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"CZECH REPUBLIC"

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Monday, December 30, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C.

The Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg invites Dr. King to speak at meeting that will be held at the Pennsylvania State Educational Building. Martin Morand, Vice-President of the Council, also includes information about the issues in Harrisburg's black community to show why Dr. King should accept the invitation.

Address to AFL-CIO New York City District 65

New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King speaks to the District 65 AFL-CIO to address the importance of job opportunities in the northern and southern regions of the United States. He explains that the labor movement must stay active in order to gain civil rights and equal pay for African American workers.

Suggested SCLC Organizational Structure

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This document outlines the preliminary organizational structure of SCLC with brief descriptions of roles and responsibilities.

Letter from Toni Harris to Mrs. King 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY

Young Toni Harris, a student in NYC, wrote this letter to Mrs. King sharing her hope that Dr. King's killer would be caught. This letter is an example of the many levels of support shown towards the King family, from schoolchildren who loved Dr. King.

Letter from George T. Raymond to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963
Chester, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

George Raymond, Rebecca Taylor and Rosa Ballard follow up with Dr. King about his availability to speak to the NAACP in Chester, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Wednesday, November 13, 1963
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Maynard Gertler writes Dr. King requesting a copy of his speech given during the March on Washington. Additionally Gertler requests speeches by Baynard Rustin and A. Philip Randolph. Gertler also mentions that he was present when Dr. King spoke in Montreal last year.

Letter from Judy Richardson to Mrs. King

Thursday, September 30, 1965

In this letter, Judy Richardson of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee asks Mrs. King to help them revise a second edition of the "Negro History Primer."

Letter from Beatrice Rossell to MLK

Saturday, July 4, 1964
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA

Beatrice Rossell wrote this letter to Dr. King on Independence Day in 1964, commending him on the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and enclosing a donation. She ends her note, saying "God bless you, your fine family, and the future of your great work."

Draft Letter from MLK to Ms. Giunier

New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to an offer of assistance from a supporter. He directs her to the New York office to jumpstart her work and commends her for her interest in the Freedom Movement.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964
Florida (FL)

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Machiavelli

Dr. King disagrees with Machiavelli's notion that political morality should be separated from social morality. Dr. King uses a quote from Heinrich von Treitschke to further analyze the issue.

Norwegian Peace Initiative

Friday, January 6, 1967
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

Five Norwegians concerned about the Vietnam conflict propose that winners of the Nobel Peace Prize form a negotiating delegation to visit the US and Hanoi governments.

Telegram from Randolph Blackwell to Mr. M. H. Thomas

Friday, August 6, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Randolph T. Blackwell sends a telegram to M. H. Thomas to permit the SCLC to honor requests for telephone installations made by Carole Hoover.

Telegram from Harry Belafonte to Coretta Scott King

New York, NY

In this telegram, Mr. Belafonte sympathizes with Mrs. King as she is preparing for Dr. King's sentence of four months in prison.

Location & Situation

Dr. King compares the meanings of "location" and "situation."

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, THAILAND, CHINA, SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY), SOUTH KOREA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

Telegram to MLK from Medgar Evers

Friday, May 23, 1958
Jackson, MS

Mississippi Civil Rights leader Medgar Evers sends a telegram to confirm his presence at the upcoming SCLC meeting in Clarksdale on May 29, 1958.

Letter from Joan Finney to MLK

Tuesday, September 10, 1963
San Francisco, CA, California (CA), Atlanta, GA

California Democratic Council Secretary Joan Finney encloses the remainder of a financial contribution to Dr. King and the SCLC. Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker was the keynote speaker for an event held by the council and was presented the first part of this donation.

Augustine (Concept of Evil)

Dr. King quotes theologian St. Augustine's "Confessions."

Letter to Ralph D. Abernathy from Ralph E. Gulliver

Tuesday, November 26, 1963
New York (NY)

The James H. Farrell Lodge contributes to the SCLC for the cause of Freedom-Now.

Choice 68 Request for Information

Washington, D.C.

The students of the Catholic University of America are participating in the Choice 68' elections and request that Dr. King provide information of himself so that they may further promote his Presidential candidacy.

Letter from Anonymous Writer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE), ITALY, POLAND, SPAIN, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

The author of this letter copies an article "Communists Meet the Church," published by the San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle, to support his accusations of cooperation between the Catholic Church and Communists.

Letter from William M. Gray to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY)

William Gray offers his prayers and support as Rev. Abernathy takes over command of the SCLC following Dr. King's death.

Letter to MLK from Alan Westin

Friday, April 8, 1966
New York, NY

Alan F. Westin invites Dr. King to serve on the Board of Governors of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties of Columbia Univeristy and Teachers College. Westin describes the mission of the Center and asks Dr. King to join in their efforts of developing civil rights teaching techniques to be used in all levels of public education.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, Illinois (IL), New York (NY)

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

Letter from Mrs. Elizabeth Sherrill to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. Sherrill informs Dr. King of a young man, Mr. Jerry Peace, from her church, St. Mark's, who shows great promise as a poet. She encourages Dr. King to reach out to Mr. Peace to help direct his "rather anger energy" into a new direction.

Letter from Max Tak to MLK

Tuesday, February 28, 1967
NETHERLANDS, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Tak requests a statement for the Elseviers Weekblad cover story titled, "Is Satan Still Alive?" from Dr. King.

Co-Op Movements for Black Economic Development

Chicago, IL, California (CA), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Illinois (IL)

This memorandum sent to Dr. King by Professor St. Clair Drake, is a full proposal for the development/revival of the co-operative movements among negroes in large urban centers.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Family Planning-A Special and Urgent Concern

Thursday, May 5, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

This document contains Dr. King's response on receiving the Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the Fiftieth Anniversary Banquet of Planned Parenthood-World Population. Margaret Sanger is famous for opening the first birth control clinic in the USA and establishing Planned Parenthood. Dr. King discusses the benefits of family planning for the Negro family, as well as similarities between his and Margaret' Sanger's efforts for equality. Also featured is a photograph of Coretta Scott King accepting the award on Dr. King's behalf.