Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Cambridge, MA"

Letter from Emily Barton Arrabee to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963

Ms. Arrabee sends a check to Dr. King not for the SCLC, but for Dr. and Mrs. King to use to treat themselves in some way. Arrabee suggests a book, a new record or dinner together. The check is a token of her respect and admiration for both Dr. and Mrs. King.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Socorro Santos

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Tuesday, October 10, 1967

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief

Monday, December 4, 1967

The American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief requests that Dr. King join them in sending medical supplies to North Vietnam. They also explain the difficulties they are receiving from the government to obtain a Treasury Department License which would enable them to assist in the war relief. Lastly, the committee informs Dr. King of how other churches have made generous contributions to help with relief for the Vietnam War.

Telegram from J.C. Willimas and George Moore to the National Education Association of America

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Mr. Williams writes to the National Education Association of America requesting an immediate investigation take place on behalf of the Atlanta School System. He suggests that discriminatory practices are present.

Spring Mobilization Committee Information Sheets

These information sheets concern the Spring Mobilization Committee's rally taking place within the United Nations. Topics discussed include meals, housing, and child safety.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Nancy Atkinson of Time Magazine to MLK

Wednesday, April 29, 1964

Nancy Atkinson sends Dr. King a duplicate of the Time Magazine cover honoring him as the Man of the Year for 1963. He is informed that the cover will be a part of a traveling exhibit of other Time covers.

Letter from Marlys Michels to MLK

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Miss Michels informs Dr. King that she will no longer contribute to the SCLC. She disagrees with Dr. King's statements on the Vietnam War, as well as his support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Report of the Insurgent Editor's Conference

These minutes of the "Insurgent Newspaper Editor's Conference" record the events of the conference from start to finish. The minutes also describe prominent topics of the conference, including the difficulties publishing an insurgent newspaper on a tight budget, reaching a large audience, and generating powerful content. The minutes end on a positive note: "a good time was had by all."

Letter from Ann Gallagher to Dr. King, January 31, 1967

Tuesday, January 31, 1967

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Ann Gallagher of the Catholic School Div. of Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc, was requesting the copyrights for "Letter from a Birmingham Jail," which would be featured in Father Joseph Novak's, "Christianity Today: A Book of Reading."

Voter Registration Campaige in Atlanta

This document provides a historical reference of voter registration campaigns held in Atlanta, Georgia. The information includes participating organizations as well as strategies and overall goals.

How Do You View the Progress in School Desegregation?

In this special for the New York Times, Dr. King shares his opinion on the progress made in desegregating schools.

Hosea Williams' SCLC Voter Registration Department Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Hosea Williams' Bi-Annual Report from the Department on Voter Registration and Political Education gives an overview of the department's work; lists the field secretaries, project leaders and field organizers; and summarizes SCLC's eight state programs.

Agenda for the SCLC State and Local Leaders

Friday, February 2, 1962

This agenda outlines several topics discussed for the Southwide Meeting of State and Local Leaders. Dr. King, the President of the SCLC, spoke on SCLC's 'People to People' Program.

Highlander Folk School 25th Anniversary Seminar

The Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tennessee, hosts the 25th Anniversary Seminar entitled "The South Thinking Ahead." At the program, Dr. King is scheduled to deliver the keynote address and activities have been set up to entertain the children that may be in attendance.

Letter from The American Foundation On Nonviolence to David Hunter

Thursday, January 18, 1968

The American Foundation On Nonviolence makes an inquiry to the distribution of grant funds from David Hunter.

Letter from Larry T. Wimmer to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966

Larry T. Wimmer, Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University, writes Dr. King seeking information regarding his views on communism and the Civil Rights Movement. He also asks if it is possible to obtain any films regarding the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from L. John Collins to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

John Collins writes to Dr. King to inform him of the record release of Nelson Mandela's speech with its enclosure. Collins continues with reference to the Reverend's visit in Norway, adding a request to mention Mandela's record during this time. In closing, the author reminds Dr. King of a discussion earlier in the year in reference to a trip to Europe, then alternatively requests his itinerary.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dora McDonald regarding copies of books that she requested Dr. King to autograph for the libraries of Mr. Enoch and Mr. Weybright. She asks Dora about their whereabouts and adds a request for Dr. King to autograph a copy for herself.

Letter from Paul Good to MLK

In this letter, Paul Good repeats his first attempt to volunteer as a "press liaison" for the SCLC, and presents Dr. King with his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign.

Letter from Mrs. J. T. Brent to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1963

Mrs. Brent states her support for Dr. King's cause, and asks him to encourage his people not to hate whites. She writes that "hate will destroy you."

Letter from US Attorney Charles L. Goodson to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963

U.S. Attorney Charles L. Goodson informs Dr. King that the Justice Department for the Northern District of Georgia intends to work closely with King by offering facilities and assistance.

Letter from John Hay Whitney to MLK

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

In this letter, Mr. Whitney, Chairman for the Family of Man Award Dinner honoring General Dwight D. Eisenhower, invites Dr. King to join him and other guests on the dais.

Draft of SCLC 1964 Annual Report

This is a draft of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference 1964 Annual Report. The document outlines developments that occurred in pursuits such as voter registration and Operation Breadbasket. The piece concludes with commentary on the future of the organization, specifically "deeper involvement in political action."

Letter from Alma Weil to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Alma Weil expresses deep intolerance for prejudice and further discloses a desire to support Dr. King's efforts.

The Uniqueness of Jesus

Dr. King reflects on the virgin birth of Jesus and how this attribute was used to contextualize his "uniqueness." This reflection later appeared in his essay entitled "What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection" that he completed during his time at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Relationship of State Units to the National Office

This document outlines the relationship between the national office of the SCLC and state level institutions, referred to as "State Units."

Answers in the American Way

Monday, March 25, 1968

This text derives from a television show outlining the facts of the Black Panther Party. In attendance were civil rights activist like Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, H. Rapp Brown and their affiliates within the Civil Rights Movement.

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.