Rights Movement and the war. The author affirms Dr. King's support from other peace organizations and political parties.

Newark Evening News: King's Standing Grows

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This 1966 Newark Evening News article outlines the history and progression of Dr. King's leadership during an SCLC initiative addressing discriminatory living practices in Chicago.

Letter from Dr. King to Rev. & Mrs. Sargent

Monday, November 8, 1965

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. & Mrs. Sargent for their efforts in getting him to visit Paris and for their support of funding SCLC.

Letter from George Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

George Johnson offers donating the services of his advertising agency to Dr. King as support for the Viet Nam [sic] war referendum in Missouri.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Thursday, July 30, 1964

A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King to make a tribute for Norman Thomas' eightieth birthday celebration.

The Social Organization of Nonviolence

Dr. King breaks down the structure of a nonviolent movement. He describes at length the difference between "token" integration and true integration. He describes three types of violence that could be used to achieve integration to which he prefers the "wholesome," nonviolent choice. Lastly, Dr. King gives his opinion on the "evils" of war.

Telegram from Thompson Bradley and Others to MLK

Sunday, February 12, 1967

The Pennsylvania Universities Council on Problems of War and Peace express their support to Dr. King.

War

Citing two sources concerning war, Dr. King notes the opinions of Dr. Charles W. Mayo and John M. Fletcher. Dr. Mayo believes that it is impossible to abolish war, as "war is part of our human inheritance," while Fletcher takes the opposite view in his book "Human Nature and World Peace."

Telegram from Wyatt T. Walker to President Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Wyatt T. Walker confirms his attendance at a meeting with President Kennedy at the White House.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Telegram from Mathew Ahmann to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Mathew Ahmann, on behalf of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, congratulates the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for a decade of leadership.

J. M. Douglas Expresses Concern about the Influx of Cuban Imigrants

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

J. M. Douglas writes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to express his concern for the influx of Cubans in America. He fears that jobs for young Negros are at stake and suggests that Dr. King include the concern in his demands for the March on Washington.

Letter from Rev. Sterling E. Glover and Rev. Henry Payden to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967

Reverend Glover informs Dr. King that he was surprised to hear that a statement was released regarding the planned summer conference. It was Reverend Glover's impression that no information would be released to the press, so that relations between the United Pastors Association and the SCLC would not be tainted.

Progress Report from Robert L. Green to SCLC Staff

Tuesday, September 12, 1967

Mr. Green sends this report to the SCLC staff concerning the Chicago Adult Education Project (CAEP). He writes of the problems and difficulties concerning black communities such as Lawndale, Illinois. He then goes on to describe what the major objective is and how the CAEP can help communities, like those in Lawndale. He proposes "to develop basic, needed educational tools to improve reading, writing, consumer and personal budget skills, and to provide the project with job-seeking skills."

Letter from Claudine Shannon to MLK

Tuesday, December 7, 1965

Claudine Shannon, a member of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, asks Dr. King to officiate her wedding ceremony. She mentions that he married her brother several years ago and explains that the bridegroom will cover all of Dr. King's expenses.