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Freedom!: A Spiritual Inspiration

New York (NY)

Composer Kenneth A. Roane wrote the song "Freedom," which he dedicated to the fight for civil rights.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, dated October 5, 1966, J. Campe encloses royalty payments for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," "Why We Can't Wait", and "Strength to Love."

Letter from Howard Moore, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Howard Moore, a partner in the Law Offices of Ward, Moore and Alexander, informs Dr. King of the establishment of the Southern Legal Assistance Project (SLAP). Mr. Moore describes how SLAP has already achieved a victory in representing a soldier who was accused of cursing his white officers. He also asks Dr. King to consider being named as an adviser for the project.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK and Others

Thursday, February 29, 1968
New York, NY, NIGERIA

Mr. Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other members of the ANLCA's call committee of vaccinations required when traveling internationally.

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, July 25, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This document outlines the financial statements of the Atlanta home office of the SCLC. The figures are from July 25, 1966 through July 28, 1966.

Christian Social Philosophy

Dr. King focuses on the interrelatedness of Christian social philosophy, Christian ethics and theology. He argues for the rejection of theology that has no social ethics and also contends that ethics must be dynamic.

Letter from John W. Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

John W. Vannorsdall, Chaplain of Gettysburg College, invites Dr. King to come speak at the college located in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

Coretta's Personal Story

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Oslo, Norway, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL)

This telegram, dictated to Charles L. Sanders on the way back from the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremony, contains Mrs. Coretta Scott King's sentimental narrative of her acclaimed relationship with Dr. King. Revealing details that range from their meeting in 1951 through twelve years of marriage, Mrs. King admits she was immediately smitten by Dr.

Letter from Ohio University at Portsmouth to MLK Regarding Choice '68

Tuesday, April 2, 1968
Ohio (OH)

The Public Affairs Forum of Ohio University at Portsmouth requests material from Dr. King for the university's participation in Time magazine's "Choice '68," a nationwide mock presidential election.

Letter from James Hershey to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Joe T. Denman writes Dr. King on behalf of the Citizens For Progress Organization hoping to sponsor a speaking date in Yakima, Washington. Denman requests that the Reverend forward the date that he will arrive.

Essay on Violence and Nonviolence

The impractical and immoral effect of violence and testimony to the moral power and efficiency of nonviolence are discussed in this essay. Violence is recognized as achieving social justice with great results, but not without damage to society. Although a much tougher way of seeking social justice, nonviolence is a more satisfying lasting solution.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

Agenda of the General Committee of the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations

Thursday, January 26, 1961
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, New York, NY, New York (NY), Texas (TX)

This document is an agenda and lists meeting minutes regarding the approval of actions, nominations, budget, and miscellaneous items for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967
New York, NY

Co-Chairman Julian Bond welcomes Dr. King and other members of the SCLC to the National Conference for New Politics. Bond also comments on past civil rights victories, and he mentions future organizational directions.

King's Viet Stand Has Cost Him Some Financial Support

Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

The Associated Press releases this article acknowledging the lack of funding forwarded to the SCLC because of Dr. King's views on Vietnam. The article also discusses how various other civil rights organizations have received more contributions based on the financial support drawn away from Dr. King. However, the article notes that Dr. King emphasizes the imperative link between the civil rights and peace movements.

Religion (Ritschl)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Theology and Science

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as a source on theology and science.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

A critic writes Dr. King defending President Johnson regarding his decisions for the Civil Rights Movement and African-Americans.

Sin

ISRAEL

Dr. King notes that I Chronicles 21:1 says that Satan ordered David to conduct a census but that another account indicates it was the Lord. He questions why it was regarded as sinful to take a census.

Adverse Letter from Mrs. Arthur Kornoelje to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967
Michigan (MI)

Mrs. Kornoelje expresses her loss of faith in Dr. King. Kornoelje objects to the negro race as a whole, and feels that 90% of crimes in Grand Rapids are committed by negroes.

Telegram from LD Reddick to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960
Baltimore, MD

In this letter, LD Reddick tells Dr. King that he is a magnificent example to other leaders. Reddick then tells Dr. King to ask the presidential candidates to state their views more specifically.

Telegram From Avanta Williams to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960
Brooklyn, NY, Atlanta, GA

Avatna Williams, family and friends send their thoughts and prayers to Dr. King when they heard that he would serve a year in jail.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ray Gibbons

Wednesday, December 27, 1961
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald returns a check from Alice E. Gwinn to Dr. King because it is made out to the Council for Christian Social Action, and it needs to be endorsed before Dr. King can deposit it.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King informs Jack Greenberg that he agrees with a plan to dissolve the Leadership Conference.

Memorandum from the Urban Training Center for Christian Mission

Wednesday, March 22, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Pittsburgh, PA, Philadelphia, PA

The purpose of this memorandum from Rev. James Morton and James Twomey was to attempt to get funding for urban renewal. It was the goal of the Urban Training Center for Christian Mission to create low-income housing for those in need.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Smith

Dr. King writes Mr. Smith thanking him for his contribution to the SCLC. He expresses that contributions help American Negroes to "continue in the struggle for freedom and equality."

Letter from Robert Brandeis to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967
San Francisco, CA

Robert Brandies expresses his support regarding the efforts of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Jack Krieger to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Los Angeles, California, New York (NY)

Jack Krieger requests a reprint of Dr. King's speech delivered at the Riverdale Church in New York on the topics of peace and the Vietnam War.

Letter from Robert Lee King to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

A member of Ebenezer Baptist Church expresses concern over Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham Jail. Robert Lee King also shares his wish that he could physically be in jail as well to aid in the "freedom of all Americans." Though nothing in the letter has been blocked out, the letter does contain a stamp of the word "censored."