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Petition for Charter, the Filing of the Clerk and Certificate of the Secretary of State for Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Thursday, March 24, 1966
Georgia (GA)

The following is a copy of the cover for the petition for charter,the filing of the Clerk and certificate of the Secretary of State for "Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Roselyn Silverman

Wednesday, January 4, 1967
Ohio (OH), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald informs Roselyn Silverman of Dr. King's availability to speak at the University of Toledo in Ohio. She also informs Miss Silverman that Dr. King will be out of the country writing a book, so further inquiries regarding "new invitations" will be made upon his return.

Letter to Ralph Abernathy Offering Suggestions

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

A supporter of the civil rights movement writes this letter to Reverend Abernathy. It is suggested that the Negro leaders of the civil rights movement consider the voting power of senior citizens. In order to get "a massive single solid vote bloc" it would be advantageous to also include the poor population. With this amount of supporters, the writer believes it would be possible to sustain a presidential candidacy. The author continues by telling Abernathy of Russia's economic goal.

New Attack on Highlander Folk School

Tuesday, July 16, 1963
Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA

The Southern Conference Educational Fund distributed this "Action Memo" to generate support for Highlander High School in a fight against the State of Tennessee.

Letter from Gloria Glissmeyer Regarding the State of the Nation

Thursday, February 29, 1968
Honolulu, HI, Texas (TX), London, England, New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C.

The following document is a letter written by Gloria Glissmeyer discussing the state of the nation during the Spring of 1968. The letter summarizes a series of events ranging from the Presidential Commission on Civil Disorder to the number of Americans killed in Vietnam.

Revolution In The Classroom

Friday, March 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Selma, AL

Dr. King addresses the Georgia Teachers and Education Association about the education of children in the South.

Time to Retire

Tuesday, November 20, 2012
New York, NY

This New York Times article advocates the mandatory retirement of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover upon his 70th birthday. The article specifically references Director Hoover's description of Dr. King as "the most notorious liar in the country."

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), PUERTO RICO

Mr. Kirkpatrick thanks Dr. King for his address at the Assembly in Puerto Rico for the World Convention of Churches of Christ. He also encloses a monetary donation to care for his expenses and serve as an honorarium.

Newspaper Clipping - "In Memoriam" MLK, NY Amsterdam News

Saturday, April 13, 1968
New York (NY)

This newspaper clipping is one of several full page "In Memoriam" dedications featured in various New York City newspapers following the assassination of Dr. King. The clippings accompany a letter from the Public Relations Director of the NAACP to the Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, newly installed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's death.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

MLK Address to District 65 of the AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 8, 1962
New York (NY), Florida (FL), Albany, GA, Little Rock, AR, Jackson, MS, Montgomery, AL, ITALY, GERMANY, FRANCE, JAPAN

Dr. King addresses District 65 of the AFL-CIO in Monticello, New York. He begins by expressing his appreciation to the AFL-CIO for their generous contributions to the Civil Rights Movement. He discusses the impact of the Albany Movement and segregation in the South. Dr. King makes the point that America refers to itself as a world leader, yet we are significantly behind other countries in social and welfare legislation.

Letter from Wilson Woodbeck to MLK

Saturday, November 18, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Woodbeck invites Dr. King to be an honorary member of the National Association of Negro Musicians. For Dr. King’s review, several letters are enclosed complimenting the organization on their work and contribution to society.

Letter from Murray Thomson to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966
Atlanta, GA, CANADA

Thomson, a representative of the Canadian Friends' Service Committee, invites Dr. King to participate in a week-long conference held in Toronto, Ontario. The event will consist of diplomats from all over the world.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College, invites Dr. and Mrs. King to lunch after the Morehouse Board of Trustees Meeting.

Letter from Derrick Cameron to MLK

Thursday, January 20, 1966
Chicago, IL

Derrick Cameron, a seventh grade student, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his fight in Civil Rights. In addition, Cameron offers to make copies on his ditto machine; a low-volume printing method used mainly by schools and churches.

Letter from Lloyd E. Abbey to Mr. Duncan J. Parks about Communism

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), New York (NY)

In this letter Lloyd E. Abbey reacts to an article in the Star-Gazette. Abbey asserts that "Our survival, in relation to the ideology of communism, is very questionable" and "The principle fault... ... the nine old men...," namely Dr. King, Benjamin Spock, William Coffin, Rap Brown, 'Hooligan' [Stokely] Carmichael and others. Abbey connects this to the war in Vietnam.

Biographical Sketches of Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO), Minnesota (MN), North Carolina (NC), Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Little Rock, AR, Jackson, MS, Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL, Maryland (MD), Chicago, IL, Berlin, Germany

These are biographical sketches of various leaders who were involved in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms. These distinguished individuals were involved in organizations that focused on equality and nonviolence.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to MLK

Monday, April 19, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Annalee Stewart, Legislative and Branch Liaison for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, invites Dr. King to speak at the organization's fiftieth anniversary banquet. She provides a historic backdrop for the organization and explains its current focus on "Peace, Freedom and Bread."


Virginia (VA), Louisiana (LA)

Antoinette McNally retells the story of a Negro man who was brutally murdered for the alleged rape of a white woman. McNally shares that the story has been kept silenced for forty-six years.

Letter from Margit Sahlin to MLK

Saturday, October 24, 1964
SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden

Margit Sahlin of the Church of Sweden invites Dr. King to a "symposium with prominent and interested Swedes" during his trip to Scandinavia.

Letter from Moses Walker to MLK

Saturday, January 30, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King moves his family to Chicago to assist with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Walker writes to Dr. King on behalf of the Republican party of the twenty fourth ward. He thanks Dr. King for choosing the twenty fourth ward as the starting point for his campaign to end slum housing. Mayor Daley eventually negotiated with Dr. King to build better housing and to make mortgages available regardless of race.

Letter from Corinne B. Hill and Harold Stassen to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 12, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Harold Stassen correspond with Dora McDonald expressing gratitude for a letter sent a few days earlier. The letter involves a book to be written by Dr. King.

Letter from C. B. Kelley to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Ohio (OH), Massachusetts (MA), Cincinnati, OH, VIETNAM

C. B. Kelley shares his disagreement with Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. V. Willis

Tuesday, February 20, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Coatesville, Pennsylvania in support of the NAACP. He explains that his recent commitment to the SCLC Board to tour the South for a voter registration campaign prevents him from accepting any additional speaking engagements.

Letter from Abe Feinglass to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Abe Feinglass, International Vice-President of Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, requests that Dr. King review and comment on the organization's pamphlets.

Letter to J. Avery from MLK

Friday, May 13, 1966
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses embarrassment because of his late response to a telegram requesting his presence and explains that the mistake is due to an overworked, understaffed office. The tone of the letter conveys the personal concern King feels for each of the numerous individuals who seek his participation in events around the country.

Letter from Jay Richard Kennedy to MLK

Monday, October 28, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Jay Kennedy encloses a copy of a picture and a transcript from a television program that included Dr. King. He thanks Dr. King for an earlier letter and explains that their views are aligned. Kennedy also briefly discusses civil rights in America and the federal government.

Letter from Carol Thomas to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968
New York (NY)

Carol Thomas writes Dr. King to inform him that she is making a donation to help with the war on poverty. Enclosed with the letter is a $125.00 check. She also explains that she received one of King's books in the mail. Ms. Thomas further inquires of the purchasing and mailing information of books made to the public.

Peter Lombard


Dr. King outlines biographical information regarding theologian Peter Lombard.

Letter from Stuart Nelson to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 29, 1966
Washington, D.C.

The Vice President of Howard University writes to Dora McDonald, inviting Dr. King to visit the school while he is in town for the presentation of the Gandhi statue.