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Jesus

Dr. King compares Iago's description of Shakespeare's Othello to the view many have of Jesus.

Chicago Project - From the Study of MLK

Chicago, IL

Dr. King reviews the historical accomplishments of the SCLC, its future goals and visions, and provides an overview of the "Chicago Project."

Immortality

Dr. King quotes Alfred Tennyson on the topic of immortality.

Letter from Mary Welcome to MLK

Minnesota (MN), Alabama (AL)

Miss Welcome praises the work that Dr. King has done for civil rights. She also offers him her prayers and promises to send money to aid the cause when she is able to afford it.

Chapter 1 - Introduction

Vermont (VT)

In this dissertation, Dr. King discusses several investigations and problems. He centers the paper around a comparison of "the conceptions of God in the thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ruby Hurley

Thursday, January 3, 1963
Georgia (GA)

At Dr. King's request, Ms. McDonald sends Ruby Hurley a check from Delores Robinson for a lifetime membership in the NAACP.

Letter from William M. Gray to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY)

William Gray offers his prayers and support as Rev. Abernathy takes over command of the SCLC following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
DENMARK, Stockholm, Sweden, VIETNAM

Peggy Duff invites Dr. King to speak in Copenhagen on behalf of the Danish Peace Movement.

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

VIETNAM, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, Brooklyn, NY, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

94:17 General Correspondence 1966(B)

Thursday, April 21, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI)

Mrs. Burke, a representative of the Wisconsin Council of Teachers of English, requests permission to reprint several exerts from the "I Have a Dream" address. The material will be included in the Johnson publication, entitled "The Day They Marched".

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Christianity

Dr. King outlines Angus' interpretation of Hegel's views on Christianity in the book, "The Mystery Religion and Christianity."

Letter from Gwedolyn Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1962
Memphis, TN

Gwedolyn Johnson of Friendship Baptist invites Dr. King to a public speaking engagement held on his behalf. She encourages Dr. King to speak directly to the youth in an effort to increase moral and social activism. She requests a specific date in addition to estimated traveling costs.

Theology

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Problems of Whitehead

Dr. King discusses the problem of metaphysical dualism as presented by philosopher Alfred North Whitehead. Dr. King reviewed much of Whitehead's work while at Boston University and later quoted him in his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

Telegram from Mark O. Hatfield to MLK

Oregon (OR)

Mark Hatfield declines an invitation from Dr. King due to other commitments.

Religion and Race Memo

Friday, July 15, 1966
Mississippi (MS), New Jersey (NJ), Alabama (AL), Connecticut (CT), Texas (TX), Washington (WA), Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL

The Religion and Race organization distributes a memo to discuss the various topics involving the meaning of "black power", the United Presbyterians joint actions within the Mississippi March, the testimony's end in Wilcox County, and Project Equality.

Letter from Bruce A. King to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
AUSTRALIA, Washington, D.C.

Bruce King, Secretary of the Baptist Union of New South Wales, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter Regarding the Distribution of Pilgrimage Folders

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Sandy F. Ray thanks Andrew Young for speaking to his parishioners. Reverend Ray also requests information regarding the distribution of the Pilgrimage Folders, in preparation for the mass pilgrimage Dr. King was planning to lead to Israel and Jordan.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document boldly declares the stance of the oppressed Negro population of Birmingham, Alabama. Critiquing the validity of democracy, this manifesto speaks to the unjust treatment of the Negro as a second class citizen, including being "segregated racially, exploited economically, and dominated politically."

Letter from Dwight Campbell to MLK

Tuesday, September 22, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The Methodist Youth Fellowship extends a second invitation to Dr. King to speak to in Philadelphia. The proposed speaking engagement would coincide with Dr. King's appearance at the Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee meeting.

Letter from Robert Dent to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Chairman Robert Dent welcomes Dr. King to San Diego County on behalf of the Board of Supervisors. Dent highlights the growth of Southern California in industry as well as the county's work towards equality. Dent also discusses the importance of Christianity in their endeavors.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

VIETNAM, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, CHINA

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Telegram from Reinhold Niebuhr to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965
New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regrets that a stroke prevents him from accepting Dr. King's invitation to participate in the Selma-to-Montgomery March and hopes there will be "massive" support.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

"A Constructive Use of the Sense of Shame" is the title of this sermon outline, prepared by Dr. King. The parable of the 'Prodigal Son' is the chosen text for the sermon.

Telegram from Dr. Albert Davis to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. Albert Davis and the Atlanta Chapter of the NAACP praise Dr. King for his "continued leadership and revolutionary ideas."

Letter from Illustrated World Encyclopedia to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
New York (NY)

Bobley asks Ms. McDonald if Dr. King will allow a reprint of one of his articles to be published in the Illustrated World Encyclopedia in lieu of King writing a new piece.

Letter from Anonymous Critic to MLK

A critic sends Dr. King a series of newspaper clippings in order to communicate an adverse view about "negro people." The author brings special attention to an enclosed article about Stokely Carmichael and asks for his view. After accusing Dr. King of receiving money from the Communist Party, the writer states "I will never know why you was given the noble award."

Letter from Henry S. Huntington to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Montgomery, AL, Philadelphia, PA, HONG KONG

Huntington writes to Dr. King concerning the separation of a mother and child in hospitals after birth. Huntington states, "If we get back to nature's ways in our hospitals instead of starting each new human life in America by rejecting it, as it were, I suspect the increase of juvenile delinquency would melt away."

Examination for MLK Class

This document contains examination questions for Dr. King's class. Dr. King taught a class at Morehouse College briefly in the early 1960s.