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Inauguration Response by J. Lynwood Gresham

Friday, November 10, 1967

This document is the inauguration response delivered by Dr. J. Lynwood Gresham of Barber-Scotia College.

Great Neck Declaration of Rededication

The citizens of Great Neck, New York rededicate themselves to the "struggle for equality and justice."

Letter from Martin Sargent to Andrew Young

Wednesday, October 27, 1965

Martin Sargent writes Reverend Young to clarify logistics and planning for an upcoming SCLC international fundraising event to be held in France. Sargent provides a number of French individuals and organizations that can be of possible assistance to this effort.

"Rev. King Jumps Back into the Act"

This article expresses how Dr. King wants to take the attention off of the militants and place the focus back on non-violent expression.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, May 7, 1965

Dr. Mays, President of Morehouse College, writes each of the members of the board to seek an honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters for Dr. J. Curtis Nixon. Nixon was a lawyer and famous labor mediator.

Letter from Angela Reyes to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Angela Reyes offers her condolences to Mrs. King after the death of Dr. King.

The Atlanta United Negro College Fund Inter Alumni Council Flyer

This flyer, from the Atlanta United Negro College Fund Inter Alumni Council, announces its Annual UNCF Statewide Recognition Banquet.

Letter from MLK to Vincenso Lapiccirella

Thursday, January 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. Lapiccirella for his invitation to participate in a program in Florence, Italy.

Letter from Wallace Best to MLK

Sunday, April 25, 1965

Wallace Best encloses a donation to the SCLC but advises against purusing economic boycotts. According to Best, an economic boycott will "greatly demean the conduct of your noble cause....."

Letter from Ann Pooney to MLK

Ann Pooney expresses her sentiments regarding Dr. King's teachings and the state of African Americans. Pooney feels that most blacks have not proven to be good Christians or citizens of the US.

Letter from MLK to Carl Heassler

In this letter, Dr. King offers words of gratitude to Mr. Heassler for his letter of support. He goes on to critique the War in Vietnam with a nonviolent philosophy.

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1967

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Robert Harris to SCLC

Thursday, June 17, 1965

Mr. Harris offers the SCLC assistance from the Michigan Chapter of the Law Students Civil Rights Research Council to research civil rights problems.

Man the Sinner

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from Ernest Gruening to MLK

Friday, May 19, 1967

Democratic Alaskan Senator Earnest Gruening informs Dr. King that he has inserted one of Dr. King's speeches into the Congressional Record, in order to combat misconceptions about Dr. King's beliefs. The speech in question was delivered to the Riverside Church in New York, and it conveyed Dr. King's views on Vietnam. Senator Gruening includes this section of the record with his letter.

Memorandum from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Saturday, February 11, 1967

David Wallace informs Dora McDonald of contributions made to the SCLC from John H. Johnson, George Jones, and Willard Payne, Sr.

Apologist

Dr. King cites information regarding the historical background of the Apologists and their role in defending Christianity.

God

Dr. King describes the power of God.

Letter from Barbara Meredith to MLK

Barbara Meredith communicates with Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham jail. She does not understand why individuals professing to be Christians approve of segregation. Meredith offers her prayers to Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy and others in the midst of the struggle to end segregation.

Ritschl (God)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl’s “The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation.”

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960

Roy Wilkins sends a message of warm wishes on behalf of the NAACP to Dr. King while he is serving a sentence at the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta.

People in Action: Albany Justice

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

Voter Registration and Population Statistics

This document lists statistical data for five southern states. The data categories include the overall voting-age populations, which is further broken down by race and registered versus unregistered voters.

Letter from J. Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964

J. Smith states that Dr. King is a hypocrite who will be punished by God. Smith believes Dr. King to be a Communist agitator who is undeserving of the Nobel Peace Prize. Smith concludes by warning Dr. King to cease his movement or he will be plagued with death just like John F. Kennedy.

Totalitarianism

Dr. King quotes a modern historian on their ideas of totalitarianism.

Prayer

Dr. King notes William James' description of prayer.

Letter from Gitta Gossman to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

The document references earnings from Dr. King's books "Strength to Love" and "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from W. L. Overholser to MLK

Saturday, August 13, 1966

W.L. Overholser of Winnimac, Indiana proposes that the SCLC change its tactics and support the Peace Welfare Party that he is forming. He maintains that, because too few people control too much of the country's wealth, a lack of jobs creates too much feuding and racial prejudice. Overholser argues that neither party can serve both the richest 10%, who control all the wealth, and the other 90% of the country, because the disparity makes most politicians two-faced. Overholser feels that whites and blacks should focus on forming a new party, and asks Dr.

Senator Mark Hatfield Address on Vietnam

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this address to the Harvard Young Republicans Club about the Vietnam War, Senator Mark O. Hatfield provides historical background on the conflict, defines the driving force of Ho Chi Minh as nationalism not Communism, and recounts the numerous times the U.S. has spurned overtures to negotiate a settlement. He proposes a political settlement after a suspension of bombing and de-escalation of the war. Hatfield first publicly opposed the Vietnam War as Governor of Oregon; he was the first prominent Republican to express opposition.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.