The Archive

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"California (CA)"

An Evening of Music

Sunday, April 15, 1962

The English family provides Ebenezer Baptist Church with "An Evening of Music" in the spring of 1962.

Letter Regarding MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter from Dad to Frank and Mark commends Dr. Kings use of the 'march' as means to secure a better life for the Negro. The author goes on to say the integration benefits both the Negro and whites in the supply and demand of labor.

Telegram from A Philip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

Mr. A. Philip Randolph offers his brotherhood and support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Jefferson County jail.

Letter from Eugene G. Huston to Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Mr. Huston writes to request that the photos of Mrs. King and her daughter which appear on the cover of Life Magazine, April 1968 be widely distributed. Huston believes that if this is done the larger public will be just as moved as he was and further serve to promote the memory of Dr. King.

Letter from Charley Brown to MLK about Wallace Administration

Tuesday, November 1, 1966

In this letter Charley Brown suggests to Dr. King the idea of endorsing Mrs. Wallace for governor of Alabama, arguing that this would actually lose Mr. Wallace a number of votes.


Dr. King labels a quote from Vladimir Lenin "a false dictum."

Letter from the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Bolennart Andersson, President of the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden, sends a congratulatory letter and an invitation to Dr. King to speak to their student union.

Letter from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament to MLK

Canon L. John Collins, a founder of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, invites Dr. King to speak at a rally in Trafalgar Square in London, England. The proposed rally will be based on the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and Collins would like to provide a direct link between the rally and the Washington March through the participation of both Bayard Rustin and Dr. King.

Meet the Press Interview

Sunday, August 13, 1967

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.

Statement by MLK on Perjury Charges

Wednesday, February 17, 1960

Dr. King addresses his indictment for perjury supposedly related to improperly filed Alabama state tax returns. He points out that the tax auditor who assured him that his returns were accurate is the person bringing the charges. He proposes a group of distinguished citizens to review his books and report their findings and concludes by stating that his conscience is clear.

Letter from Marjorie Heins to MLK and Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 14, 1967

Marjorie Heins informs the SCLC that the Campaign for Disarmament, a peace group in Germany, requests for Dr. King to give 5-10 lectures for about 2,000 - 3,000 people.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Monday, April 17, 1967

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

Letter to MLK from Joan Daves

Friday, November 1, 1963

Joan Daves writes Dr. King concerning materials that she received from Harper & Row Publishers.

Letter from Sidney M. Peck to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

On behalf of the University Circle Teach-In Committee, Western Reserve University Professor Sydney Peck invites Dr. King to speak about the Vietnam War at a conference on US foreign policy.

Telegram from Mrs. Terry Brown to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

Mrs. Terry Brown writes Dr. King reflecting on her participation in the Great Freedom March. She also expresses to Dr. King how his words are a source of inspiration.

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King quotes American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regarding the subject of God.

1963 Income Statement for the SCLC

This document is a financial balance sheet for the SCLC for the fiscal period 9/1/63 to 8/31/64. The statement gives a breakdown of revenues and expenses and lists a net deficit of $50,622.59.


Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the topic of immorality.

Letter from Richard W. Boone to MLK

Tuesday, January 11, 1966

A letter from Richard Boone, Executive Director of Citizens Crusade Against Poverty, to Dr. King, enclosing the preliminary draft of the C.C.A.P.'s training proposal to the Ford Foundation.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

Thursday, August 1, 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.


This note card contains Dr. King's notes on the Old Testament book of Habakkuk.

Wall Street Journal: Letter to Editor from J. Chico Ramos

Monday, July 22, 1963

Mexican- American J. Chico Ramos gives his opinion to the Editor of The Wall Street Journal on racial issues in America. He objects to the claims that the Civil Rights Movement is going to help all minorities, because while they may benefit negroes, he doesn't feel they have ever benefitted anyone of his own nationality.


Dr. King gives information on fourth century teacher, Arnobius and his conversion to Christianity.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from E.S. Baker

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

E.S. Baker, manager of the Canadian National Railways, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy requesting a copy of Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech. He began the letter by noting that he was an avid admirer of Dr. King and interested in acquiring some of his other recordings.

Letter from Kenneth Barney to MLK

Monday, August 22, 1966

Dr. Kenneth R. Barney sends this letter of support to Dr. King. Barney expresses his appreciation for King's interpretation of "black power" and admires his wisdom on the country's current state of affairs. He urges Dr. King to keep a "broad perspective" on the problems of American society and civilization. Barney believes that domestic and foreign policies can no longer be considered separately.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding ?Why We Can?t Wait? Royalties

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

In this letter Campe encloses payment from Econ Verlag for ?Why We Can?t Wait? royalties.

Letter from the American Committee on Africa Regarding South Africa's Participation in the Olympics

Thursday, January 11, 1968

George M. Houser, Executive Director of the American Committee on Africa, informs readers of the International Olympic Committee's upcoming meeting that will discuss the 1968 Olympics. Mr. Houser encloses a paper regarding the history of South Africa and the Olympics to help urge the committee to reconsider granting South Africa permission to participate in the Olympics.