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The Modern Negro Activist

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

Telegram from Dr. King to Senator Ernest Gruening

In this telegram to Senator Ernest Gruening, Dr. King expressed his happiness to serve as sponsor of a peace concert of the Arts that was held at Lincoln Center, January 21, 1968.

Philosophy of Religion

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's definition of the philosophy of religion. Brightman argues that the rational interpretation and comparison of religion is the basis for the philosophy of religion.

Telegram from Rev and Mrs A C L Arbouin to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Reverend and Mrs A.C.L Arbouin offer Dr. King spiritual encouragement during his time in Birmingham Jail.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Co-Op Movements for Black Economic Development

This memorandum sent to Dr. King by Professor St. Clair Drake, is a full proposal for the development/revival of the co-operative movements among negroes in large urban centers.

Letter from Vernal G. Cave to MLK

Thursday, November 21, 1963

Vernal G. Cave informs Dr. King of a cousin's passing and contributes to the SCLC in his memory.

Letter from Ozro T. Jones to the SCLC's C. T. Vivian

Friday, May 28, 1965

Ozro Jones, President of the International Youth Congress, writes C. T. Vivian stating that he sincerely appreciates Dr. King for accepting the invitation to speak at the International Youth Congress in Chicago.

B.F. Randolph

B.F. Randolph, African American preacher and member of the South Carolina Legislature, is honored in this statement for his work against racial discrimination. The documents states that Mr. Randolph fought for the words 'irrespective of race and color,' to be included in the Bill of Rights.

Adverse Letter to MLK

In this letter, opposition is asserted as the author places into question Dr. King's decency and religion.

Letter from Member of SCLC to James Harrison

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

The letter's author encloses copies of recent checks made payable to the SCLC and contact information for individual and organizational contributors.

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to the first chapter of the Old Testament book, Nahum.

Spurrier, William A.

Dr. King cites William Spurrier's "Guide to the Christian Faith."

Thousands Protest Bombings

This article discusses the numerous civil rights demonstrations taking place around the country surrounding the 1963 Birmingham church bombings.

Letter from Daniel Glantz to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968

This letter is from Daniel Glantz of Sweden. Glantz wrote the letter because he was ordered to do so by beings from outer space. According to Glantz the space beings look like angels and the angels would like to meet with Dr. King, whose mission they morally support. Glantz ends his letter by asking Dr. King if he recognizes the cosmic symbol, which is in the upper left-hand corner of the document and appears as a red circle with a white cross topped by a green triangle or pyramid.

Judgment

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the "day of the Lord." According to Amos, this would be a day of judgment, opposed to a day of national exaltation.

Citation for MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1961

This document contains the passage read on the occasion of the conferral of an honorary doctoral degree from University of Bridgeport to Dr. King.

Telegram from George Houser to MLK

Thursday, November 11, 1965

George Houser of the American Committee on Africa urges Dr. King to telegram the President about Rhodesia's unilateral declaration of independence. The Rhodesian government, under Prime Minister Ian Smith, took this illegal action to break from the United Kingdom after days of negotiation with British Prime Minister Harold Wilson. The British sought to give blacks a fair share of power.

Letter from Rose Auguste to MLK

Rose Auguste asks Dr. King for a list of publishers that are open to Negro work. She is looking for a publisher for her manuscript, which has a "spiritual and supernatural theme."

Suggestions for SCLC Mobilization of Jobs and Income

Friday, February 9, 1968

This document outlines suggestions given by The North City Congress, a federation of independent groups concerned with North Central Philadelphia. The Congress seeks to enable the community to exercise a strong voice in government and social welfare operations pertaining to the improvement of surrounding ghettos. Included is a summary of recommendations and detailed points of consideration.

Agenda of the General Committee of the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations

Thursday, January 26, 1961

This document is an agenda and lists meeting minutes regarding the approval of actions, nominations, budget, and miscellaneous items for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations.

Letter from Ruth Frank Rosenwald to MLK

Ruth Frank Rosenwald writes urging Dr. King to commend Robert Kennedy for his advocacy of peaceful alternatives to war and to invite him to issue a joint call for a meeting of civil rights and peace leaders and President Johnson for dialogue on U.S policy in Vietnam, Santo Domingo and West Germany.

Newsday: Poor Listeners

Tuesday, November 15, 1966

The writer issues an indictment of the current Presidential administration for its failure to listen to others' views of the situation in Vietnam.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, August 23, 1965

This statement from Dr. King?s literary agent reflects monies earned from the German pocketbook edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Joseph W. Harb to MLK

Saturday, April 15, 1967

Joseph W. Harb requests a copy of Dr. King's speech concerning the Vietnam War.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964

In this article, written by Robert L. Powers, the author gives his assessment of the book "Why We Can't Wait." Powers provided poignant excerpts from the literature.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

Thursday, June 18, 1964

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."

Why Should SCLC be Departmentalized?

This document defines and discusses the departmentalization of the SCLC. It also outlines the job duties of the following positions: Executive Director, Program Director, Director of Affiliates, Field Secretary, Field Worker, and Subsistence Worker.

Guide for Churchmen in Interracial Conflict Situations

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

In this document, the Southern Field Service encourages church leaders to aid in African American social justice mobilization.