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Letter from William Rutherford to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967

William Rutherford expresses his enthusiasm for being a new addition to Dr. King's team. Rutherford also encloses newspaper clipping on the Pacem in Terris meetings.

Highlander Reports: Black Power in Mississipi

In this newsletter, the writers speak about various issues concerning African Americans and their discrimination in politics.

The Story of Snick

Sunday, September 25, 1966

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.

Letter from J. Ross Flanagan to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Dr. King is invited by the Interreligious Committee on Vietnam to speak at a mass meeting in Washington, DC. A handwritten notation indicates that Dr. King cannot accept the invitation.

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

Letter from Harry Daniels to President Johnson

Sunday, December 25, 1966

Harry Daniels sends a copy of his letter to President Johnson to Dr. King, granting him permission to reprint it in his publications. In the letter, Daniels urges that in order to advance the freedom and equality of the United States, we must end poverty.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to Mr. Alan F. Westin

Monday, March 21, 1966

Vice President Hubert Humphrey congratulates Professor Alan Westin for the creation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from E.S. Baker

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

E.S. Baker, manager of the Canadian National Railways, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy requesting a copy of Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech. He began the letter by noting that he was an avid admirer of Dr. King and interested in acquiring some of his other recordings.

Niebuhr, Reinhold

Dr. King references the preface to Reinhold Niebuhr's book, "Reflection on the End of an Era."

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962

In support of the Albany Movement, the Albany Manifesto was drafted to make clear what the proponents of the cause sought to resolve.

Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

Letter from Murillo Millin to SCLC

Friday, April 20, 1962

Murillo Millin, President of the Van Buren Block Association, Inc., makes a contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

J.Campe encloses payment for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" British royalties.

How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil." In this sermon, King asserts that in many instances the facts of life contradicts a believer's faith, and poses reasons why one should hold firm to their faith.

Letter from Rev. Andrew T. Denholm to MLK

Wednesday, March 17, 1965

Rev. Andrew Denholm of St. Paul's United Church in Paris, Ontario send Dr. King a financial contribution and inquires about the need of northern whites for the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. He also inquires about the possibility of a civil rights worker addressing a group of people in his town.

Birthday Card from Belle and Cleveland to MLK

Dr. King receives a birthday card from Belle and Cleveland entitled, "North, South, East or West."

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom News Release

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

The National Urban League expresses it's gratitude for being apart of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Whitney Young expresses the importance of Americans continuing their fight for equality through the proper necessary legislation.

Newspaper Article about MLK

Saturday, August 21, 1965

In this article, Horace Sheffield responds to speculation that Dr. King will hold a "Summer Crusade" in Detroit.

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Jessie C. Treichler

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Mrs. Treichler to inform her that she will provide Dr. and Mrs. King arrival time at a later date. She also explains that Dr. King's physician has highly recommended that he limits his amount of events during his travels, therefore she feels sure that he will not be able to commit to all of her suggestions.

Letter from Martin Segal to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965

Martin Segal, the Dinner Chairman of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King asking him to attend the NUL's Equal Opportunity Dinner and accept membership on the dinner's honorary committee. Writing by Dorothy Cotton, Dr. King's assistant, appears at the top right, stating this was the same day that Dr. King would be attending President Johnson's White House Conference in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Imogene Cashmore to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Imogene Cashmore responds to Senator Dodd's recent statement in Congress about Moise Tshombe, a Congo politician who had recently been jailed on charges of treason. Cashmore condemns Senators Robert and Ted Kennedy for not trying to help Tshombe, questioning why there has been no negative response to the current government of Congo, which Cashmore charges is rampant with "mass murder and violation of civil rights."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Robinson to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson send a sermon to Reverend Abernathy and his followers hoping to encourage them on their difficult days ahead.

Letter Regarding the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition

A letter drafted by Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph, co-Chairmen of the Urban Coalition. includes article clippings from various newspapers discussing the dire need for public service employment, private employment, educational disparities, reconstruction and urban development, and equal housing opportunities.

Atheism

Dr. King writes on the topic atheism.

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

White Backlash Growing

Friday, August 26, 1966

The intensity in the Civil Rights Movement increased as blacks remained segregated and the Black Power movement gained popularity. White backlash increased during these times, but Dr. King noted that demonstrations "did not breed hate, but only revealed hatred that already existed."

Royalty Statement re: Why We Can't Wait

Thursday, December 31, 1964

This royalty statement for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait" has an itemization of royalties earned.

Letter From Chas D. Wherry to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Chas Wherry advises Dr. King to consult with Dr. H. H. Brookins about accumulating more funds for the March on Washington. Wherry also inquires about Dr. King sending a letter to the Los Angeles Times regarding Mrs. Bain's newly appointed position.

Telegram from Richard Avedon supporting MLK

Saturday, April 17, 1965

This telegram in support of Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War was sent by notable photographer, Richard Avedon, his wife, and Michael Mindlin.