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Letter from John Mack to MLK Requesting Advice

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

In this letter, John Mack asks Dr. King for advice on selecting the proper employment position that would satisfy his desire to contribute to "the perpetuation of social change and Negro progress," while still providing economic security for him and his family.

Letter from Heather Davidson to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Miss Heather Davidson invites Dr. King to speak during the University of Western Ontario's Religion-in-Life-Week.

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Black Power

In the article, Dr. King address the emerging Black Power movement. He feels that this movement will only promote Black extremism and supremacy which would be following in the steps of the White oppressor. Dr. King believes that the tactic of nonviolence is the only way to move through civil injustice and that everyone must collectively work together to achieve the common goal.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Thursday, February 18, 1960

Dr. King's business partner writes to him from the Midtown Office in New York regarding a column in which they are working on. His partner assures Dr. King that the column will be successful and discusses future plans and events to help fund raise and raise awareness about the it.

Social Ethics

Dr. King's references a chapter and verse from the biblical Book of Zephaniah. He notes that the passages concerning social phenomena such as infidelity, pride, selfishness and oppression are still "entirely up to date."

Program from The Poor People's Campaign Committee for Nassau County

Dr. King delivers an address for the Poor People's Campaign Committee of Nassau County.

Letter from Rev. Andrew T. Denholm to MLK

Wednesday, March 17, 1965

Rev. Andrew Denholm of St. Paul's United Church in Paris, Ontario send Dr. King a financial contribution and inquires about the need of northern whites for the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. He also inquires about the possibility of a civil rights worker addressing a group of people in his town.

Check from the SCLC "Crusade for Citizenship" Program

Friday, December 31, 1965

Jimmy Wilson was issued this check from the Crusade for Citizenship organization.

Tillch's Significance

Dr. King records Rhode Island Senator Theodore Greene's opinion that German-American theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich is "the most enlightening and therapeutic theologian of our time."

Progress

Dr. King notes and comments on a quote from James H. Robinson's "The New History" on the eternal law of progress.

Letter from MLK to Dorothy O. Bucklin

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Dr. King graciously declines Mrs. Bucklin's invitation to speak in Green Lake, Wisconsin under the "auspices" of the American Baptist Convention. Mrs. Bucklin serves as Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Society.

Sermon Introductions by MLK

Dr. King frames a series of introductions to sermons that includes such selections as Civilization's Great Need, Life Is What You Make It, and Why Religion?

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Finch to Mr. M. Nance, Jr.

Friday, February 16, 1968

This letter, dated February 16, 1968, was written to Mr. M. Nance, Jr. from Mrs. Finch. In this letter, she states that while the situation in Orangeburg is "regrettable" it can be fixed. She says that other ethnic groups would not lead demonstrations as blacks have. She says black people lack "imagination and energy''. Finch states that while she believes blacks have suffered "grievances, she has contempt for so-called "free loaders".

Telegram from John P. O'Rourke to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

John P. O'Rourke writes Dr. King to express his support of the Southern Baptist Convention.

Letter from Judith Brockhart to MLK Regarding a Fine Relief

Monday, October 2, 1967

In this letter Judith Brookhart appeals to Dr. King and the SCLC for aid in paying fines accrued from being arrested during civil rights marches.

Letter from MLK to Eugene Saunders

Tuesday, April 3, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation from Eugene Saunders to speak in Virginia for the Central Civic Forum. He refers Mr. Saunders to Jack O'Dell for voter registration literature.

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Letter from Alfonzo Henderson to Afro-Americans

This letter from ARIDO (Afro-American Resource Industrial Development Organization) president Alfonzo Henderson outlines the organization's program goals.

MLK Speaks to People of Watts

Thursday, August 19, 1965

Dr. King speaks on what it will take to make Los Angeles a better city.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Miracle

Dr. King references the Old Testament Biblical Book of Numbers regarding the topic of miracles.

SCLC Board Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

This document is a proposed agenda for an SCLC board meeting, which includes Dr. King's notes of additional agenda items.

Letter From Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Annual Report

Friday, April 21, 1967

In this letter, Mays informs Dr. King that an Annual Report will arrive soon.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights Address by MLK

Thursday, May 17, 1962

Dr. King speaks at a luncheon launching the Gandhi Society on May 17, 1962, citing the great significance of the day: the anniversary of the US Supreme Court decision declaring school segregation unconstitutional, the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and the centennial of the death of Henry David Thoreau, whose essay on civil disobedience influenced Gandhi. He announces that earlier that day he sent President Kennedy a document seeking an executive order proclaiming all forms of segregation to be a violation of the US Constitution.

Letter from Edinburgh University Debate Club to MLK

Thursday, May 20, 1965

James Douglas-Hamilton, the President of Debate Club at Edinburgh University, sends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at a debate against the motion "That Legislation cannot bring about Integration."

Telegram from Mrs. King on Meaning of Christmas

Thursday, December 19, 1968

Mrs. King expresses sadness that the United States is launching a new dimension in its space program, but spends so little on eliminating poverty, hunger, disease, war and racism.

What's Your Brotherhood Quotient?

National Comics Publications, Inc. publishes this questionnaire as a public service to gauge the attitudes of readers while also enlightening readers about their own xenophobic perceptions. The writer asserts that it is okay to dislike vegetables or insects, but to dislike people is to "hurt them and cheat yourself."

Poor People's Campaign 1968

This is an ad and itinerary for the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.

Statement from Jack Wood Jr. to the National Association of Housing Cooperatives

Saturday, March 19, 1966

Wood commends President Johnson for his call for a Fair Housing Act and the Demonstration Cities Act of 1966 that would provide funds for rehabilitation of urban ghettoes. However, he laments the fact that they are separate bills and the government is accepting applications for the Demonstration Cities program absent a Fair Housing Act.