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Covenant Between Operation Breadbasket and The A&P Company

The Chicago Unit of The A&P Company seeks to build a relationship with the Negro community by implementing equal opportunity employment policies. In return, the ministers of Operation Breadbasket will bring to attention the extensive commitment the A&P Company has to the economic and social future of the Negro community.

God

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosophy, God, and the world. King quotes Dr. Shirley Guthrie, "It is the Lord; let him do what seemeth Him good."

Introduction of MLK

These notes are from an introduction written about Dr. King and presumably delivered before he gave an address. Dr. King, who remains unnamed, is presented as a man whose record precedes him given that his life and work has had so profound an impact upon his time.

Letter from Thomas Maloney to Dora McDonald

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Rev. Maloney thanks Miss McDonald for her assistance and the materials that she sent.

House Resolution 12962

Monday, September 18, 1967

This is a copy of House Resolution 12962, passed by the Ninetieth United States Congress in 1967. This resolution called for the establishment of a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

Telegram from Philip Lenud to MLK

Sunday, December 18, 1966

Mr. Philip Lenud sent this 1966 Western Union telegram to Dr. King regarding a communication matter with Andrew Young.

Letter from Mrs. A. P. Boynton to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Mrs. A.P, Boynton, chairman of the Dallas County Voters League, informs Dr. King of unjust treatment towards colored women employed at Dunn's Rest Home. Due to physical abuse from the rest home's owner Charles E. Dunn, many of the women left. The Dallas County Voters League also requests a sewing machine from Dr. King to assist the women with "gainful employment."

Letter from Florence of Scepter Records, Inc. to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

In this letter, Florence thanks Dr. King for his address at the NATRA Convention. She also encloses a contribution to continue the work of the movement.

Poems Entitled "Black Power," "Beyond Anger," and "Sins Of The Father"

In this document, there are three poems: "Black Power", "Beyond Anger" and "Sins Of The Father".

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

True Democracy

Reverend O. J. P. Wetklo explains his ideas of true democracy, which he gives a Christian foundation and compares to the natural world. He calls true democracy "a perfect brotherhood of man," and he argues that each individual member of society must take responsibility for the whole.

Letter from Paul D. Metzger to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Paul D. Metzger, President of the Student Association at Central High School, writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at a forum concerning the issues of civil rights in America. Dr. King's response to this invitation is enclosed at the culmination of the letter.

Biography of MLK

Margaret B. Young details the events and accomplishments of Dr. King's life.

Syllabus for Christian Social Philosophy II- Kenneth L. Smith

Dr. King earned an A in this course in 1951 and did his presentation on Jacques Maritain. This syllabus contains the reading requirements for the course and directions for a concluding presentation and report.

Telegram to Alan Reitman from MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968

Dr. King informs Alan Reitman of the American Civil Liberties Union that he will sign a statement opposing the House Un-American Activities Committee and the Senate Internal Securities Committee.

Letter from Polly G. to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962

Polly G. writes Dr. King informing him that her class is creating reports on famous people. She has chosen to write her report on Dr. King and asks him to assist her by sending some additional material along with a photograph.

Letter from Florida Writer to President Lyndon Johnson on True Equality

This letter from a Florida resident to President Johnson expresses the writer's views on the nation's racial challenges.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to MLK

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

Calling himself "a pale face Christian," Charles E. Waring writes Dr. King to acknowledge that all Christians must aid African Americans in their fight for fair representation and respect as equal human beings. He denounces whites who condemn Dr. King and asks, "what can we white Christians do to help recover the leadership of the Negro cause to worthy men?"

Men Who Live Differently

James E. Will shares a Christian perspective on conformity and its relation to humanity and God.

Letter from Mrs. Donald H. Hage to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968

Mrs. Hage praises Dr. King's work, particularly his use of peaceful means to accomplish his goals. She also requests information about how best to help at the local level in Colorado.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. William Lawson

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Dora McDonald writes in response to a request from Reverend William Lawson of Texas Southern University. McDonald encloses a biographical sketch and photograph of Dr. King, then relays a message from the Reverend to exclude a reception for him on May 17.

Letter from Mrs. Everett L. Brantley to the SCLC

Friday, June 11, 1965

Mrs. Brantley asks that the SCLC forward an enclosed check for Mrs. Reeb, funded by money raised at a citizens meeting in New Jersey.

MLK and New York Protest Meeting Speakers

Friday, June 2, 1961

The SCLC releases a statement to the media regarding Dr. King and other Southern leaders trip to New York to address a series of mass protest meetings. This document outlines a schedule of meetings and also announces that Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. and Actor Harry Belafonte will join the protest.

Amsterdam Article

This document describes the fight for civil rights in Mississippi in the early 1960's.

Telegram from Floyd B. McKissick to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

In this telegram, Floyd B. McKissick tells Dr. King that he will not be able to attend a march and rally in Chicago due to his schedule.

Letter from Alma Szatmary to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Alma Szatmary writes Dr. King concerning his stance on the Vietnam war. Szatmary writes that it should be prohibited for Puerto Ricans and African Americans to serve as oppressors in Vietnam when they are the ones being oppressed here at home.

"Life" by Eudora V. Savage

In this poem, Ms. Savage expresses her views on "Life."

Letter from Froydis Kvaerk to MLK

Monday, August 29, 1966

Norwegian student Froydis Kvaerk requests a copy of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in fulfillment of a class assignment on Dr. King and the civil rights struggle.

Letter from MLK to Nathaniel Barber

Friday, July 23, 1965

Dr. King thanks Nathaniel Barber for his contribution to the SCLC and gives a brief overview of the work done by the organization.

Welcome to Kennett Square, Dr. King

Thursday, September 15, 1966

The highlighted article of this newspaper clipping reports on Dr. King's upcoming visit to Kennett High School in Chester County, Pennsylvania at the invitation of the Hadley Memorial Fund program committee. The editorial addresses dissenters who object to Dr. King's visit to Kennett Square for various reasons, including perceived threats of civil disobedience and because Dr. King "fails to measure up as cultural material." However, the author insists that Dr.