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Letter from Charles W. Lockyer to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Charles Lockyer sends Dr. King a special limited edition of the International Library of Negro Life and History as a gift. Lockyer explains that the book series is a collaboration between his publishing company and the Association for Study of Negro Life and History.

Letter from Frank Clarke to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965

Frank Clarke requests a letter of recommendation from Dr. King. Mr. Clarke seeks to obtain the position of the Assistant Press Secretary to the President.

Nero History an Culture

This flyer features an adult course offered by Berkley Unified School District. The curriculum includes an analysis of African American history, cultural and socially contextual outlooks.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to Lyndon B. Johnson

Saturday, May 6, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to President Johnson suggesting a program to help end the war in Vietnam. Smedley urges President Johnson to implement the plan to bring an end to the longstanding fight.

Letter from Diane M. Monk to Dora McDonald

Friday, August 16, 1963

Ms. Monk, a student, thanks Miss McDonald for her assistance with a school report. Monk also suggests that other students be instructed to read Dr. King's books, particularly "Stride for Freedom," for valuable information.

Telegram from Andrew J. Young to Rev. W. Ivan Hoy

In this correspondence, Young informed Rev. Hoy due to recent events in Selma, Alabama Dr. King had cancel all his engagements for the month of February. Therefore, Dr.King would not be able to speak at the University of Miami.

Telegram from John E. Fogarty to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

In this telegram, John E. Fogarty writes Dr. King in support of the Administration Bill.

Letter from Viva Sloan to MLK

Tuesday, June 19, 1962

Viva O'Dean Sloan commends Dr. King on his efforts, but calls on his support to promote denominational integration of religions.

Telegram from Walter T. Dixon to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Walter T. Dixon, a City Councilman from Baltimore, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Handwritten notes on the Personality of God

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on personality of God. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from Murray Thomson to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

A representative of the Canadian Friends Service Committee, a subcommittee of The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in Canada, writes Dr. King to invite him to a "Conference for Diplomats." The sender tells Dr. King that the Conference will take place in Portland, Ontario, and emphasizes Human Rights Year. He asks Dr. King to consider being the keynote speaker for the event.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Beverly A. Asbury

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

In this letter Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rev. Beverly Asbury for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He stresses the importance of supporters' contributions in order to successfully continue the initiative toward unity, justice, and equality.

How My Mind Has Changed In the Last Decade

Dr. King discusses how his thoughts about theological theory have changed over the years. It is the only page of the document in the collection.

Letter from Mr. Harry W. Allison, Ph.D. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Mr. Allison, a white clinical psychologist, expresses his support of Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Joe Augustine to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mr. Augustine claims that he is able to point directly to who is responsible for the wrong that is going on in the country, and would like to mail Dr. King more information to this effect.

Neoplatonism

Dr. King describes neoplatonism as "ideas of God." Neoplatonism is focused on the thoughts of Greek Philosopher, Plato.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Oberlin College Commencement

This issue of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine features commencement articles and photos as well as Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, Dr. King’s address to the graduating class.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the danger of subjective religion without objective religion.

Letter from Daniel L. Eckert to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

This letter was written to Dr.King to express disapproval for Dr.King's support of Adam Clayton Powell. Mr. Eckert states that Mr.Powell should be treated as white leaders are treated.

Letter from Martha Roberts to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Martha Roberts, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, chastises Dr. King for leading marches and speaking against the war in Vietnam. She expresses to Dr. King that his focus should be on teaching "your people" to learn trades, enhance education and accept gradual change.

Birmingham Manifesto

This document boldly declares the stance of the oppressed Negro population of Birmingham, Alabama. Critiquing the validity of democracy, this manifesto speaks to the unjust treatment of the Negro as a second class citizen, including being "segregated racially, exploited economically, and dominated politically."

Transformed Nonconformist

In this draft of the "Transformed Nonconformist", Dr. King urges the abandonment of societal practices of injustice.

Letter from Era Canon to MLK

Monday, December 11, 1961

Era Canon notifies Dr. King that her friend Doris Greene, whom recently passed, was very intrigued by his work. Mrs. Canon wants to contribute to Dr. King's organization with some of the finances Mrs. Greene has obtained upon her passing.

Letter from the Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

Thursday, August 1, 1963

The Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund informs Dr. King that they have distributed copies of the Letter from Birmingham Jail. Those who read the letter were impressed and described it as a "masterful job." The organization contributes to the SCLC for lobbying the passage of the President's Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a recent telegram concerning an investigation in the alleged assault upon Miss Shirley Gaines by an Albany police officer.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Cooperative/Noble Competition

Dr. King writes a sermon on the topic "Cooperative Competition." King utilizes the biblical text deriving from Luke chapter 22 verse 24, which expresses how Jesus views competition. According to the text, Jesus thinks that competition is good as long as an individual competes with humility and serving others.

Telegram from MLK to President John F. Kennedy

Friday, March 30, 1962

Dr. King sends an urgent telegram to President Kennedy recommending Judge William Hastie and Judge Thurgood Marshall be given serious consideration for a seat on the Supreme Court.

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.