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Letter from Mary Hart to MLK

In one of three letters Mary Hart sends Dr. King, she thanks him for his efforts in assisting poor people in America. Hart says that she is representing all poor people and sends apologies that she will not be present for the March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from John D. Reinheimer to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mr. Reinheimer, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Wayne County Interfaith Commission on Human Rights, inquires about Dr. King's response toward debasing remarks made about him by Ohio Congressman John M. Ashbrook. The author states that the Commission does not agree with Mr. Ashbrook's comments and would like to assist in refuting them.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King notes that Kierkegaard reversed the Hegelian dialectic.

God

Dr. King elaborates on Thomas Aquinas' views on the existence of God.

Operation Breadbasket Pamphlet

This pamphlet describes the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Operation Breadbasket initiative.

Letter from Irving Frank to MLK

Irving Frank urges Dr. King to continue speaking out against the Vietnam War. Frank also encloses a check in support of Dr. King.

Letter from Frederick G. Dutton to MLK Regarding the Oral History Project

Thursday, February 27, 1964

Frederick G. Dutton, by request of Robert Kennedy, contacts Dr. King to discuss the Oral History Project for the John F. Kennedy Library. Mr. Dutton informs Dr. King that Berl Bernhard will be communicating with him to arrange a proper interview time.

Letter from Muriel N. Bishop to MLK

Saturday, November 2, 1963

Muriel N. Bishop, President of the Manitoba branch of Voice of Women, invites Dr. King to "address a public meeting" in Winnipeg at his earliest convenience. She expresses their interest in learning about his philosophy and efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Handwritten notes on the Personality of God

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on personality of God. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

Get Well Letter from Olive Andrews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, September 23, 1958

Dr. King received this kind get well letter from Mrs. Olive Andrews, noting that she and her family prayed for his healing. She, furthermore, expressed that something good might come out of his unfortunate situation.

Letter from George Graham to MLK

Thursday, September 1, 1966

Mr. Graham thanks Dr.King for replying to his letter, and expresses how much he enjoyed seeing him when he visited Raleigh.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Letter from Reverend Virgil W. Glanton to SCLC

Saturday, June 18, 1966

In this letter, Reverend Virgil Glanton gives a contribution to SCLC and offers support for the Meredith March.

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

Tuesday, December 1, 1959

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

Letter to the Public of Montgomery, Alabama

The ministerial leaders of Montgomery address the problems of discrimination and segregation within the city's bus system. The ministers form a plan of action to eliminate such practices and attain a equal society for all.

Hell-for the Liberal

Dr. King quotes a definition regarding hell. The definition states that hell is a consequence not a punishment. The notecard ends with a statement about youth's perspective of the world.

Knudson, Albert C.

Dr. King cites a work by Christian theologian, Albert Knudson.

Background of the Speakers

This document lists speakers for rallies in New York and San Francisco and gives a short biography of each person. The speakers include people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock, Dr. King, Rev. James Bevel, Floyd McKissick, Julian Bond and others. The document also lists folk singers for each rally location, a list that includes Pete Seeger.

Letter from Lynn Ewell to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. about Comments on College Course

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

In this letter Lynn Ewell inquires as to whether Dr. King will offer any comments pertaining to the college course "Education of the Adolescent" and the class research topic of "Building an Enduring Peace."

Letter to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Here Mrs. L. Schmidt, acting through the office of Joan Daves, requests that Dr. King write an inscription in his book "Why We Can't Wait" for her son, Joachim.

Telegram from George M. Houser to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966

In this telegram, dated April 12, 1966, Mr. Houser requests Dr. King's help in leading a march on First National Bank of New York. Due to bank loans to South Africa, several hundred students are showing support by withdrawing their accounts.

The Trinity

Dr. King records the definition of "The Trinity" as described on page 43 of "Dogmatics" in Outline by Karl Barth.

Letter from William Ferguson to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

William Ferguson of Prairie View, Texas extends an invitation for Dr. King to address the community. The community of Prairie View is engaged in a multiracial boycott with the aid of many white ministers. They seek Dr. King's appearance to give vitality to their movement.

Monism

Dr. King cites the many ways in which the concept of Monism is applied.

Letter from Ellen Tamaki to MLK

Friday, November 24, 1967

Ellen M. Tamaki, from Berkeley, California, has a list of questions for Dr. King that center on accusations of "merg[ing] the peace movement with the civil rights struggle." The writer references Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War and asks about the motivation for his opinions.

Address to the Montgomery Improvement Association

Monday, December 5, 1955

Dr. King discusses the inequality in America and the Montgomery Bus Boycott. He says that he will work to eliminate discrimination in Montgomery and he encourages the audience to participate and actively seek change as well.

Phillip O. Foss Seeks Permission to Use "Letter from Birmingham Jail"

Sunday, February 12, 1967

Philip O. Foss writes to Dr. King in hopes of receiving permission to use excerpts from the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in his new text book.

Postcard From Jesse Jackson to MLK

Jesse Jackson doubts that Dr. King will be able to bring God to Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Friday, July 23, 1965

Kenneth B. Keating, the Chairman of the Population Crisis Committee, invited Dr. King to join the committee. The organization seeks to help deal with the growing population and ever scarcer resources.