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Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

In Memoriam MLK: New York Times

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This newspaper clipping is one of several full-page "In Memoriam" dedications featured in various newspapers following the assassination of Dr. King. The clippings by the NAACP accompany a letter from the Public Relations Director of the organization to the Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, newly installed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's death.

Telephone Log: January 22

This memo from the desk of Dr. King includes several missed telephone calls noted for his later response.

War in Vietnam Must Be Ended

Friday, December 31, 1965

Marriner S. Eccles, a banker and former governor of the Federal Reserve System, urges an end to the Vietnam War, saying the U.S. is violating international law and has taken over the war to fight communism in Vietnam. He believes the billions spent on war would be more effective in preventing the spread of communism if spent on eliminating poverty and illiteracy in the developing countries.

Letter from Alex Pascal to MLK

Mr. Pascal states that the American people are ignorant to the facts of Vietnam. He praises a recent speech by Dr. King on the subject, and he requests a copy of it.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the US Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a joint telegram concerning an investigation in Lee County, Georgia.

Revision on Preferential Treatment

The document contains an addition to a chapter for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this insert, Dr. King seeks to clear up questions surrounding preferential treatment for negroes. According to the text, "The program of special aid for Negroes and other deprived groups is in no sense discrimination in reverse."

Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

Telegram from Rev T R Albert to MLK

Rev. T.R. Albert, Pastor of Weslay Methodist Church, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, sent Dr. King words of encouragment while he recovered in the Harlem hospital.

Address to the National Bar Association

Thursday, August 20, 1959

Dr. King shares with the National Bar Association of Milwaukee, the history of segregation and why African Americans fight for equality.

Introduction of Senator Edward M. Kennedy by MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Dr. King introduces the SCLC's guest speaker, Senator Edward Kennedy at a conference in Jackson, Mississippi.

Category Time

Dr. King outlines Paul Tillich's view on time.

Letter from Florence Read to MLK

Wednesday, May 5, 1965

Florence Read informs Dr. King that she received news of his Nobel Peace Prize while traveling in the Middle East. She encloses articles from The Jerusalem Times and The Daily Star of Beirut for Dr. King's records.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Beverly A. Asbury

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

In this letter Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rev. Beverly Asbury for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He stresses the importance of supporters' contributions in order to successfully continue the initiative toward unity, justice, and equality.

Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

"Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam" is a sermon Dr. King delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967 in Atlanta. In this draft of the sermon, Dr. King references a previous speech, "Beyond Vietnam," that he delivered to the group "Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam" at Riverside Baptist Church in New York City.

MLK Notes on Ministers Arrest

Dr. King, protested the arrest of three ministers who were advocating for desegregation. He warned that individuals that did not take a stand against oppression will help push the South into 'fascism.'

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."

SCLC Newsletter: April - May 1964

This second volume of the SCLC Newsletter includes a wide variety of articles on the organization's recent interests and activities. The feature article reports the success of the historic Selma to Montgomery march, and other articles touch on the SCLC's efforts to register new voters.

Letter from V. W. Shepard to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

V. W. Shepard admonishes Dr. King for joining the anti-Vietnam War Movement. He explains that prior to Dr. King's joining the movement he considered the Reverend to be "one of the greatest living Americans."

Reader's Digest: Martin Luther King's March on Washington

Monday, April 1, 1968

This April 1968 article by William Schulz warns that the Poor People's March on Washington and the planned disruption of the nation's capital pose an enormous challenge to security forces and may humiliate the country internationally.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunch to Raphael Gould

Thursday, May 13, 1965

Though Ralph J. Bunche agrees with the "Unique Value and Importance of Education for Peace", he is unsure to the effectiveness of the principle.

Statement from MLK Returning from Receiving Nobel Prize

Friday, December 18, 1964

Upon returning from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King issued this statement on segregation, calling it "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Letter from the Baptist Union of Western Canada to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966

The Baptist Union of Western Canada informs Dr. King that they have released him from any obligation to participate in the convention in Winnipeg. The union is conscious of Dr. King's great responsibilities and the difficulty he faces while attempting to make appearances.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Montgomery Improvement Association Press Release About Emergency Conference

Monday, January 7, 1957

This press release from the Montgomery Improvement Association discusses an emergency conference called to address strategies for the integrated transportation campaign.

Transition Period

Dr. King quotes an unknown source that links the transition period to Alfred North Whitehead’s rejection of his earlier view about science and philosophy.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, shares a quotation from W.E.B. DuBois' "The Souls of Black Folk." The excerpt is consistent with Dr. King's view on the importance of "keeping white allies in the civil rights movement."

Letter from MLK to Daniel K. Inouye

Friday, January 24, 1964

Dr. King commends Hawaiian Senator Daniel K. Inouye for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Membership Director's Report to CORE Convention

In this report to the members of CORE, Mr. Robinson outlines the goals for acquiring new contributing associate members and keeping the members they have. It is also concerned with increasing the amount of the donations. The report specifically focuses on membership maintenance, recruitment, growth and the impact of holiday cards.