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Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK about CORE National Convention

Thursday, June 11, 1964
New York, NY

This response letter dated June 11, 1964, was sent from Ms. McDonald, secretary of Dr. King to Mr. James Farmer. She states that while Dr. King will not be able to attend the CORE National Convention, he will send a representative from the SCLC to the meeting.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, November 26, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY), FRANCE, Atlanta, GA

Josephine Baker offers support and encouragement to Dr. King in the civil rights campaign and asserts "without unity there cannot be a solid victory."

Forgiveness

Dr. King writes on the topic of "forgiveness," as mentioned in Nehemiah 9:17.

Letter from MLK to Birch Bayh

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Birch Bayh's support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In addition, Dr. King prays for Mr. Bayh's recovery from his recent accident.

Letter from Ellen Silver to MLK

Massachusetts (MA)

Mrs. Silver writes to Dr. King to inform him that his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" will be edited for the publication of the textbook "The Triple Revolution: Social Problems in Depth."

Letter from Benjamin Newman, Jr. to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mr. Newman offers suggestions to Dr. King and Mr. Al Raby regarding voting registration in Chicago.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the topic of religion and asserts, "religion is a binding force."

Sin

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 1:18-20 indicates that sacrifices are not needed to be saved from sin; willingness and obedience are the way to be saved.

Letter from W. P. Ketterer to MLK

Monday, November 25, 1963

W. P. Ketterer sends Dr. King a contribution to honor the late President Kennedy. He expresses his hope for other Americans to support Dr. King in his efforts.

Letter from Jimmie Wattson to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1962
Virginia (VA)

An inmate at the Virginia State Penitentiary requests Dr. King's help with his legal situation. The sender informs Dr. King that he is serving a fifteen-year sentence for second-degree murder although he did not get a fair trial. He claims he has written government officials to appeal his case, however he cannot "seem to get any consideration." The inmate asks Dr. King to write him back and let him know what information is required for further assistance.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Edward Hill

Tuesday, September 18, 1962
Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the hospitality he received from Reverend Edward Hill during his visit at Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church. Dr. King offers prayers and best wishes for the continued success of Rev. Hill and his congregation.

Letter from Virginia M. Burke & Phyllis M. Banks to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963
Milwaukee, WI, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Virginia Burke and Phyllis Banks express their interest in distributing "The Negro Is Your Brother", better known as "Letter from Birmingham Jail", to Wisconsin leaders to inform them of the goals and aspirations of Dr. King and his following. Burke and Banks explain that while the document had appeared in multiple publications, they feel that it has yet to reach the wide audience it deserves. They ask Dr. King's permission to reprint and distribute the document if he holds the copyright.

Letter From India to MLK

Friday, June 25, 1965
INDIA, New York, NY

Ram Aurangabadkar and Dinkar Sakrikar of India write to Dr. King concerning his civil rights efforts in the United States. As a token of appreciation for Dr. King's work, they offer a bronze statue of Gandi on behalf of their society. Aurangabadkar and Sakrikar request that the statue be placed in a children's park.

Revelation Baptist Church Program for "A Knock at Midnight"

Sunday, September 27, 1964
Cincinnati, OH, Birmingham, AL

This program outlines the Revelation Baptist Church Sunday Worship Service on September 27, 1964. The booklet lists Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth, co-founder of the SCLC, as the church's presiding minister. On this occasion, Dr. King addressed the congregation from the pulpit with the sermon "A Knock at Midnight," which had been published the year before. Dr. King's handwritten notes seem to outline another talk on the back cover.

Letter from Katherine Camp to Dora McDonald

Friday, September 10, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Katherine L. Camp, Chairman for the Fiftieth Anniverdary of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dora McDonald regarding plans for Dr. King's address at the banquet. Mrs. Coretta Scott King is listed as one of the sponsors for the event.

Letter from Smithsonian Institution to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
Washington, D.C.

S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, invites Dr. King to attend the bicentennial birthday celebration of the organization's founder, James Smithson.

Voting in Negro Majority Counties

Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Virginia (VA)

This document contains percentages of registered Negro voters and registered white voters in Negro majority counties in the Southern United States.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elisabeth Babcock

Tuesday, April 27, 1965
New York (NY), Boston, MA, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Elisabeth Babcock regarding the possibility of Dr. King visiting her in New York. Unfortunately, the hectic schedule in Dr. King's travels will not allow him such an opportunity. She conveys their gratitude for the "moral and financial support" Babcock has made for the betterment of the movement.

The Tension Between Life's Palm Sunday and Life's Good Friday

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church in April of 1960. In this sermon he discussed two days of prime importance in the life of Jesus namely Palm Sunday, "the moment of fulfillment" and Good Friday, the day of his crucifixion.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Ralph J. Bunche sends an invitation to Dr. King, asking him to join the International Sponsors Committee at the New School for Social Research in New York City. This committee was developed in honor of Norman Thomas, an advocate for human rights.

Sin

Dr. King provides insight on the "secret of sin."

God the Inescapable

Dr. King references the book of Psalms regarding the topic "God the Inescapable." King speaks about man attempting to hide from God, but ultimately expresses that this impossible to do.

The Modern Negro Activist

Montgomery, AL, GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Alabama (AL), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

How 700 Ibos were Killed by Mistake

Sunday, January 21, 1968
NIGERIA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, EGYPT

This article reports on the massacre of 700 Ibos by federal troops in the Ibo town of Asaba, Nigeria.

Letter from San Francisco Vietnam Committee to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

The San Francisco Vietnam Committee invites Dr. King to speak for their anti-Vietnam War rally. Dr. King would begin making statements against the Vietnam War during the fall of 1965.

Letter from William H. Shell to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1962
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

William H. Shell is preparing an address for a high school graduation and is in need of various documents surrounding Dr. King's organization. Mr. Shell desires to know the detailed goals of the Civil Rights Movement, civil rights techniques, and the education demographics for the early 1960's.

New Left Versus Old Liberals in Battle for Dr. King's Soul

Washington, D.C.

Conservative syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak claim that Dr. King's soul is being challenged by various factions with whom he has associated. Evans and Novak question Dr. King's relationship with Stokely Carmichael by reminding him of his promise never to work with Mr. Carmichael again.

Royalty Statement for Japanese Edition of Stride Toward Freedom

Friday, May 19, 1967
New York (NY), JAPAN, New York, NY

Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the Japanese edition of Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," including the number of copies sold in 1966.