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Birmingham Manifesto

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

Telegram from Nicolas Nabokov to MLK

Friday, May 29, 1964

The mayor of Florence, Italy telegrams Dr. King with hopes that he will accept an invitation to speak at the Mediterranean Colloquium Florence on racial issues occurring in the United States.

Letter from M. R. Cherry to MLK

Friday, September 16, 1966

M. R. Cherry, Dean of the School of Theology of Acadia University, writes Dr. King on behalf of the University inviting him to deliver the Hayward Lectures.

Legal Brief of Robert Greene

Robert Greene, a mixed race individual from New York, appeals his case to the Supreme Court of the United States. Greene asserts that New York investigators and police conspired to violate his civil rights by means of wrongful arrest and detention, even after his innocence became apparent. Furthermore, as Greene is recognized as indigent, his case proceeds "in forma pauperis," or without the burden of court costs and legal fees.

Letter from William Woodall to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Mr. Woodall relays instructions from God concerning Dr. King's next march.

Letter From Harry A. Ploski to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966

Harry A. Ploski writes Dr. King concerning a book he and Professor Roscoe Brown have written. Hoping to solicit endorsement, he encloses a copy of the table of contents and an outline of the topics addressed.

Mysticism

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as an able defense on mysticism.

Recommendation from Laplois Ashford

Friday, March 17, 1967

The Executive Director of the Urban League of Rochester writes this letter of recommendation to the President of United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers on behalf of Bernice Turner.

Letter from Mrs. Julia D. Fields to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Julia Fields is the only Negro stockbroker in Florida and discusses the adversities she has experienced with Dr. King. Mrs. Fields describes this time period as the "worst year of her life" because the whites resent any Negro attempting to move in their neighborhood. Dr. King is addressed to possibly give advice to better her situation and uplift her "let down" spirit.

Letter from Levi Eshkol to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Levi Eshkol, the Prime Minster of Jerusalem, welcomes Dr. King to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter from MLK to John Lee Tilley

Tuesday, October 21, 1958

Dr. King commends Reverend Tilley on writing the preamble of an unnamed document and offers a few minor suggestions for his consideration.

Memorandum

Wednesday, September 7, 1960

This memorandum, sent to Dr. King, expresses the need for a convocation between Negro and white Southern leaders. Recent developments, such as peaceful integration of lunch counters and schools, show that whites are respecting equal rights of Negro citizens more.

Racism Blocks Social Aid to Needy

Sunday, November 12, 1967

Dr. King writes that overcoming inequality in America will require a "revolution in attitude and values." He calls for a guaranteed annual income and a Bill of Rights just for the disadvantaged.

People In Action: A Profound Moral..Continued

Saturday, August 3, 1963

Dr. King challenges the Negro church and its leadership to uphold the morals of the community. He insists that clergymen must speak out guardedly to obtain support.

Temporary Injunction by City of Birmingham Against Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

Judge W. A. Jenkins issues a temporary injunction against Wyatt Tee Walker based on the affidavits of Captain G. V. Evans and Captain George Wall. The order prohibits involvement with "mass street parades or mass processions or like demonstrations without a permit" and any other "acts calculated to cause breaches of the peace" in Birmingham, Alabama.

A Southern Point of View

Eliza Paschall writes this article to express her feelings toward the Georgia legislature's willingness to close down the schools rather than integrate them. Paschall states that "segregation is a disease that infects all parts of a being, human or political." The time for action is now, so that equality can be achieved by all.

Itinerary for MLK

In this correspondence, a list of "appearances" for Dr. King is listed.

Telegram from Planned Parenthood to MLK

Saturday, June 11, 1966

Medora Bass, Planned Parenthood President, asks Dr. King for a response to an invitation to speak at the organization's upcoming annual luncheon.

Negotiation Now!

Negotiation Now is a national citizens' campaign that supports new initiatives to end the Vietnam War. The campaign aligns with the Secretary General of the United Nations, U Thant, who discusses the necessary "cessation" of bombing in North Vietnam to bring about a peaceful political compromise. This flier shares the campaign's views and offers a section for donation information.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

In this letter Badeker writes to McDonald about the advancement from Gummessons Bokforlag for "Where Do We Go From Here."

MLK to Bill Moyers of Newsday

Friday, May 19, 1967

Dr. King writes to Bill Moyers of NEWSDAY and apologizes for not responding to his letter in a timely manner.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Joan Daves reminds Dr. King of her request for an available copy of his "doctors dissertation", for possible national and international publication.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Invitation to Dr. King from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Dr. King is invited to take part in the 1967 13th Annual World Conference of the Japan Council against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs.

God's Omniscience

Dr. King references the Biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's omniscience. King notes that God knows everything before it is even done. This, however, does not have an effect on human free will.

Letter from Josephine Davis to Dr. King

Friday, June 24, 1966

In this letter, Josephine Davis tells Dr. King that they enjoyed the evening he spent with them. She then informs him that their prayers are with him and that he can look forward to financial help from "THOSE".

Letter from H. M. Joshi to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

H. M. Joshi of India communicates with Dr. King following Dr. King's address at Howard University on the subject of nonviolence. He informs Dr. King about Khan Abdul Ghafar Khan and his influence as a nonviolent soldier in India. Joshi also requests a combination of Dr. King's statements and publications surrounding nonviolence.

Letter from Gus C. Zucco to MLK

Friday, October 12, 1962

Gus Zucco writes Dr. King regarding the changes of his schedule in hopes that he will be able to speak in Pennsylvania.

SCLC Minutes

This undated and unsigned memorandum functions essentially as minutes for an SCLC strategy session.

Royalty Statement for a Payot Published Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement for a French-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" documents royalties earned in 1966.