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"CZECH REPUBLIC"

Christ

Dr. King quotes a passage from Adolf Harnack's "What Is Christianity?" in which Harnack contrasts Plato's focus on the wise with that of Jesus Christ, who finds value in every human.

Diagram of Apartment Complex Sponsored by Ebenezer Baptist Church

Three dimensional diagram of an apartment complex sponsored by Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Schleiermacher (The Church and State)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Edwin Berry to Jane Lee J. Eddy

Friday, November 18, 1966

Edwin Berry, Executive Director of the Chicago Urban League, writes Jane Lee Eddy, Secretary of the Taconic Foundation, to request funding for a "get-out-the-vote campaign" in Chicago.

The Martin Luther King Column (2)

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband, Lucius, on behalf of the civil rights movement.

Statement for Immediate Release from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, May 29, 1967

Harper & Row Publishers issued this press release to announce the arrival of Dr. King's final publication. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was his first written narrative, since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The release also noted that the book would address Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. The tentative date of publishing, according to the document, was June 19, 1967.

J.H. Emms to MLK

J.H. Emms offers his approval and support to Dr. King regarding his position on Civil Rights and the Vietnam problem, which were expressed at speeches in Los Angeles and New York.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Ellington

Wednesday, July 28, 1965

Dr. King writes Ruth Ellington of New York to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He describes the current efforts of the SCLC and explains the importance of supporters for the continuation of the SCLC.

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

Ed Clayton creates a brochure on behalf of SCLC. The brochure contains a message from Dr. King, pictures of SCLC members, a history of the organization and information regarding their initiatives.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

The Brotherhood of Mount Calvary Baptist Church

Sunday, October 12, 1958

Mount Calvary Baptist Church held their annual men's day program on October 12, 1958 in honor of Dr. King's "courageous fight for integration."

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to General James M. Gavin

Friday, March 29, 1968

Harry H. Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes to General James M. Gavin, regarding a previously postponed meeting with Dr. King. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the necessity of Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from MLK to James Hoffa

Monday, December 19, 1966

Dr. King offers support to James Hoffa, President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, several months prior to the start of Mr. Hoffa's prison term at Lewisburg Federal Penitentiary in Pennsylvania.

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King shortly after President Kennedy's assassination to urge him to take precautions.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Harry Belafonte expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. King for appearing with him on the "Tonight Show." Harry Belafonte concludes by thanking Dr. King for his friendship and for giving his time so generously.

Toynbee: List of Twenty-One Societies

Dr. King notes the twenty-one civilizations described in Arnold Toynbee's "A Study of History."

Letter from MLK to David Sutton

Thursday, December 16, 1965

Dr. King regretfully informs Mr. Sutton of his inability to speak at Drexel Institute for the 1965-1966 calendar year. At the time of writing, Dr. King was engaged in non-violent grass roots efforts throughout the South to end racial discrimination. His commitment to community issues would oftentimes force him to refuse public speaking engagements, among other requests.

Letter from Rev. Cyril S. Butterfield to MLK

Monday, September 27, 1965

Reverend Cyril Butterfield invites Dr. King to come speak in Bermuda at the Allen Temple A.M.E. Church.

Letter from E. M. Blaz to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Mr. Blaz writes Dr. King to inform him about the formation of the Negro organization Chicago Central Service Bureau. This organization is an enterprise that includes a variety of programs that offer education towards consumer loans, mortgage loans, travel agencies, insurance, etc.

Resolutions of Institute on Non-Violent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

This document contains SCLC resolutions of July 22-24, 1959, regarding nonviolence. The resolutions include: commending the 50th Anniversary Convention of the NAACP, thanking the staff of Spelman College, and calling upon organizations to "initiate plans against forms of racial discrimination."

Telegram from Dr. Richard Moore to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Dr. Richard Moore, on behalf of Bethune Cookman College, expresses support for Dr. King during the SCLC Voting Rights Campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Advertisement for Why We Can't Wait

This advertisement for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," appeared in the Christian Herald in June of 1964.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

Letter from Congressman Ralph J. Rivers to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Representative Rivers of Alaska informs Dr. King that he intends to sign the District of Columbia Home Rule Bill.

Letter from Elsa Wischkaemper McIntyre to MLK

Sunday, November 3, 1963

Elsa McIntyre writes to Dr. King to seek information on how to contribute to his organization. Mrs. McIntyre was moved by Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech and inquires about obtaining a copy.

Message from Betty Babcock to MLK

Betty Babcock writes Dr. King and discusses similarities in international conflicts before wishing him blessings around the Christmas holiday.

Letter from Ed Jennings to MLK Regarding the Vietnam War

In this letter received February 7, 1966, Jennings enlightens King on the pro-war and anti-war activities taking place at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Jennings is a representative of the Students for a Democratic Society(SDS). Jennings is requesting that Dr. King reply with a short message which the SDS can use during their anti-war activities.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Bennett

Friday, May 13, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Jean Bennett on behalf of Dr. King expressing his regards for offering to donate a substantial portion of the royalties from the recording of "We Ain't What We Was" to an organization of his choice.