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Letter from Milton S. Eisenhower to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966
New York, NY

This letter from former President Eisenhower's brother Milton, on behalf of Planned Parenthood World Population, requests that Dr. King serve the organization in order to "lend important moral support."

The American Jewish Committee Press Release


This press release covers statements made by Morris B. Abram, President of the American Jewish Committee. At the start of Rosh Hashonah, Abrams stated that the deterioration of the cities should be seen as a top priority for the federal government. He also states that the committee will continue to fight for the protection of civil and religious rights of Jews, particularly in the Middle East and Soviet Russia, the improvement of race relations, and global peace.

Memorandum from Alfred Duckett to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

This memo addresses fundraising events that Mr. Duckett wishes to pursue.

Telegram to MLK from W.E. Gardner

Thursday, August 16, 1962

Rev. Gardner organizes a board meeting to plan for a Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention.

Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 22, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

This letter informs fellow members of the Spring Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam of the successes of their organization and serves as a call to action on the upcoming steps.

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Lawrence Greene

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
New York (NY)

In this letter, Mrs. Lawrence Greene offers encouragement to Mrs. King. As such she writes, "You have today made yourself a woman among women. In your time of grief you thought not of yourself but of us that cry in the night."

Senator Mark Hatfield Address on Vietnam

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this address to the Harvard Young Republicans Club about the Vietnam War, Senator Mark O. Hatfield provides historical background on the conflict, defines the driving force of Ho Chi Minh as nationalism not Communism, and recounts the numerous times the U.S. has spurned overtures to negotiate a settlement. He proposes a political settlement after a suspension of bombing and de-escalation of the war. Hatfield first publicly opposed the Vietnam War as Governor of Oregon; he was the first prominent Republican to express opposition.

Letter from MLK to C. I. C. Bosanquet

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Dr. Bosanquet for being awarded an honorary degree from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Dr. King deeply appreciated being considered for the degree and for the generous hospitality he received while at the university.

MLK/SCLC Fundraising Letter and Response

Wednesday, December 27, 1961
Atlanta, GA, California (CA)

Bruce and Gertrude joins send their support and contribution on the back of the SCLC fundraising letter they received. They refer to the "old sociological truth that one cannot keep a person in the gutter without needing to stay in there himself to keep the other down there," and thank Dr. King for leadership that liberates both Negro and White.

Letter from SNCC's Judy Richardson to Coretta Scott King

Sunday, September 5, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Judy Richardson of SNCC writes to Mrs. King to give her a copy of the new Negro history primer, "Negroes in American History." The book serves as a method of teaching children about African American history while tying in elements of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Frank Schiffman to MLK

Monday, August 9, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

Frank Schiffman of the Apollo Theatre in New York, New York, sends Dr. King a large check to start the "Dr. Martin Luther King Freedom Fleet."

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This pamphlet describes the SCLC's Citizenship Education Program. The SCLC provides information on the purpose of the school, first class citizen preparation and the characteristics of an ideal candidate for training.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites Vergilius Ferm’s “First Chapters in Religious Philosophy.”

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous author criticizes Dr. King's stance on the American economy and the current status of the Negro.

Letter from Rev. Jesse H. Williams to MLK

Tuesday, July 20, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

Reverend Jesse H. Williams, Pastor of Saint Luke Community Christian Church, invites Dr. King to speak at his church.


Dr. King quotes two verses from the book of Leviticus.

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

Invitation to Harry Belafonte Concert

Friday, May 25, 1962
Johannesburg, South Africa, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King invites friends to a Harry Belafonte concert, which is a benefit performance for the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Solomon Mendelson

Monday, January 8, 1968
New York (NY)

In this letter, Dora McDonald is responding to Solomon Mendelson. McDonald expresses her excitement that Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech will be televised.

Anonymous Letter to MLK


Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mary V. Leath

Tuesday, February 2, 1965
Ohio (OH), Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald informs Mary Leath of Dr. King's current incarceration in Selma, Alabama. McDonald also tells Leath that her request will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return.


Dr. King contextualizes the speed of God.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964
New York, NY, FRANCE, Atlanta, GA

Dancer, singer, and actress Josephine Baker writes Dr. King to share her views on the current political climate of the United States of America. Her belief is that the best chance of retaining and continuing the progress made by John F. Kennedy is to re-elect Lyndon B. Johnson for President and Robert Kennedy as a New York Senator.

Desegregation and the Future

Saturday, December 15, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This document contains the first eight pages of Dr. King's address at the annual luncheon of the National Committee for Rural Schools at New York's Commodore Hotel in 1956. In it, he condemns segregation as an evil which has been allowed to exist in American life for too many decades. Dr. King points out that many states now stand in opposition to desegregation, and the federal government and the Supreme Court must now face how to make this new legislation a reality.

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1961
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Telegram from Reinhold Niebuhr to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965
New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regrets that a stroke prevents him from accepting Dr. King's invitation to participate in the Selma-to-Montgomery March and hopes there will be "massive" support.


Dr. King quotes William Pepperell Montague's "Ways of Knowing."

103:24 General Correspondence 1967 (S)

Monday, May 1, 1967
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Addressed to Sigrid L. Sharp, this receipt is forwarded to Minneapolis, MN for a donation of $3.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Note Explaining Reason for Coming to Los Angeles

Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Georgia (GA), California (CA)

This document explains that Dr. King came to Los Angeles at the invitation of major organizations and concerned individuals.