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Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers for MLK

Saturday, December 31, 1966

This royalty statement from Harper & Row Publishers, details earnings for Dr. King's book "Strength to Love," for the six-month period ending 12/31/66.

Breadbasket and National Tea Agree

Monday, December 12, 1966

Operation Breadbasket teams up with the National Tea Company to improve employment and business opportunities for Negroes.

Letter from Norman Walsh to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Norman Walsh thanks Dr. King for being a spokesperson for Vietnam, poverty, and civil rights.

Letter from Irma Monsky to Mary McHugh

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

In this letter, Irma Monsky informs Mary McHugh that their panel of judges selected "Christians and Jews: The Tragic Past and the Hopeful Future" and Dr. King's "Where Do We Go from Here", as winners for their National Mass Media Brotherhood Award Program.

Black Power

In the article, Dr. King address the emerging Black Power movement. He feels that this movement will only promote Black extremism and supremacy which would be following in the steps of the White oppressor. Dr. King believes that the tactic of nonviolence is the only way to move through civil injustice and that everyone must collectively work together to achieve the common goal.

Jesus: Mission

Dr. King notes passages in Matthew and Luke related to Jesus' mission.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. Baum

Monday, February 28, 1966

Dora McDonald writes H. Baum requesting that he relay to Monica Wilson that Dr. King has accepted her invitation to speak at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

Letter from Isac Anderson to MLK

Sunday, August 20, 1967

Isac Anderson is requesting help from Dr. King in regards to obtaining a higher education. Anderson was forced to withdraw from school due to interfernece and his inability to concentrate. He hopes that with Dr. King's help he will be able to resolve this issue.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous author instructs Dr. King on how he should prepare his people for the end of the world.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Jaggart to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Mr and Mrs. C. Jaggart express how much they enjoyed one of Dr. King's messages.

Telegram from Melvin Arnold to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962

Melvin Arnold asks Dr. King to approve either "The Strength to Love" or "The Cost of Love" as the title of Dr. King's book.

The Real Poverty

Sunday, December 4, 1966

SCLC Director of Public Relations Junius Griffin announces the opening of the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the Wilcox County, Alabama branch of the SCLC. Throughout the speech, he asserts that true poverty is a "man without compassion," and that any person who does not know how to help others is worse off than "our ancestors who were slaves."

Letter from Celeste Buches to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968

Celeste Buches writes to Dr. King requesting campaign information for the Choice 68' mock presidential elections at Mt. St. Scholastica and St. Benedict's College in Kansas.

Letter from MLK to F. A. Bussey

Friday, March 23, 1962

Dr. King informs the National Morehouse College Alumni President that he will be unable to meet with a group of Morehouse men following his address at Howard University. His schedule is too hectic even though he would enjoy the "hours of fellowship."

Letter from Vera M. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

Inspired by an article in the Saturday Evening Post, Vera Jones congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Fannie Lou Hamer to Friends

Monday, October 23, 1967

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer requests the help of 'Friends', pertaining to voting rights in Mississippi. Mrs. Hamer also details some of the sufferings of black folks in Mississippi, especially, as it pertains to potential repercussions for them registering to vote.

Traditionalism

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman’s “Introduction to Philosophy.”

Proposed Program: Lincoln Memorial

This program entails several male and female speakers who are deeply rooted and connected in the Civil Rights Movement. These speakers were expected to speak at the Lincoln Memorial.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967

This telegram forwarded by Rodney Clurman to Dr. King sends word regarding the need for transportation, food, medical supplies and water. Clurman also makes mention of a smallpox epidemic, stating that fifty million may die from the disease. He closes by encouraging the Reverend to wire him if interested in accompanying him to Scotland.

Letter from Jo Ellen Braveman to MLK

Jo Ellen Braveman, Secretary of the Human Relations Club of Julia Richman High School, presents Dr. King with the Julia Richman Brotherhood Award. Braveman says, "You truly deserve this award because of your dedicated outstanding work in Human Relations."

Letter from E. M. Blaz to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Mr. Blaz writes Dr. King to inform him about the formation of the Negro organization Chicago Central Service Bureau. This organization is an enterprise that includes a variety of programs that offer education towards consumer loans, mortgage loans, travel agencies, insurance, etc.

Letter from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Friday, February 3, 1967

Teddy Kollek, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Israel, expresses appreciation and support for Dr. King's planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. At the time of this letter, West Jerusalem was Israeli territory and East Jerusalem part of Jordan. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

Speech to National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King answers a number of questions from the National Press Club.

Letter From Jane Hall to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Jane Hall writes Dr. King suggesting that there be a focus on equitable representation of the negro in television advertising in order to attain "maximum quality and quantity" of integration.

Letter from Bret Harte Junior High School to MLK

Tuesday, October 3, 1967

The eighth grade class from Bret Harte Junior High School writes to Dr.King to inquire about his opinion on race relations. The students expressed that they believed that Negros deserve equal rights.

Letter from David Brandyberry to MLK

Thursday, June 20, 1963

David Brandberry, a student 16 years of age, informs Dr. King that he desires to voice his opinion about the racial issues in the south. Mr. Brandberry cannot comprehend the logical reasoning of racism and the motives of the "ignorant whites." Furthermore, the student discusses the issues of immigration and the political concept of communism. Mr. Brandberry states that he "wish he had been born a Negro" to he could be of more assistance in the movement.

SCLC Resolution on 1966 Civil Rights Act

Thursday, August 11, 1966

At its Tenth Annual Convention, the SCLC Board adopts a resolution calling upon President Johnson and Congress to reverse a vote on Title IV (Open Housing) of the Civil Rights Act of 1966 that effectively permits discrimination in the sale or rental of private housing. It also faults the Administration for failure to enforce Title VI (Ban on Federal Funds for Segregated Programs and Schools) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and for inadequate appointment of voter examiners under the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Letter from MLK to Dr. William H. Allen regarding kind letter

Tuesday, October 15, 1968

Dr. King sent this thank you letter to Dr. William Allen for the prayers and well wishes expressed to Dr. King, as he recovered from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem in 1958. He also conveyed to Dr. Allen that he had been making great progress in his health and anticipated rejoining those working hard in the fight for equality.

Letter from Silas K. Brown to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mr. Brown requests the help of Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of Reverend U.S. Gilliam. Reverend Gilliam, the first Negro to run for public office in Grenada, Mississippi, is under attack by whites in his community.

Telegram from John P. O'Rourke to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

John P. O'Rourke writes Dr. King to express his support of the Southern Baptist Convention.