Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Chester, PA"

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. T. Kane

Monday, March 25, 1968
Delaware (DE)

In this letter, dated March 25, 1968, Dr. King expresses his gratitude for the Kane's generous contribution of one hundred dollars to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation.

Financial Report of the SCLC Home Office - Atlanta, GA, 1965-1966

Monday, August 8, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., North Carolina (NC), Nashville, TN, Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), California (CA), Tennessee (TN)

Jesse B. Blayton provides a summarized financial statement of cash receipts and disbursements for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference from July 1, 1965 to and including, June 30, 1966. This statement lists the allocations of funds for Operation Breadbasket, voter registration and political education initiatives, legal defense, and more.

Fascism

Dr. King paraphrases one of Benito Mussolini's thoughts on fascism in "The Political and Social Doctrine of Fascism.

A Statement to the South and Nation

Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention

Monday, August 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA

A program outlining the course of events for the 10th Anniversary Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966
Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

Strength to Love Royalty Statement

New York, NY, GERMANY

This is a detailed royalty statement from the German language edition of Dr. King's "Strength to Love," published by Christliche Verlag.

Letter from MLK to Peter Servetnyk

Thursday, July 14, 1966
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King declines an invitation from Peter Servetnyk to speak in Toronto.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document boldly declares the stance of the oppressed Negro population of Birmingham, Alabama. Critiquing the validity of democracy, this manifesto speaks to the unjust treatment of the Negro as a second class citizen, including being "segregated racially, exploited economically, and dominated politically."

Letter from Larry Boyd to MLK

Friday, September 24, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Larry Boyd, President of the United Piedmont Society, writes Dr. King in relation to a contribution his organization forwarded to the SCLC. Boyd writes that he has yet to receive a response from the SCLC regarding a donation of $2,000.

Letter from Dudley Babcock to MLK

Saturday, October 14, 1967
Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CAMBODIA, THAILAND, BURMA / MYANMAR, GERMANY, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dudley P. Babcock writes to Dr. King to assure him he supports his civil rights leadership but questions his involvement in the Vietnam War protests. Babcock reminds Dr. King that there are always pacifists who might need to accept war in order to prevent more war, citing the example of Neville Chamberlain and the escalation of violence in World War II.

"In a Word-Now" by MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

In the attainment of civil rights, Dr. King stresses the importance and urgency of "NOW". He further expounds on the immediate and effective actions that should be exercised by the Federal government to better the society.

A Religion of Doing

Alabama (AL)

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church on July 4, 1954. In the sermon, Dr. King asserts the importance of active religion over passive theoretical practice. Citing the Book of Matthew, he maintains that belief and action must be united, as action is the crux of true religion. He proclaims that the church has to be a passage of the "dynamic force" that encourages action of its members.

Notes on Generational Questions

The document, shown here, was briefly handwritten by Dr. King. Some of the writing in the document says, "One of the most important questions raised in any generation is the question.........." The remaining content of the document is unwritten.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Postcard from J. Mason

Mason requests that Dr. King focus more on black youth crime rates, orphan children and other charitable activities within the black community.

Telegram from Johnnie McKinney to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965
Wyoming (WY), Atlanta, GA

Johnnie McKinney telegrams Dr. King to invite him to a fundraising event that is set to occur in Wyoming. McKinney states, "Wyoming needs you to make Reverend Reebs home state a real fortress of equality."

Letter from Charles Merrill to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Cambridge, MA

Charles Merrill, who was Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King that he is sending a donation of $5000 to be used for "either peace or civil rights work" and he concludes by offering his view on Dr. King's philosophy.

Freud

Dr. King draws an analogy between Columbus and Dr. Sigmund Freud in that each discovered a "continent."

Terminated Employee Asks for a Meeting with the SCLC Board

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Meredith Gilbert writes to William Rutherford regarding her termination in January 1968 from employment with SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Goucher College

Friday, June 26, 1964
Baltimore, MD

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's delight in knowing that Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Coucher College will include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on their school's reading list. She urges Dean Dorsey to purchase Dr. King's recent book "Why We Can't Wait," which contains the full text of the letter.

Letter from Charles Chew, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 31, 1966
Chicago, IL

Charles Chew Jr., of the Chicago City Council, has invited Dr. King to join him for a radio interview regarding the topic of "Crash Program on Slums."

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Telegram from Konrad Bloch to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden, Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Konrad Bloch congratulates Dr. King and says he will see him in Stockholm.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

Washington, D.C.

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

Telegram from George Woods to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

George Woods, Vice President of the Philadelphia Branch of the NAACP, telegrams Dr. King regarding his upcoming visit. Woods asks about a rumor being spread that Dr. King would not make the appearance because King was allegedly being hosted by the Quaker Fellowship House. The trip was called off and then rescheduled.

Letter from Arthur Jordan to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965
Georgia (GA), CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Arthur Jordan, General Secretary of St. Thomas Young Men's Christian Association in St. Thomas, Ontario, invites Dr. King to speak at a lecture engagement in Canada.

Suggestions for SCLC Mobilization of Jobs and Income

Friday, February 9, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

This document outlines suggestions given by The North City Congress, a federation of independent groups concerned with North Central Philadelphia. The Congress seeks to enable the community to exercise a strong voice in government and social welfare operations pertaining to the improvement of surrounding ghettos. Included is a summary of recommendations and detailed points of consideration.