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Jesus

Dr. King relates a quotation from General Douglas MacArthur to Jesus. According to General MacArthur, "Nobody can stop the irresistible influence of a sound idea." Dr. King argues that, though Jesus was killed, his ideas still live.

Letter from Ed Clayton to Martin Gal

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Michigan (MI), Birmingham, AL

Ed Clayton, Public Relations Director for SCLC, writes Martin Gal, Producer of WMSB TV, to inform him that Dr. King will not be able to make an appearance on his television production because of his focus on the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Hadley Executive Committee to MLK

Wednesday, November 18, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Director of the Hadley Executive Committee, requests Dr. King's participation in the Hadley Memorial Fund lecture.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

Congratulatory Letter from L.K. Jackson to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Indiana (IN)

In this letter, Dr. Johnson writes to Dr. King congratulating him on his tenth anniversary. Jackson states, "...you are the man of the Twentieth Century."

Ave Maria National Catholic Weekly: A Voice for Harlem

Monday, July 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN), New York (NY), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dan Griffin forwards this letter to Dr. King with an enclosure of a magazine from Ave Marie, entitled "A Voice for Harlem." The magazine includes several topics such as hunger in the United States, the War in Vietnam, and worship in the Soviet Union.

God (His Omnipotence)

Dr. King defines omnipotence as meaning that God has the power to carry out His will. He notes that God must hold characteristics of both good and evil and states that few philosophers have acknowledged God's omnipotence.

Our Struggle

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1961
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Mr. Eugene Exman's, expresses disappointment in Dr. King for not having received his manuscript for a forthcoming book of sermons, and urges him to expedite the manuscript.

Letter from MLK to a Young John Lewis

Tuesday, March 5, 1963
Nashville, TN, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes John Lewis, the future activist and U.S. Congressman, to thank him for a previous letter and to offer financial assistance. He discusses the possibility of Mr. Lewis joining his staff in Alabama.

Autograph Request from Donald Koos

Donald Koos of Detroit, Michigan requests an autograph from Dr. King for his collection.

Letter from M. G. Gilligan to MLK and James Baldwin

Saturday, July 6, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Mrs. M. G. Gilligan expresses admiration to Dr. King and Mr. Baldwin for the production of the television program entitled "Perspectives."

Schleiermacher (Attributes of God)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."

The Alberton Family Sends Condolence Offerings

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

The Albertson family sends to Rev. Abernathy and Rev. Young their condolences for Dr. King's death in the form of contribution and encouraging words.

Invitation from Hubb Coppens to MLK

Sunday, August 16, 1964
Atlanta, GA, NETHERLANDS

Hubb Coppens invites Dr. King to make an appearance at West Berlin to address the Dutch students during his time in Europe. Mr. Coppens explains that it is the schools aim to educate their students on world issues.

Royalty Statement for MLK

Tuesday, December 6, 1966
New York, NY, FRANCE

This royalties statement from Joan Daves to Dr. King details the earnings and number of copies sold for the French edition of "The Strength to Love" during the given time period.

Correspondence Letter to Mrs. King from Paul Torres

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student expresses condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from SNCC's Dorothy Miller to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Greenwood, MS

Dorothy Miller of SNCC writes Dr. King informing him of the arson attempt at the SNCC office and thanks him for a previous correspondence regarding the case of Bob Zellner.

Letter from Gordon Bryant to MLK

Tuesday, February 9, 1965
AUSTRALIA

Gordon Bryant, a representative of the Parliament of Australia, extends an invitation to Dr. King to assist the Aboriginal people of Australia in gaining equal rights.

Bloody Sunday

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King recollects events that occurred on "Bloody Sunday" in Selma, Alabama as 525 blacks marching were tear-gassed, clubbed, and beaten by police officers and discusses how television helped the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts that the television helps us all be participants in vital matters and it adds trust and validity to the movement.

The United States and Eastern Asia: The Report of a Conference of Asian Scholars

Thursday, December 28, 1967
JAPAN, CHINA, INDONESIA, MALAYSIA, VIETNAM, SINGAPORE, THAILAND, New York (NY)

Harry D. Gideonse, President of Freedom House, sends Dr. King two reports concerning international relations between the United States and Asia. The first of the two is a report on the international policies that have been implemented between Western nations and the countries of Asia. The second is a report that tracks the progress of freedom throughout those regions.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King writes about Bernard of Clairvaux and his idea of the character of the ideal Christian.

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Langone

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Langone due to other writing commitments for the next several months, Dr. King is unable to accept his invitation to write an article for his journal, Psychiatric Opinion.

Crisis In the Nation

Washington (WA)

Dr. King and Joseph E. Lowery inform an anonymous recipient of an urgent meeting of the SCLC Executive Board.

Letter from Abdul Razak Ahmad to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966
SINGAPORE

Abdul Razak Ahmad requests a message of support from Dr. King for an upcoming event. Ahmad is the president of the University of Singapore's Socialist Club. This letter praises Dr. King for his leadership and also discusses racial problems in Singapore.

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

God

Dr. King expounds on points made about the idea of "God," by Immanuel Kant, William James, and W.E. Hocking.

Letter from Robert Zuckerman to Dora McDonald

Monday, June 24, 1963
Florida (FL), New York, NY

Robert Zuckerman requests a copy of a commencement speech given by Dr. King.

Telegram from Konrad Bloch to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden, Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Konrad Bloch congratulates Dr. King and says he will see him in Stockholm.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Casper I. Glenn

Monday, October 21, 1963
Arizona (AZ), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to Rev. Glenn, President of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, regarding Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech. Dr. King informs him that the Motown Record Corporation has been granted rights of this speech.