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Anonymous Letter on Chicago Slums

Thursday, February 10, 1966
Chicago, IL

A disgusted city taxpayer from Chicago writes to Dr. King regarding the condition of slums in Chicago. It is believed that Dr. King and other leaders should stop wasting time on marches and teach young Negroes religion.

Letter from J. M. Douglas to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1963
Virginia (VA)

J. M. Douglas, from the Moderators Council of the Progressive National Baptist Convention, thanks Dr. King for his consideration and prompt response to an earlier invitation. Douglas extends another invitation for Dr. King "to come to us, at your first opening available."

Correspondence to Dr. King from Chuck Wallis, 11/15/1962

Thursday, November 15, 1962
New York (NY)

Chuck Wallis, of Keuka College in New York, wrote to Dr. King at the request of Melvin Arnold an executive at Harper and Rowe Publishing Company. In the letter Wallis informs Dr. King of his editing responsibilities for a forthcoming book project highlighting Dr. King's sermons and requests a face to face meeting to discuss revisions.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967
London, England, Atlanta, GA, Stockholm, Sweden, Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference in Stockholm, Sweden surrounding the issue of peace and the Vietnam War. Duff is an official with the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. She thanks Dr. King for meeting with her in San Francisco, California and urges him to attend the conference in Stockholm.

Letter from Mrs. Gossett to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Kansas (KS), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Gossett responds to Dr. King's "Showdown for Non-Violence," an article in Look magazine. She compares welfare and social security to subsidies received by the agricultural, railroad and mining industries. She also encloses an editorial from her local paper that mentions Dr. King.

Letter from Ralph M. Holdeman to MLK Pertaining to a Speaking Invitation

Tuesday, February 21, 1967
New York, NY, Wisconsin (WI), Chicago, IL

In this letter, Mr. Holdeman of the National Council of Churches of Christ, requests that Dr. King speak at the Ecumenical Evangelism Conference in Wisconsin.

Letter from Dr. King to Rev. & Mrs. Sargent

Monday, November 8, 1965
FRANCE

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. & Mrs. Sargent for their efforts in getting him to visit Paris and for their support of funding SCLC.

Letter from MLK to A.S. Grant

Dr. King thanks Elder Grant for the kind remarks from his previous letter and lets him know that due to the business of his schedule as the President of the SCLC, he is unable to devote attention to Grant's proposal.

Excerpt: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" 1967

Sunday, July 2, 1967
Indiana (IN)

The "Quote" publication, from Indianapolis, issued a review of Dr. King's last book. Under the heading, "Book Review in Quotes", a preview of 10 quotations from "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" are listed, in this document. Black power, nonviolence and other subject matters are highlighted in the quotations. Dr. King's book was published and released in 1967.

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968
Iowa (IA)

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

Letter from Gayle E. Talley to Mr. & Mrs. King

Friday, January 6, 1967
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Talley, Credit Manager of the Sheraton-Lincoln Hotel, writes to Mr. & Mrs. King concerning a financial matter. She requests any information regarding the whereabouts of a fellow colleague, Rev. O. L. Holliday.

The United Ministries

Texas (TX)

The prayer ask for God to help people become stronger in Christ while saving them from the evil and violence within the world.

I Have A Dream

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Correspondence: Letter from Joan Daves to MLK- October 14, 1963

Monday, October 14, 1963
New York, NY

Here Mr. Daves advises Dr. King to accept an offer presented to him for the Dutch rights of his novel "Strength to Love" then references two copies of the proposed contractual agreement.

Letter from Lonnie MacDonald to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Lonnie MacDonald, a friend of the King family, encloses a song that she has written for Dr. King. She writes that the song was inspired by his commitment to freedom as reflected by his recent actions in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Elaine Attias to MLK

Monday, November 13, 1967
Los Angeles, California, Atlanta, GA

Elaine Attias of the Jewish Federation Council follows up on a previous request for Dr. King to appear on the television series "Commitment Profiles." She mentions other prominent people who have participated, including former Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion.

Letter to Monsier Sempe from Joan Daves

Thursday, October 17, 1963
New York (NY), FRANCE

This is a letter stating that Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail" cannot be used in any books because Dr. King wants it to appear in his own book first and it cannot be used before a French version of that book becomes available. Any translation and duplication of his letter violates copyright laws.

Telegram from Charles William Butler to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965
Detroit, MI, Baltimore, MD

Charles William Butler, Pastor of New Cavalry Baptist Church, informs Dr. King that he will not be present at a board meeting. The lateness of the invitation and his involvement in Detroit, Michigan prevent his attendance.

Telegram from LD Reddick to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960
Baltimore, MD

In this letter, LD Reddick tells Dr. King that he is a magnificent example to other leaders. Reddick then tells Dr. King to ask the presidential candidates to state their views more specifically.

Letter from P.B. Boorsma to MLK

Friday, August 6, 1965

The president of the Students Almanac Committee of the Free University of Amsterdam is requesting a biographical sketch of Dr. King to feature in their 1965 edition. The committee is featuring Dr. King because he will soon be awarded the "doctor's degree of honour" at the Free University of Amsterdam.

Letter from Frank Van Leemput to MLK

Saturday, December 30, 1967
BELGIUM

Frank Ban Leemput, a high school student from Belgium, requests Dr. King provide signatures for the enclosed photos. Mr. Leemput is creating a biography of Dr. King and is in admiration of his political activism as well as achievements in the field of desegregation.

Monism

Dr. King cites the many ways in which the concept of Monism is applied.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

New York, NY, GERMANY

Joan Daves issued this royalty statement for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C.

This letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton request the Leeds & Northrup Foundation provide a grant to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Chauncey Eskridge includes a tax exempt letter and a copy of the trust instrument outlining the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Both Dr. King and Mr. Bernard Jackson received a copy of this letter.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. S.C. Njonjo

Tuesday, December 1, 1964
SWEDEN, KENYA

Dora McDonald responds to Mr. Njonjo's invitation for Dr. King to attend Kenya's Independence Celebration. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Njonjo that Dr. King is happy to accept the invitation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ethelyn L. Hall

Monday, December 9, 1963
Texas (TX)

Miss McDonald sends Ethelyn Hall information that Dr. King thinks Hall will find helpful.

Memorandum from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Saturday, February 11, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

David Wallace informs Dora McDonald of contributions made to the SCLC from John H. Johnson, George Jones, and Willard Payne, Sr.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."

Insight Broward: Bullets, Backflips & Baby-Talk

Florida (FL)

Moreland Smith forwarded a copy of Insight Broward Magazine for Dr. King to view. In this collection of articles, Jim Corvell expresses his disapproval of Alcee Hastings, a local NAACP lawyer, who was a candidate for the House of Representatives. Coryell heatedly describes his efforts to thwart what he called "the [N]egro racist's political plans.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

The author writes Dr. King and questions his motives for speaking so "rashly" against the conflict in Vietnam.