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Letter from Dora McDonald to Mamie Reese

Monday, January 22, 1968
Albany, GA

Dr. King's assistant writes Mamie Reese to applaud Eartha Kitt's courage in speaking up about what she believes is the cause of “restlessness” and crime in the streets. Kitt spoke out against the Vietnam War at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, the First Lady.

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

Washington, D.C.

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

Spirit

Dr. King records some thoughts on the meaning of "spirit."

MLK in Memoriam

Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

Following Dr. King's assassination, this tribute highlights King's life and the impact he had on the world. It includes a reading from "The Negro American: A Documentary History," an audio recording of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" and his eulogy. test2

Immortality

Dr. King writes a quote from Goethe from Johann Peter Eckermann's "Conversations of Goethe."

Letter from John Shirley to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968
Atlanta, GA, London, England, Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C.

John Shirley, of the Oxford University Cherwell Newspaper, poses a list of questions to Dr. King concerning Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, and the emergence of Black Power groups. Shirley assures the Reverend of his gratitude for any feedback he may provide, and informs him of the circulation of the literature at being well over 10,000 within the University.

Tonight Show Appearance Press Release

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
Washington, D.C.

The SCLC announces that Dr. King will appear on the Tonight Show with Harry Belafonte filling in for Johnny Carson as host. Comedian Nipsey Russell and actor Paul Newman, both active in the civil rights movement, will also be guests. Dr. King looks forward to this opportunity to speak about the upcoming Poor People?s Campaign.

Copernicus

Dr. King discusses how the discoveries of renowned astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus and German philosopher Immanuel Kant revolutionized thinking regarding the human mind. The note card also outlines philosophical views originating from the "analogy of two clocks" referencing prominent thinkers Rene Descartes and Gottfried Leibniz.

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK and Andrew Young

Friday, July 7, 1967
New York, NY, Georgia (GA)

As a result of an automobile accident, Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King and Andrew Young of possible litigation against SCLC.

If I Can Help Somebody

These are the words to a song written in 1945 by Alma Bazel Androzzo that was made famous by gospel singer Mahalia Jackson. Dr. King quotes this song in his Drum Major Instinct sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on February 4, 1968.

Man, a Being of Becoming

Dr. King documents ideas regarding the philosophy of man. Using the metaphor of a "flowing stream," he addresses man's experience from infancy through adulthood.

Letter from MLK to Dr. A.S. Markham

Thursday, January 21, 1965
CANADA

Dr. King apologetically informs Dr. Markham that he will be unable to attend an event held in his honor to receive the Brotherhood Society of Beth Shalom 1965 award.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

Letter from MLK to Robert McDougal, Jr.

Tuesday, December 14, 1965
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Robert McDougal, Jr. for his contribution and support to SCLC and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter from Mrs. Sigrid Sharp to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Sharp commends Dr. King for his open opposition to the Vietnam War. She further requests copies of his April 4, 1967 speech before New York's Riverside Church, in order to raise political awareness and garner support against the war effort.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS)

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Letter from Edinburgh University Debate Club to MLK

Thursday, May 20, 1965

James Douglas-Hamilton, the President of Debate Club at Edinburgh University, sends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at a debate against the motion "That Legislation cannot bring about Integration."

MLK Public Statement on the Poor People's Campaign

Monday, December 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King announces several initiatives of the SCLC. He explains that due to severe displays of discrimination the SCLC and other organizations will continue the non-violent movement with a demonstration in Washington, D.C. Dr. King further paints the picture of inequality among the races by providing several illustrations of discrimination.

Invitation from C.W. De Kiewiet to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

Cornell William De Kieweit invites Dr. King to speak as the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecturer at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Mr. De Kieweit explains the civil rights struggle in South Africa and explains that Dr. King's appearance would be of great help.

"Insight and Outlook..Negro Road to Power"

New York, NY, VIETNAM, Cleveland, OH, Philadelphia, PA

In this article, Joseph Kraft discusses the influences of Blacks voting.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Hans Massaquoi

Chicago, IL

In this telegram, Dora McDonald writes to Mr. Massaquoi from Ebony Magazine, informing him that Dr. King is not left handed.

Letter from Curtis Harris to Affiliates of West Virginia SCLC

Thursday, February 24, 1966
Virginia (VA)

Curtis Harris discloses information regarding Petersburg Improvement Association's sixth anniversary celebration.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy and expresses that "the death penalty is applied to anyone who steals from his brother or carries him away in slavery."

Peace of Mind or Soul

Dr. King quotes French physiologist Dr. Charles Richet.

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Letter from Carl A. Auerbach to MLK

Monday, December 6, 1965
Minnesota (MN)

Carl A. Auerbach has declined to make contributions to the S.C.L.C based on the assumption that Dr. King will use the funds for protest movements "against the American policy in Vietnam."

Death

Dr. King records some notes on death.

Addition to "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence"

This augmentation was intended to be included in Dr. King's "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" essay published in the Christian Century on April 13, 1960. In the appendage, Dr. King discusses the personal afflictions he has endured as a result of his civil rights work including death threats, bombings of his home, and a near fatal stabbing. He states that suffering has a "redemptive quality" and discusses how he transformed his personal suffering into a "creative force" instead of reacting with bitterness.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Friday, August 30, 1957
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.