Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Cincinnati, OH"

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968
California (CA), Chicago, IL, Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C., Arizona (AZ), Maryland (MD), Selma, AL, Detroit, MI, Philadelphia, PA, Atlantic City, NJ, Texas (TX), Cincinnati, OH, Cleveland, OH, Los Angeles, CA, Tennessee (TN), GERMANY, CONGO / ZAIRE, AUSTRALIA

An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bill Daniels

Friday, September 29, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald writes Bill Daniels, of WSB-TV, expressing outrage over a cartoon depicting overt racism in a court of law.

Letter from Harl Douglass to MLK and the SCLC

Wednesday, March 9, 1966
Colorado (CO), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Harl Douglass writes in disgust at the position Dr. King has taken on Vietnam War. As a once full supporter of the civil rights movement, he believes that Dr. King "is somewhat unstable and he has made millions of enemies for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference....." Douglass warns Dr. King and SCLC officials that if they continue to go down the same track they will lose support of white moderates.

Letter from Frederick G. Dutton to MLK Regarding the Oral History Project

Thursday, February 27, 1964
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Frederick G. Dutton, by request of Robert Kennedy, contacts Dr. King to discuss the Oral History Project for the John F. Kennedy Library. Mr. Dutton informs Dr. King that Berl Bernhard will be communicating with him to arrange a proper interview time.

People In Action: Nothing Changing Unless

Sunday, January 28, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In his regular column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes in support of a 435 million dollar job training bill that would "salvage a segment of the unemployed and potentially employable."

Letter from Leslie Cohen to MLK

New York (NY)

Leslie Cohen informs Dr. King that Miss Egnal's eighth grade classes from Great Neck South Junior High School in New York have each elected him their "Man of the Year" over all other world leaders.

God

In this note on God's love and faithfulness,Dr. King refers to the Old Testament book of Psalms.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

Saturday, January 30, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, California (CA), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Washington, D.C.

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1959
Johannesburg, South Africa, South Africa, New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

Letter from Patrick V. McNamara to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Pat McNamara, U.S. Senator from Michigan, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude for his letter of recent date regarding efforts to strip the poll tax prohibition from the voting rights bill.

Letter from Clara Urquhart to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964
UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Clara Urquhart invites Dr. King to speak at the Human Right Day Commemoration, sponsored by Amnesty International, on November 9, 1964.

Letter from Sharyl Green to MLK

Saturday, November 9, 1963
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Sharyl Green, a junior at Roosevelt School in Michigan, expresses her admiration for Dr. King's work and inquires if Dr. King could send her his biography. Green also shares a piece of her literary work with Dr. King.

Form Letter Regarding the Civil Rights Movement

In this form letter the author talks about the necessity to eliminate ignorance.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Wyatt Tee Walker, executive assistant to Dr. King writes a response letter to Eugene Cook, the Attorney General of Georgia. Walker asks the Attorney General to provide his office with a list of questions that he would like answered. He also informs Cook that he will release the contents of this letter to the news media to make sure their is a level of transparency.

Letter from W. L. Overholser to MLK

Saturday, August 13, 1966
CHINA, Indiana (IN)

W.L. Overholser of Winnimac, Indiana proposes that the SCLC change its tactics and support the Peace Welfare Party that he is forming. He maintains that, because too few people control too much of the country's wealth, a lack of jobs creates too much feuding and racial prejudice. Overholser argues that neither party can serve both the richest 10%, who control all the wealth, and the other 90% of the country, because the disparity makes most politicians two-faced. Overholser feels that whites and blacks should focus on forming a new party, and asks Dr.

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, MEXICO

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Chicago, IL, Boston, MA

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

The Nobel Couple

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

The cover photo of the December 1964 issue of The American Chronicle captures Dr. and Mrs. King after they discover he was named the winner of the year's Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Hosea Williams to Project Leaders and Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), Pittsburgh, PA, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), Milwaukee, WI, Wisconsin (WI), Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Detroit, MI, Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C.

Hosea Williams, Director of National Mobilization for the Washington Poor People's Campaign, informs each project leader of their immediate supervisors of mobilization.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

Statement from MLK to Time Magazine

Friday, January 12, 1962

Dr. King writes to Time Magazine regarding the President's call for "new civil rights legislation." He expresses the unfortunate lack of originality in the President's statement on the issue and stresses the importance of executive action.

Letter from Mrs. George E. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

The President of the Planned Parenthood Association of Philadelphia expresses disappointment to Dr. King regarding his inability to personally accept the Margret Sanger Award in Human Rights. However, she states that Mrs. King was "a most eloquent substitute." Additionally, she reiterates a request for Dr. King to speak at the Philadelphia Planned Parenthood Association's Annual Luncheon on January 25, 1967.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 31: 29, 30.

Letter From D. Parke Gibson to MLK

Wednesday, July 24, 1963
Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

D. Parke Gibson informs Dr. King that they will be working with International Correspondence Schools. Gibson also feels that home study education could "lead to upgrading of many Negro workers."

Congratulations to MLK from Michael Engel

Saturday, December 19, 1964
Michigan (MI)

In this letter dated December 19, 1964, Michael Engel sends his congratulations to Dr.King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize. He also asks for a picture of Dr.King for his scrapbook.

Ritschl

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl on Christology regarding Jesus' relation to God.

Acrostic Poem About MLK

California (CA)

Adolf G. H. Kreiss shows his immense support and gratitude for Dr. King's fight for equality with an acrostic poem using the initials of the civil rights leader.

Huntley Thomas Writes MLK About His New Production

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Thomas Huntley tells Dr. King that he is the first in Atlanta to get a copy of his new production and asks for Dr. Kings opinion.

Letter from Harry Daniels to President Johnson

Sunday, December 25, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Harry Daniels sends a copy of his letter to President Johnson to Dr. King, granting him permission to reprint it in his publications. In the letter, Daniels urges that in order to advance the freedom and equality of the United States, we must end poverty.