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"Cambridge, MA"

Affidavit of Cleopatra Kennedy

Monday, April 15, 1963

After being arrested in Birmingham for "parading without a permit" in 1963, Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights singer Cleopatra Kennedy gave this notarized affidavit describing the incident.

Letter from MLK to The Farmington Ministerial Association

Monday, January 30, 1967

This letter, dated January 30, 1967, was sent from Dr. King to the Farming Ministerial Association. In this letter, he thanks them for their contribution and apologizes for responding late. Their letter was accidentally placed in a folder entitled "Letters to be filed". He further goes on to state how he wishes they, along with other loyal contributors could know more directly how important their support is to the SCLC and all that it stands for.

Letter from C.G. Gomillion to Dr. Randolph Blackwell

Wednesday, August 18, 1965

C.G. Gomillion writes Dr. Randolph Blackwell requesting reimbursement for paying the bail to release SCLC driver Walter Franklin. Franklin was arrested and released in Tuskegee, but was arrested again in Selma because the SCLC failed to pay his fine.

MLK Thanks Rev. Isaac Green

Wednesday, July 10, 1963

Dr. King writes to Rev. Isaac Green of Central Baptist Church thanking him and his congregation for their contributions to the S.C.L.C.. He explains that without those contributions the conference would not be able to work effectively reach its goals.

Letter to MLK from Wyatt Tee Walker of New York's Canaan Baptist Church

Thursday, August 24, 1967

Wyatt Walker comments on the positive relations between Jews and African Americans and asks Dr. King to support the new nation of Israel.

Mr. & Mrs. John Wesley Dobbs Sends Best Wishes for 1960

This card reflects the various dates in which progress has been made in the struggle for equal rights for all. In this card Mr. & Mrs. John Wesley Dobbs also gives their best wishes for 1960.

Commission on Human Relations of the City of Pittsburgh

Thursday, March 21, 1968

This is a preliminary report requesting an investigation on the cancellation of insurance coverage on business establishments and churches in Homewood-Brushton.

Donation from United States Trust Company

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Franklin D. Roosevelt III arranges to have one thousand dollars sent to the SCLC.

Epitaph for a First Lady: Eleanor Roosevelt

Upon the death of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, Dr. King wrote this epitaph, calling her "a symbol of world citizenship." In addition, Dr. King commends Mrs. Roosevelt for her commitment to humanity.

Pass The Ammunition

Ernie Sheffield voices his opinion on the "Department of War Violence and Brute Force" and the spending of a billion dollars a week on violence. He states that in their spending of valuable money not "even a dime" has been spent on a "Department of Peace, Goodwill and Coexistence."

Resurrection of Jesus

Dr. King writes about John Mansfield's play entitled "The Trial of Jesus."

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.


Dr. King cites Aristotle's ideas regarding matter and form.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Francis Robinson

Wednesday, May 25, 1966

Mrs. King expresses her appreciation for the opera tickets that Mr. Robinson gave to her and Dr. King.

Newsletter from Rev. Ellis Vanderbilt

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

On April 14, 1968, a group of Black and White Christians met to form the first integrated Baptist Church in South Carolina. The congregation bought an abandoned church, however, the church members needed additional financial assistance, so the Reverend Vanderbilt solicited contributions of at least $100.00.

Letter to Ralph Abernathy Offering Suggestions

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

A supporter of the civil rights movement writes this letter to Reverend Abernathy. It is suggested that the Negro leaders of the civil rights movement consider the voting power of senior citizens. In order to get "a massive single solid vote bloc" it would be advantageous to also include the poor population. With this amount of supporters, the writer believes it would be possible to sustain a presidential candidacy. The author continues by telling Abernathy of Russia's economic goal.


Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 31: 29, 30.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Wayne C. Hess

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Rev. Hess and the participants in the Illinois Conference Evangelical United Brethren Church for their contribution to the SCLC.

Introduction of MLK

These notes are from an introduction written about Dr. King and presumably delivered before he gave an address. Dr. King, who remains unnamed, is presented as a man whose record precedes him given that his life and work has had so profound an impact upon his time.


Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.

The Denver Post Reprint "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shaby Clothes"

Thursday, January 25, 1962

In this reprint, of the Denver Post article, entitled "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shabby Clothes", the reader learns that a 13 year old boy did not go to school because he was ashamed by his clothes. The Colorado judge responded with an attempt to get the boy new clothes and reinstated in school.

Letter from Malsenia Armstrong to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Miss Malsenia Armstrong writes to Dr. King requesting help with a "Legislative Action Project" pertaining to Southern Displaced Teachers.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.


Dr. King quotes Psalms 144:4 and comments briefly on this biblical passage.

God (Jeremiah)

Dr. King discusses the creating powers of God.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gates to MLK

Sunday, June 30, 1963

Bob and Betty Gates write Dr. King enclosing a contribution toward his work for freedom and better opportunities for African Americans. The Gates also ask Dr. King's opinion regarding the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.


Dr. King quotes statements from Harry E. Fosdick's "Modern Use of the Bible" regarding the definition of a miracle.

Telegram to MLK from Truman B. Douglass

Thursday, November 24, 1966

Truman B. Douglass, the chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM), informs Dr. King that he has appealed to President Johnson for a meeting regarding the funding of CDGM.

Letter from George W. Monroe to President Johnson

Monday, February 26, 1968

A former employee of the US Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida, George Monroe, writes again to President Johnson regarding an injury he received and the discrimination he was met with in trying to receive his sick pay and disability benefits. President Johnson had given Monroe's complaint to the Commanding Officer of the USNA in Jacksonville, however, Monroe was still facing difficulty getting help and wrote again to President Johnson to ask for his help. Dr.