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Letter from Pierre Servais to MLK and Joan Daves

Tuesday, November 10, 1964
New York, NY, FRANCE, BELGIUM

Pierre Servais writes to Dr. King on behalf of the publishing company that will soon be translating "Strength To Love" in French. Servais would like to know, among other things, if Dr. King will be able to make a stop in Paris or Brussels while he is in Europe. Servais would like to hear from Dr. King as soon as possible concerning a meeting because he would like to launch the French version of "Strength To Love", while Dr. King is in Europe.

Letter from Erskine Caldwell to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964
California (CA)

Noted author Erskine Caldwell congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Caldwell's works, including the highly acclaimed book Tobacco Road, addressed poverty, racism and social problems in his native South.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites Vergilius Ferm’s “First Chapters in Religious Philosophy.”

Letter from MLK to Charles H. Dorr

Friday, January 5, 1968
Wisconsin (WI), New York (NY), SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King writes Charles Dorr acknowledging his support of the young African American men who are boycotting the Olympic games. King states, "the country must concern itself with the plight of all Negroes and not just the privileged few."

Letter from Donna Dlugos to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968
Missouri (MO)

Donna Dlugos of Fontbonne College asks Dr. King about receiving information for Time Magazine's 'Choice 68' campaign.

What Is Man?

This is one of several documents where Dr. King explores the nature of "man." He considers the question "what is man?" to be a timeless concept that "confronts any generation." Dr. King's analysis incorporates Biblical and Shakespearean texts, among other notable references.

Pittsburgh Courier: Mays

Saturday, April 29, 1950
Pittsburgh, PA

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays mourns the recent deaths of Charles Drew and Carter Woodson. Both were highly acclaimed individuals, not only because of their race but also in their areas of study. Drew developed large-scale blood banks during WWI and Woodson cultivated the idea of Black History Month.

Current Magazine

Thursday, August 1, 1963
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, GERMANY, Berlin, Germany, VIETNAM, Iowa (IA), Des Moines, IA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CUBA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Ohio (OH), Connecticut (CT), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, HUNGARY, Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, California (CA), Cleveland, OH, UNITED KINGDOM, ISRAEL, DENMARK, FINLAND, NORWAY, SWEDEN, West Virginia (WV), MEXICO, Arizona (AZ), CHINA, London, England, UZBEKISTAN, Florida (FL), SWITZERLAND, AUSTRIA, BRAZIL, ARGENTINA, CHILE, VENEZUELA, POLAND, CZECH REPUBLIC, UKRAINE

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966
New York, NY

Here Joan Daves informs Dr. King on the availability of Hermine Popper, who will be working on a manuscript with Dr. King.

Letter from Edmond G. Jeffries to MLK

Sunday, January 27, 1963
Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL)

Edmond G. Jeffries writes Dr. King after hearing him speak at the Chicago Sunday Evening Club. Jeffries states, "The injustices that the white man has visited on the colored man for hundreds of years burns my soul." Jeffries expresses that he only wants to be a Christian.

Letter from Ronald Segal to MLK

Sunday, October 10, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), London, England, South Africa

Mr. Segal expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's willingness to sponsor the International Conference on South Africa. He also requests that Dr. King prepare a short paper to deliver at the Conference.

Letter from Lilyann Mitchell to MLK

Missouri (MO)

Lilyann Mitchell wrote this letter of support to Dr. King and included a copy of a poem she had written describing him. She writes that it has been published in multiple newspapers.

Letter from Mr. Joseph Mermel to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, March 18, 1965
New York, NY

In this letter to Mrs. King, Mr. Mermel informs her that a sculptress, Sally Stengel, would like to make a sculpture of Dr. King, given he is one of "two outstanding leaders of the Negro race."

Letter to Mr. Wilkinson from Dr. Schrade

Monday, May 3, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), INDIA, London, England

Dr. Schrade asks Mr. Wilkinson in the NAACP office in New York to pass on a request for Dr. King to write an article for his magazine. Previous Nobel Prize winners have submitted an autograph photo and a short biography to the magazine. In additional to the requested article, Dr. Schrade hopes Dr. King will do the same.

The People Speak

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

The neighborhood residents initiate a self-reliant program entitled, "Self-Help Policy-67 Model", due to the inadequacies within the federal government's Anti-poverty Program and the War on Poverty Program. These individuals are considered "The New Breed" and are working to cease their economic disparities. They correlate the biblical story of Nicodemus to associate the promised land of economic freedom.

Letter from Senator Edward V. Long to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Senator Edward V. Long (D-Missouri) writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter concerning Long's support of the civil rights bill.

Letter from Chuck Barris to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965
Montgomery, AL, California (CA), Selma, AL

Chuck Barris has received national monetary support for the truck rentals used for the Selma to Montgomery March.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."

Race Relations Sunday

Sunday, February 13, 1955
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America writes a message regarding race relations. The message discusses God's stance on prejudice and racism, stating that any prejudice act is against the will of God.

abstract needed

Friday, March 8, 1968
KENYA, TANZANIA, UGANDA, SOMALIA, ZAMBIA, ETHIOPIA, CONGO / ZAIRE, MOROCCO, NIGERIA, NIGER, TOGO, GHANA, LIBERIA, SENEGAL

Ave Maria National Catholic Weekly: A Voice for Harlem

Monday, July 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN), New York (NY), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dan Griffin forwards this letter to Dr. King with an enclosure of a magazine from Ave Marie, entitled "A Voice for Harlem." The magazine includes several topics such as hunger in the United States, the War in Vietnam, and worship in the Soviet Union.

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Louisville, KY

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

Letter to MLK from John Yeatman

Saturday, May 6, 1967
Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Pennsylvania (PA)

John Yeatman sends his gratitude for all of Dr. King's efforts in teaching peace and wishes him well in every endeavor.

Letter from Louise M. Meriwether to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA

Louise M. Meriwether requests an endorsement from Dr. King in protesting the filming of the book "The Confessions of Nat Turner" written by William Styron.

City of Philadelphia News Release - James H. J. Tate, Mayor

Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Members of the Cabinet of Mayor James H. J. Tate of the City of Philadelphia release a statement following the assassination of Dr. King. The Cabinet pledges to rededicate to the establishment of equality and justice, to eliminate poverty and intolerable housing condition, and to provide adequate educational systems and facilities, for all citizens.

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Wyatt Tee Walker

Friday, November 20, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King's secretary sends Wyatt Tee Walker information regarding the upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway.

Letter from William J. Connor to MLK

Saturday, December 2, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King was the recipient of the correspondence from Mr. William J. Connor of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Connor was honored to extend a contribution to the civil rights movement. He went on to extend courtesies to Dr. King's family and Rev. Abernathy.

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

WRAL- TV Broadcast Transcript of Viewpoint show

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

WRAL-TV Viewpoint #1790 is a critical review of the efforts of Stokely Carmichael and Dr. King. The speaker claims Dr. King uses the threat of riots in cities to blackmail the United States Congress into doing the bidding of the Black Power Movement.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Monday, June 6, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Massachusetts (MA), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), GERMANY, JAPAN, Louisiana (LA)

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.