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Notecard Regarding Freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his insights on the concept of freedom.

Letter from Adrienne Lombardi to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Adrienne Lombardi writes Dr. King to express her gratitude that he believes everyone owes their first allegiance to God. She also discusses her view on religion and her sentiments regarding the war.

Letter from Joan Daves to Andrew Young

Friday, April 21, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Ms. Daves focuses on Dr. King's speeches and discusses copyrighting issues.

Foreward by MLK: Famous Negro American Series

Dr. King discusses the contributions of Negro Americans to American society, past and present, in this foreward for the publication: Famous Negro American Series.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

Four Top Rights Leaders Considering Africa Trip

Monday, December 18, 1967
NIGERIA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Roy Wilkins, Dr. King, Whitney Young, and A. Philip Randolph, four of America's top civil rights leaders, are considering making a trip to Africa to stop the war in Nigeria. These leaders also serve as members on the call committee of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King sketches notes on "the most original thinker in Danish history."

Letter from MLK to the Nobel Institute

Wednesday, January 25, 1967
Oslo, Norway, VIETNAM

Dr. King nominates Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk from Vietnam, for the Nobel Peace Prize. He describes Hanh's accomplishments and assures that he is "an apostle of peace and non-violence.

Letter from Edna Hedrick to MLK

Sunday, November 8, 1964
Michigan (MI)

Edna Hedrick, writing on behalf of the Ypsilanti, MI, branch of the NAACP, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Monotheism

Dr. King describes monotheism, the belief in the existence of one God, as it compares to Hebrews and Greeks in a civilized world. He quotes Albert C. Knudson from "Religious Teachings of the Old Testament."

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Friday, July 7, 1967
Cleveland, OH

Bayard Rustin informs Dr. King that Sydney Vincent, the Executive Director of the Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland, would like to gather the major Jewish organizational leaders to discuss Dr. King's work in Cleveland, Ohio.

Letter from Wendell Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
North Carolina (NC)

Wendell Thomas sends Dr. King his support along with a copy of the digest for his recent book, "Toward a World Culture."

Negro Pioneers: Booker T. Washington

Virginia (VA), West Virginia (WV), Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Tuskegee, AL, Richmond, VA, Massachusetts (MA)

Lucille A. Chambers tells the story of Booker T. Washington's rise in society from his birth in Virginia to his founding of the Tuskegee Institute and the Negro Business League.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm to MLK about a Humanity Button

Friday, March 1, 1968
California (CA), Washington, D.C.

In this letter Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm enclose a button called the "Pentagon of Humanity," which the Heussenstamm's also sent to the President and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Accordingly the symbol represents “love, unity and wisdom—the community of man.”

Fundraising Letter - SCEF/James A. Dombrowski 12/25/59

Friday, December 25, 1959

The head of the Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) sent out this fundraising appeal to a former donor in 1959. The appeal focuses on fundraising efforts for Southern children with the intent of promoting love and increasing equal educational standards for children of all races.

Crisis and The Church

Montgomery, AL, Johannesburg, South Africa, South Africa, EGYPT, Jackson, MS

Dr. King emphasizes the important role of the Church in the midst of a global political and social shift. He explores in detail the steps necessary to implement changes through the Church and its' constituents.

Letter from MLK to F. A. Bussey

Friday, March 23, 1962
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs the National Morehouse College Alumni President that he will be unable to meet with a group of Morehouse men following his address at Howard University. His schedule is too hectic even though he would enjoy the "hours of fellowship."

Letter from International Institute for Peace to MLK

Sunday, June 12, 1966
Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, AUSTRIA

O. P. Paliwal and Yves Choliere, from the World Council of Peace, invite Dr. King to speak at a session in Geneva about the well being of Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Emily Barton Anable

Tuesday, February 19, 1963
New Hampshire (NH)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Anable for her kind letter and financial gift. Mrs. King asked him to let her know the money will be used to purchase something for the new baby. At the time of the letter's writing, Dr. and Mrs. King were expecting their fourth child, Bernce.

Telegram from David Livingston to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

David Livingston and Cleveland Robinson, on behalf of their district of the AFL-CIO, send encouragement to Dr. King.

Crisis of Culture

Dr. King refers to his note card on "morality" and cites an example of the crisis of culture.

Letter From Christine Heath to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Texas (TX)

Ms. Christine Heath, a high school student, asks for information on how "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, has affected Dr. King.

Letter from Samuel W. Williams to MLK

Wednesday, February 15, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Rev. Samuel W. Williams, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, offers encouraging words to Dr. King.

Letter from M. A. Cross to Marie Goldner

Tuesday, October 1, 1963
Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA)

M. A. Cross, Director of Public and Industrial Relations at Dan River Mills, Inc., informs Mrs. Goldner that Dan River Mills, Inc. does not discriminate against Negroes.

Letter from Samuel S. Backlar to MLK

Friday, October 3, 1958
New York (NY)

Samuel S. Backlar, Chairman of the American Legion New York County Organization, writes Dr. King wishing him a "speedy recovery" and invites him to speak at Abraham Lincoln's 150th birthday celebration.

Mission Development Report

Sunday, January 1, 1967
North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

This report outlines the structure and development of the North Carolina Leadership Training Project.

Letter from Emerson College to MLK Regarding Speaking Invitation

Monday, November 20, 1967
Boston, MA

Emerson College extends Dr. King an invitation to speak at their communication lecture series. The lecture coordinator, Vic Silvestri, assures Dr. King that he will be awarded both an honorarium and travel expenses if he accepts.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harold E. Carlson

Monday, December 23, 1963
California (CA), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Reverend Carlson to thank him for his recent telegram of encouragement and support. Dr. King states, "You may be confident that such reassurance provides us with an additional source of strength." Dr. King also discusses the philosophy of the SCLC.

Letter from Howard Moore Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Mr. Moore, of the Atlanta law firm Hollowell, Ward, Moore & Alexander, congratulates Dr. King on receiving of the Nobel Peace Prize. He goes on to encourage Dr. King and the SCLC to "establish a full fledge non-sectarian four year college and graduate school."

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Friday, November 1, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.