Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Cincinnati, OH"

Should F.E.P.C. Become a Federal Law?

In this draft article Dr. King discusses employment discrimination and the need for the Fair Employment Practices Commission to become legislation.

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

A supporter of the Vietnam War expresses his conflicting views regarding the struggle for democracy in Southeast Asia. In order to combat the brutality of North Vietnamese forces, he insists that American military presence will ultimately prove that "terror cannot succeed as a weapon in Vietnam, we shall discourage it's use anywhere."

Letter from MLK to Dorothy O. Bucklin

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Dr. King graciously declines Mrs. Bucklin's invitation to speak in Green Lake, Wisconsin under the "auspices" of the American Baptist Convention. Mrs. Bucklin serves as Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Society.

MLK on the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable J. Caleb Boggs

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator James Caleb Boggs of Delaware to commend his role in "forging the bi-partisan unity" that made possible the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Theodore R. Britton Jr. to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Theodore R. Britton promotes the candidacy of Dr. King for the pastorship of Riverside Church throughout this letter. Britton also asserts that New York is in need of Dr. King's leadership and sermons.

Quote from AFL-CIO President George Meany

This is a picture of George Meany, President of AFL-CIO, giving an address to the Jewish Labor Committee meeting in Atlantic City, NJ on March 26, 1960. The picture is inscribed with a quote which reads: "What we want for ourselves, we want for all humanity."

Letter from Robert Dent to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Chairman Robert Dent welcomes Dr. King to San Diego County on behalf of the Board of Supervisors. Dent highlights the growth of Southern California in industry as well as the county's work towards equality. Dent also discusses the importance of Christianity in their endeavors.

Letter from Durand R. Kinloch to MLK

Friday, August 4, 1967

Supporter Durand Kinloch describes himself as "an average white graduate student" with two children who wants to continue to support Dr. King's fight for civil rights. He stresses that love and nonviolence are needed more than ever as he witnesses a resurgence of hate in 1967.

Letter from Dr. King to W. Daniels

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. responds to W. Daniels letter regarding a speaking invitation, March 12, 1968. Dr. King regrettably informs him that his intensive schedule restricts his ability to accept speaking engagements, for the next eight or nine months.

Telegram from Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. to MLK

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr. requests the presence of Dr. King to serve on a panel discussing Title VII and Equal Employment. The Department of Labor event also included civil rights lumaniaries such as A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer and Whitney Young. Roosevelt, fifth child of the late president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, served as the Chairman of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from May 26, 1965 to May 11, 1966.

A Chronology of Violence and Intimidation in Mississippi Since 1961

Thursday, April 4, 1963

This pamphlet produced by SNCC includes a number of reported violent attacks and intimidation tactics imposed on black Mississippi citizens from January 1, 1961 through February 4, 1964.

Letter from George Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

George Johnson offers donating the services of his advertising agency to Dr. King as support for the Viet Nam [sic] war referendum in Missouri.

Anti-Semitism, Israel and SCLC:- A Statement on Press Distortions

Sunday, August 27, 1967

This is a document that addresses the impression that the press created reporting that the SCLC was part of a group that condemned Israel and endorsed the policies of the Arab powers. This document also includes the annual report of the president by Dr. King.

The Student Movement and You

This handbill calls for a boycott on Rich's and A & P in response to their discriminatory practices in employment and services to the Negro population of Atlanta, Georgia.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

Letter from Martin Kessler to MLK

Thursday, November 10, 1966

Martin Kessler sends Dr. King an article by Daniel P. Moynihan entitled "Is There Really an Urban Crisis?" Moynihan addresses issues of the economic and social conditions in America in the interview with Challenge Magazine.

Letter of Appreciation from Alabama State Teachers Association to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

The Executive Secretary of the Alabama State Teachers Association expresses his gratitude for services rendered by Dr. King at an Annual Convention via a $500.00 check.

Freedom (Of Choice)

Dr. King quotes Thomas Huxley's "Collected Essays" on the freedom to do right and to do wrong.

Letter from Tom Edward Ross to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Tom Edward Ross informs Dr. King of a piece of artwork he created of Dr. King. An effort to publish the piece in the Houston Chronicle was unsuccessful. Ross seeks Dr. King's assistance in promoting the sale of the piece.

Letter from Dimitri Papaspyrou to MLK

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dimitri Papaspyrou, President of the Parliament, invites Dr. King to Greece to create a better understanding between Greek and American people.

Letter from Freddie Mitchell to MLK

Friday, December 15, 1967

Mr. Mitchell requests Dr. King's assistance in restoring the musical recording rights that have been denied to him.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter Seeger

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Ms. McDonald informs American folk singer,Peter Seeger, that Dr. King will be unable to accept the invitation to appear on a Japan television program in January or February of the coming year. Dr. King asks that Mr. Seeger informs the program host that sometime during the summer would be more favorable for his schedule.

Nelson Rockefeller Telegram to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

In this telegram, New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller's secretary cancels his upcoming appointment with Dr. King.

MLK Address at the Georgia State Capitol Regarding Julian Bond

Friday, January 14, 1966

Dr. King delivers this speech at the State Capitol of Georgia protesting the legislation refusal to seat black politician Julian Bond. King calls this a "grave injustice" particularly since the state legislature of Georgia considers itself protecting the United States Constitution. Dr. King points out the irony of this act and exposes other irresponsible actions of the legislature.

Letter from Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 5, 1968

Solomon Mendelson writes to Dora McDonald to inform her that the "I Have A Dream" speech will be televised and that the Congregation of Beth Sholom will be taking action in seeing that it is properly promoted.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Letter from Walter Jackson to MLK

Thursday, March 11, 1965

Walter Jackson of Lincoln School in Berkley, California writes Dr. King extending his gratitude for the Reverend's efforts in Civil Rights.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gay to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963

Britt and Hagel Gay write Dr. King enclosing a contribution to help him in his "wonderful work."