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Presentation of the Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights


Dr. King was a recipient of the first Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights. This award was issued by the Jamaican Government and was presented to Coretta Scott King due to the tragic death of Dr. King earlier in the year. This program outlines that event.

Letter from Harold E. Fey to MLK 12/31/59

Thursday, December 31, 1959
Chicago, IL

Dr. King was the recipient of this correspondence from Harold Fey, Editor of 'The Christian Century.' Mr. Fey acknowledged Dr. King's article "How My Mind Has Changed" and raised one concern of why Dr. King didn't mention his stabbing incident, in the article. He referenced Paul in the Bible by quoting Galatians 6:17, "I bear on my body the marks of Jesus." 'The Christian Century' published the article "How My Mind Has Changed."

Letter from E. R. Boynton to SCLC

Monday, March 18, 1968
Michigan (MI), Ohio (OH)

Mr. Boynton inquires about a financial contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Fund for which he has not received a receipt.


Dr. King meditates on death and a quotation from Thomas Carlyle in which Carlyle compares the death of his mother to the moon sinking into a dark sea.

Letter from Eunice Gentry to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Berkeley, CA

Eunice Gentry writes to Dr. King expressing gratitude for his bravery and encouraging words. In closing Gentry states, "I am glad you are marching for us."

Letter from JohnFischer to MLK Regarding an Article in Harper's Magazine

Wednesday, September 26, 1962
New York (NY), Albany, GA

John Fischer of Harpers Magazine informs Dr. King that the Albany Georgia article will not be published in the upcoming edition.

Fort Valley State College Vesper Program

Sunday, October 23, 1955
Fort Valley, GA, Georgia (GA)

This program outlines the events of a service held at Fort Valley State College in Georgia and notes Dr. King as the keynote speaker.

Address to AFL-CIO New York City District 65

New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King speaks to the District 65 AFL-CIO to address the importance of job opportunities in the northern and southern regions of the United States. He explains that the labor movement must stay active in order to gain civil rights and equal pay for African American workers.

Return Address Request

Chester, PA

GRE requests an address from MLK to send a copy of his test scores.

Philosophy of History

Dr. King writes about the philosophy of history according to Isaiah 41: 1-7.

SNCC Newsletter - The Student Voice

Friday, March 5, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Arkansas (AR), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Selma, AL, Maryland (MD)

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) began publishing "The Student Voice" in June 1960. The news magazine contained reports on SNCC activities, marches, sit-ins and other events related to the civil rights movement. The copy shown here is addressed to Andy Young.


Dr. King records a quote from Herbert Spencer’s “First Principles.”

Oberlin College Commencement

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., PUERTO RICO, VIETNAM, INDIA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New Hampshire (NH)

This issue of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine features commencement articles and photos as well as Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, Dr. King’s address to the graduating class.


Dr. King quotes Ernest Fremont Tittle's "The Lord's Prayer," in which Tittle explains how Jesus measured greatness.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Friday, June 5, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy expresses appreciation to Dr. King for agreeing to give an oral history interview for the JFK Library.

"In a Word-Now" by MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

In the attainment of civil rights, Dr. King stresses the importance and urgency of "NOW". He further expounds on the immediate and effective actions that should be exercised by the Federal government to better the society.

Letter From William S. Minor to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), Selma, AL

William S. Minor writes Dr. King thanking him for responding to a personal invite regarding research on racial revolution.

MLK's Weekend Itinerary

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

This itinerary reflects Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements at various churches and schools throughout Alabama.

Memo From Hosea Williams to SCLC Staff

Friday, March 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Hosea Williams, the National Director of Mobilization of the SCLC, sends this memorandum urging members to have their assigned region organized before Dr. King arrives on his People-To-People tour.

"King's New Book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 23, 1967
Missouri (MO)

This Argus newspaper clipping is a mini review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Expenses for Delegates

Kentucky (KY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), GEORGIA, Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Texas (TX)

This detailed list breaks down the travel, registration and room costs for delegates of several Southern states throughout the country.

Letter to Dora McDonald Regarding Persons Receiving Autographed Books

Thursday, June 29, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, California (CA), Berkeley, CA, Massachusetts (MA), Florida (FL), Minnesota (MN), Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Connecticut (CT), Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD

Dora McDonald receives a list of names who are to receive autographed copies of Dr. King's book. The list consists of contributors to American Foundation on Nonviolence and SCLC.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Sunday, August 6, 1967
California (CA)

William Kivi forwards Dr. King a copy of a postcard addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The correspondence alleges that the riots occuring in urban cities are a result of a economic stronghold to keep, in Kivi's view, "oppressing the oppressed." Kivi uses an example of California Governor Ronald Reagan's proposal to nix any federal program that supplements the War on Poverty.

Letter from Emily Barton Arrabee to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963
New Hampshire (NH)

Ms. Arrabee sends a check to Dr. King not for the SCLC, but for Dr. and Mrs. King to use to treat themselves in some way. Arrabee suggests a book, a new record or dinner together. The check is a token of her respect and admiration for both Dr. and Mrs. King.

MLK Draft Text Retrieved by T.D. Johnston

Alabama (AL), INDIA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), GERMANY, SOUTH AFRICA, Montgomery, AL, Jackson, MS

The document is a dedication from T. D. Johnston of Huntsville, Alabama to the King Center. Mr. Johnston acknowledges being on an Eastern Airline plane with Dr. King in 1961, where he noticed that Dr. King tossed a speech text that he found. He decided to hold on to the document for preservation and donated it to the King Center. Martin Luther King, III received the document on behalf of the King Center.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964
Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Illinois (IL)

Carey B. Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority thanks Dr. King for his willingness to participate in the Forty-first Boule held in Philadelphia.

Request for Autographed Photo of MLK

Georgia (GA)

Paul Garrison is requesting that Dr. King send an autographed photo so that he may add it to his collection.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Dr. King receives a telegram from Duncan Wood in Geneva, Switzerland concerning upcoming international trips.

Eulogy for Robert W. Spike

Dr. King highlights the life and work of American clergyman, theologian, and civil rights leader, Robert W. Spike. Spike was a leader known for mobilizing church participation for the Civil Rights Movement. Less than one year after accepting a professorship at the University of Chicago, he was murdered.

And There Was Love


Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.