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"Chicago Theological Seminary"

Prayer Pilgrimage

Various quotes are cited surrounding Dr. King's perception on love, nonviolence, spirituality, Montgomery, and more. Dr. King elaborates on the history of Montgomery and its direct relation to slavery. Ebony Magazine releases the exclusive eight-point "Plan for Freedom" for Montgomery, calling Negros to mobilize for an all-out assault on segregation."The Death of Evil' is also cited which correlates such evil with details from the book of Exodus.

King to Visit Southside Virginia

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

This article describes Dr. King's visit to Virginia on the "people-to-people" tour as a part of the Poor People's Campaign.

Scientific Method and God

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman on the knowledge of God being unscientific. The content of this card appears verbatim in King's doctoral dissertation, "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."


Dr. King outlines principles of Hegel's philosophy regarding rationality and reality.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

This New York writer castigates Dr. King and refers to him as "the worst phoney [sic] in the country."

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

Letter From T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Saturday, December 24, 1966

T. K. Mahadevan, a representative of the Gandhi Peace Foundation, writes Dr. King regarding an upcoming visit to the United States. Some primary interests during his visit includes meeting key Negro leaders, spending time with an average Negro family, and perhaps a few speaking engagements.

Letter from Carroll Whittemore to MLK

Friday, September 25, 1964

Carroll Whittemore inquires about a promotion for Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" to be distributed to roughly 60,000 clergymen. He further requests a photograph of Dr. King to be used for publicity purposes, in a gallery of outstanding ministers.

Letter from Albert Turner to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

Albert Turner requests financial assistance from Dr. King to aid with the voting campaign against Governor Wallace.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Sunday, November 29, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, includes a summary of several foreign contracts drawn on Dr. King's behalf for three of his books.

Letter from Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Thursday, October 29, 1964

Hildegard Goss-Mayr, Secretary for the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invites Dr. King to speak at a conference in Brazil.

Telegram from Harold Stassen to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Harold Stassen, President of the American Baptist Convention and former Minnesota Governor, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He states that Dr. King is the most deserving because he tackles the race crisis through non-violent means.

University of Mississippi at Oxford Crisis

Dr. King discusses the Mississippi crisis after the admittance of James Meredith into the local University.

Letter from Dr. Helen Curth to the MLK Memorial Fund

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Dr. Curth encloses a donation for the Martin Luther King Memorial Fund. She requests that a receipt for $5 be sent to each of her two grandsons so that they may feel connected to Dr. King's memory.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable J. Caleb Boggs

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator James Caleb Boggs of Delaware to commend his role in "forging the bi-partisan unity" that made possible the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

National Sharecroppers Fund Annual Report

Frank P. Graham, chairman of the National Sharecropper's Fund, mails out two separate articles from The New York Times and The New York Post that referencing the organization which supports migrant farm workers. Graham provides factual information pertaining to the proposed legislation to improve living standards for farm workers, and communicates the need for such a proposal.

Letter from MLK to Ruby Brown

Monday, April 4, 1966

Dr. King writes Ruby Brown of Detroit, Michigan to thank her for her letter regarding the civil rights struggle.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to MLK

Thursday, December 19, 1963

Music composer Irwin Heilner corresponds with Dr. King inquiring about the possibility of composing music and setting it to King's "I Have A Dream" speech.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK Regarding Union Merger

Monday, November 21, 1966

Mr. Howard, Vice President of International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of negotiations for the merger of his organization's union and the United Steelworkers of America. If successful, this merger would strengthen the civil rights and labor movements in the South.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. D.A. McGregor

Monday, September 25, 1961

Dr. King expresses delight in Mrs. D.A. McGregor's request for a copy of his sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." However, since he doesn't have a complete manuscript of the sermon at the time he receives the letter, Dr. King mentions that it will be published in his upcoming book of sermons. The book of sermons would eventually be named "Strength to Love."

Nobel Lecture Itinerary

This is an itinerary for the King family for the Nobel Peace Prize luncheon and lecture.

Telegram from MLK to Berry Gordy

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Dr. King congratulates Berry Gordy, Jr. for being awarded the Business Achievement Award from the Interracial Council for Business Opportunity.


Dr. King discusses the concept of religious fundamentalism as it relates to the Christian faith.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Biography of MLK

Margaret B. Young details the events and accomplishments of Dr. King's life.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Dora McDonald inquires about receiving additional copies of the Time Magazine issue that featured Dr. King as the Man of the Year. She informs Otto Fuerbringer that Mrs. King's relatives in her hometown of Marion, Alabama were unable to buy copies of the magazine.


Dr. King writes notes regarding the topic of nature.

Letter of Support from Dorothy Hill to MLK

Saturday, July 1, 1967

Miss Dorothy P. Hill writes this letter to Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where do we go From Here: Chaos or Community?" As previous Director of the Summer Institute for Social Progress at Wellesley College, Hill learned that "skin color seems no bar to congeniality," and she knows of many others who have had similar positive experiences. Hill writes that she admires Dr. King for his principles and leadership ability.

Letter from Eleanor S. Greve to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Eleanor Greve writes Dr. King to express the encouragement and inspiration she and her husband felt while reading a portion of Dr. King's speech in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The speech was given before the Chicago Area Committee for a Sane Nuclear policy.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Judy Richardson

Mrs. King expresses her support for the SNCC's Negro History Primer program. She also provides Miss Richardson with her contact information so that a later meeting can be arranged.