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Permission Form from Friendship House to MLK for Signature

Sunday, December 11, 1966

This document, from James G. Duignan of Friendship House, is sent to Dr. King for his signature, granting permission to reproduce, distribute and or sell recorded copies of two speeches.

Letter from Jessie Jackson to C. L. Franklin

Tuesday, February 21, 1967
Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Reverend Jessie Jackson writes this letter to Reverend C. L. Franklin of the New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Jackson expresses his gratitude for Franklin's suggestions and assistance during a recent stay in Detroit. He also appreciates the solidarity exhibited towards the SCLC.

Handwritten notecard regarding Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King records teachings of German theologian and philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher that Dr. King feels "make his theology a religious psychology."

Schleiermacher (What Is the Operation of Grace)

Dr. King records a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher's work "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King agrees that the United Civil Rights Leadership Council should be dissolved.

Letter from Isaac Franck to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963
Washington, D.C., Richmond, VA

Issac Franck extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at Adas Israel. Adas Israel is the largest Conservative Congregation in the Greater Washington area.

Injunction Requested by the City of Birmingham against Protests

Birmingham, AL

The City of Birmingham submitted this "bill of injunction" to the Circuit Court of Alabama to try to stop the sit ins, boycott pickets, and marches led by Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC, and others in April of 1963. After the injunction was granted and served April 10th, they continued their civil disobedience and many more were arrested. From solitary confinement, Dr. King then wrote "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Rev. Charles William Butler to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1961
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King writes to Rev. Charles William Butler of the Metropolitan Baptist Church to acknowledge receipt of his kind letter concerning moral support. Dr. King references his shock of reading about a vicious attack made by Dr. Jackson accusing him of conspiracy. Stating that numerous friends have suggested that the Reverend sue Jackson, Dr. King expresses his decision to be adherent to his basic philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from the Norway-American Association to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Ragnhild Galtung, director of the Norway-American Association, congratulates Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to speak during his upcoming visit to Oslo.

Progress in Race Relations

In this outline for a speech, Dr. King emphasizes the need for continued work in the area of race relations. He argues that it is necessary to abolish segregation for democracy to live.

Press Release from the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Sunday, January 15, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Michigan (MI), Texas (TX), Ohio (OH), Columbus, OH

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty releases a letter to President Johnson signed by numerous civil rights, labor, religious and community action groups calling for him to take leadership in the War on Poverty by increasing funding. The press release also announces a January 26 national meeting in Washington, D.C. to discuss the War on Poverty.

Letter from Nancy F. Oakes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Nancy Oakes writes a letter of support to Reverend Ralph Abernathy and wishes him success with the March for the Poor People's Crusade.

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Nonviolent Leaders

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King, Hosea Williams, and Bernard Lafayette are mentioned and photographed in a newspaper article that has been defaced by external drawings. The article is also covered in adverse commentary about the three leaders.

Letter from Maude Ballou to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958
New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

Maude Ballou, Dr. King's personal secretary at the Montgomery Improvement Association, writes to Dr. King during his recovery at Harlem Hospital in New York, after being stabbed a few days before. Ms. Ballou provides Dr. King a detailed report of pending correspondences awaiting his attention.

Suggestions for SCLC Mobilization of Jobs and Income

Friday, February 9, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

This document outlines suggestions given by The North City Congress, a federation of independent groups concerned with North Central Philadelphia. The Congress seeks to enable the community to exercise a strong voice in government and social welfare operations pertaining to the improvement of surrounding ghettos. Included is a summary of recommendations and detailed points of consideration.

Letter to MLK from Lee Wood

Thursday, May 11, 1967

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King explaining that the Democratic Party and Republican Party are "two shades of the same color." He suggests that because of his qualifications, Dr. King should run for President with Robert Kennedy as his Vice President.

Supralapsarianism

Dr. King provides a definition of the term supralapsarianism.

Let My People Vote

New York, NY, Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Letter from John W. McCormack to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

John McCormack writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his telegram of commendation "in relation to the passage of the Civil Rights Bill in the House of Representatives." McCormack expresses that he hopes he will have the pleasure of seeing Dr. King again.

Letter from W. E. Charlton to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, South Dakota (SD)

W. E. Charlton of the Curtis Publishing Company informs Dr. King of suspicious Saturday Evening Post order subscriptions under his name to different addresses. Charlton explains that they have cancelled the subscriptions and request that he ignore any billing until the fix is complete. Charlton encloses the fraudulent subscription order forms.

Letter from MLK to Earl T. Jefferson

Monday, January 15, 1968
GEORGIA

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Jefferson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and briefly describes the organization's principles and efforts.

Italian Weekly Requests MLK Views on Gandhi

Tuesday, January 3, 1967
INDIA, ITALY, Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The Italian weekly magazine, Mondo Domani, plans to publish a lengthy article on Gandhi. The editors wish to include Dr. King's response to several questions on nonviolence, outlined in this letter from their United States Representative Enzo Viscusi.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Fiscal Facts about SCLC

New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

This brochure outlines financial disclosure information regarding SCLC as a non-profit organization.

Article: "MLK Writes Co-Religionists from Jail"

Thursday, June 13, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

The Witness Magazine published the first of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." The second part will appear in the next issue on June 27, 1963. The article describes Dr. King's letter as "one of those rare 'to-read-twice' documents."

A Plan for Establishing Independently Owned and Operated Businesses in Inner City Areas

New York (NY)

This document explains the need for independently owned and operated businesses in the city of Rochester, NY. It explains the path towards business development and the role that Kodak might play in encouraging that development.

Letter from Jack Egle to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966
FRANCE, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Jack Engle, European Director of the Council on Student Travel, thanks Dr. King for intervening during the "Nuit des Droits Civiques" in Paris. He also informs Dr. King that the ad hoc committee formed for the event will be disbanded at an upcoming meeting.

Telegram from Congressman Charles E. Bennett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Florida Democratic Congressman Charles Bennett informs Dr. King that the Celler Bill does not apply to all states, though he feels that it should. The Celler Bill, introduced by New York Democratic Congressman Emmanuel Celler, would prohibit the purchase of rifles, shotguns and handguns by direct mail.