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Letter from John G. Allerdice Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 29, 1963

John Allerdice writes Dr. King on behalf of the Human Relations Council of Shortridge High School regarding a planned conference that will discuss human relations for the high school students of Indianapolis. They would like for Dr. King to "tape a short message" for them to use.

Scripps Howard: Dr. King Asks LBJ to Do As Hero FDR Did

Monday, January 15, 1968

Tom Talburt reports in this article that Dr. King urged President Johnson to create jobs and provide for the disadvantaged in order to prevent another summer of riots, such as the Los Angeles Watts Riots of 1965.

Letter from Jan Helge Jansen to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

The Norwegian Student Association invites Dr. King to speak at one of their meetings and suggest the topic of his lecture be human rights and freedom.

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Jimerson

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. King sends a biographical sketch of himself to Gertrude Jimerson and recommends she obtain a copy of Crusader Without Violence, a biography of Dr. King written by Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick and published by Harper and Row.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

Letter from Sixth Grader to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Kathy Brewster, an African American sixth grade student from Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude towards Dr. King for helping the Negro race.

Letter from Howard Schomer to Robert Kennedy

Saturday, October 26, 1963

Howard Schomer asks the US Attorney General several questions about the legality of a police raid that occurred at a Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) office in New Orleans, Louisiana. Schomer wants to know if the statute under which the raid was carried out has legal force and does the Department of Justice have an obligation to make its evidence public?

National Emergency Action Committee Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, February 14, 1967

This document states that the Provisional Executive Committee of the National Emergency Action Committee will meet in Chicago on Wednesday, February 22, 1967. The document then givies the meeting agenda.

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Monday, April 3, 1967

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from MLK to Laura R. Daly

Tuesday, April 19, 1966

Dr. King apologizes to Laura Daly for his delayed response and expresses his appreciation for her financial contribution. He states that the "new democracy" that has emerged in the south would not be possible without the moral and financial support from contributors such as Miss Daly. He discusses how there is still work to accomplish and the SCLC will continue their efforts in the freedom struggle.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Monday, February 19, 1962

Dr. King and Wyatt Walker send an urgent request for Burke Marshall to investigate the bombing of SCLC Board Member C. O. Simpkins' home in Shreveport, Louisiana. The two SCLC officials inform Mr. Marshall that the suspects were released for lack of evidence despite other information to the contrary.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rosa A. King

Thursday, July 12, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Rosa King that Dr. King will be unable to speak at Central Baptist Church.

Letter from Bette Zugerman to Rev. Abernathy, SCLC

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Ms. Zugerman writes Reverend Abernathy to introduce an enclosed document which she suggests is the "one and only non-violent answer to alleviate the suffering of all people."

Letter from Dr. King to the Media Seeking Support for Negroes Living in Chicago

support from white media outlets to help fight for freedom of the average black citizen in chicago
ernie banks, billy williams, don bufords and floyd robinson

Totalitarianism

Dr. King quotes a modern historian on their ideas of totalitarianism.

Letter from Sydney J. Chase to MLK

Wednesday, March 16, 1960

Mr. Chase, a political science major at Hofstra College, has reached out to Dr.King inquiring about assistance with his term paper on "non-violence as a political force."

Niebuhr (Christ)

Dr. King writes on Niebuhr's perception of Christ.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elizabeth Babcock

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Babcock that she received the contribution for the SCLC on behalf of Dr. King. Miss McDonald tells Mrs. Babcock that Dr. King is imprisoned in Selma, Alabama and that he will respond upon his release.

SCLC Newsletter: April 1962

Sunday, April 1, 1962

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces five new members will join the staff. The five men are: John H. Calhoun, Herbert V. Coulton, James L. Bevel, Fred C. Bennette, and Bernard S. Lee. These men derive from different locations across America and add different levels of education and commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Angels

Dr. King mentions the concept of patron angels that appears in Daniel 10:13, 20, and 21.

Letter from MLK to James M. Nielsen

Tuesday, February 11, 1964

Dr. King informs Mr. Nielsen that he will not be able to speak in Anacortes, Washington due to the struggle in the South. Dr. King also thanks Mr. Nielsen for congratulating him on being Time Magazine's Man of the Year.

Letter from S. O. Adebo to Theodore Brown

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

S. O. Adebo, a permanent representative of the Permanent Mission of Nigeria to the United Nations, requests a meeting with Mr. Brown and his colleagues. Mr. Brown is the Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa. This letter references the Nigeria-Biafra situation, which Dr. King was deeply concerned about.

Meet the Press Interview

Sunday, August 13, 1967

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

The Atlanta Board of Education

Friday, September 15, 1967

The Atlanta Board of Education neglects to solve educational issues in the Negro community. There are protests and demonstrations from those who object to the disdain of action. Julian Bond purposes a course of action designed to educate, convince, and force action from the board.

MLK's Transcript from Crozer Theological Seminary

Wednesday, December 6, 1950

In 1948, Dr. King entered Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. Engaging in a sincere quest for knowledge, he sought stimulation in the works of several prominent areas, like philosophy and theology. As a result of his efforts and achievements at Crozer, Dr. King was chosen as the Valedictorian of the graduating class of 1951.

Letter from Philip Hart to Mr. Glen E. Aldrich

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

In this letter, Senator Philip Hart comments on the First Amendment and Dr. King's future march.

Letter from Ben Cashion to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Ben Cashion writes Dr. King sharing some of his observations. Cashion suggests that Dr. King takes his time and get closer to God to provoke efficient change.

Sin

Dr. King offers two possible interpretations of Psalms 53:1.

Current Magazine

Thursday, August 1, 1963

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.