Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Cleveland, OH"

Letter from S.W. McAllister to MLK

New York (NY), Norfolk, VA, Georgia (GA)

Mr. McAllister, a father of three, requests Dr. King's assistance in obtaining a divorce from his wife who is living with another man. Dr. King was an image of hope for many people and often received requests for help in areas unrelated to civil rights.

Funeral

Dr. King quotes Shakespeare's "Hamlet."

Letter from Ludmila Van Sombeek to MLK Regarding Holy Land Pilgrimage

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
North Carolina (NC), ISRAEL

Ludmila Van Sombeek wrote this letter to Dr. King, encouraging him to visit Mount Carmel in Haifa, Israel, during his upcoming visit to the Holy land. She writes that Haifa is home to a shrine to the martyr prophet of the Baha'i Faith.

Letter from Marian Hargrave to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Ms. Hargrave offers her support for Dr. King and his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. She also discusses the religious aspects of the struggle, which she feels give it a deeper meaning.

Letter from Robert L. Brandfon to MLK

Thursday, June 23, 1966
Cambridge, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Mississippi (MS), CANADA

Dr. Robert L. Brandfon, a history professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, requests Dr. King's permission to include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a book for college students entitled "Readings in the History of the South Since 1900."

Note Card Entitled Atheism

Atheism is cited from Sparrier in this note card.

Ethical Relativism

Dr. King outlines an unknown author's views on ethical relativism.

Telegram From Alice Rewald to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 7, 1967
New York, NY

Alice Rewald writes to Dora McDonald in an attempt to meet with Dr. King before departing for France.

Peace

Dr. King writes on the topic of peace.

Women Strike for Peace: How Can You Be Silent?

Thursday, April 1, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), VIETNAM

This newsletter exemplifies the struggle that Vietnamese children faced during the war. It also urges many to protest in order to prevent young children from dying.

Letter from Henry L. Gerner to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Ohio (OH)

Henry Gerner applauds Dr. King on his accomplishments and what he is doing for the Civil Rights Movement. He also invites Dr. King to speak at Bowling Green State University, a request that is echoed in a letter from Donald Stricker.

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

Saturday, July 13, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Oklahoma (OK), Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY)

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Marcel L. Goldschmid about a Book

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
CANADA

In this letter Dora McDonald informs Dr. M.L. Goldschmid that Dr. King will be unable to write the foreword for his book due to an already filled schedule.

God (His Existence: Psalms)

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's existence.

God

ISRAEL

Dr. King writes about Chapter 11 of the Old Testament Book, Hosea, concerning Israel.

Letter from E.M. Fruchter to MLK Regarding Hotel Reservations

Monday, December 12, 1966

E.M. Fruchter is notifying Dr. King of the hotel accomodations made on his behalf. He list the cost of the rooms per night and request a fifty-dollar deposit from Dr. King.

The Future of Integration

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, EGYPT, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

The National Council of Negro Women

Brooklyn, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Minnesota (MN), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL), New York (NY)

This brochure gives a brief overview of the NCNW and the positive results its had on the Negro community.

Tribute to Jimmy Lee Jackson

Friday, February 26, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King edits a draft of a eulogy he wrote in the wake of four girls killed in a bombing at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King applauded these martyrs, for their brief yet powerful appearance on this Earth and their contribution to the "holy crusade for freedom and human dignity." Reiterating these sentiments, Dr. King edits the eulogy to fit the life story of Jimmy Lee Jackson.

Letter from Wisconsin Branch of the NAACP to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1961
Wisconsin (WI)

The Racine Chapter of the NAACP Banquet Committee invites Dr. King to speak at their annual banquet.

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Monday, March 11, 1968
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

An Appeal by Puerto Ricans for Fair Treatment

New York (NY), Brooklyn, NY, Chicago, IL, Connecticut (CT), VIETNAM, PUERTO RICO

This document reviews the economic, political, and cultural disparity of Puerto Ricans. The authors explain the history of American imperialism in Puerto Rico and how Puerto Ricans have been mistreated in the United States, particularly in New York. Criticizing the Vietnam War, the authors suggest focusing the funding used abroad on community building.

Letter from Carleton L. Spier to MLK

Wednesday, January 11, 1967
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), New York (NY), VIETNAM, Alabama (AL)

Spier shares his disapproval of Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell and his concern regarding Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Rev. William J. Shaw to MLK

Wednesday, August 29, 1962
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. William J. Shaw, pastor of White Rock Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, contributes $100.00 to the SCLC and their works involving the Civil Rights Movement.

Forgiveness and Repentance

Dr. King reviews a passage from the Book of Ezekiel regarding forgiveness and repentance. Summarizing the verse, he states that repentance involves an "actual change of attitude" and forgiveness includes forgetting past mistakes.

Letter from Richard B. Specht to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Richard B. Specht requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the importance of Latin for modern day students.

Letter from Michael Bennett to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964
Ohio (OH)

In this letter, Mr.Michael Bennett expresses how delighted the NAACP is knowing Dr. King will lecture on Kent State University's campus.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, May 6, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, responds to Dr. King's telegram regarding the assault of Rev. Paul Chapman. Marshall informs him that evidence has failed to disclose any "violation of a federal criminal statute," so the Department of Justice is unable to take action.

Reviews of Strength to Love

Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

These reviews of Dr. King's "Strength to Love" illustrate King's use of theological beliefs in conjunction with the struggle for civil rights reform.

The State of Alabama - Equal Administration of Justice

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This document addresses issues of discrimination in the South, particularly in Alabama, by state and federal institutions since the Republican Compromise of 1877. The document outlines a response to the many forms of discrimination occurring.