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"Columbus, OH"

Letter from William S. Stein to MLK

Friday, May 6, 1966

William Stein informs Dr. King that the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church will be contributing to SCLC.

Telegram from Dick Rettig to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960

Dick Rettig, President of the United States National Student Association, writes Dr. King to express the organization's solidarity with the sit-in movment.

Letter from Roger Threats to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Roger Threats, a student from New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King death. In the letter, Threats describes his own dream, which is an end to fighting.

Letter from James A Mills to MLK

Friday, August 12, 1966

Rev. James A Mills commends Dr. King on his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and includes a donation to the SCLC.

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King discusses the concept of religious fundamentalism as it relates to the Christian faith.

Letter from Napoleon Appleby to MLK

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Napoleon Appleby offers praise and prayers to Dr. King.

National Student Christian Federation Bulletin

Monday, February 29, 1960

The National Student Christian Federation released several bulletins and informational letters regarding the student demonstrations in the 1960s. Herluf Jensen, General Secretary of the NSCF, provides readers with the progress of different trials related to the movement, arrest statistics and institutions involved. Obtaining strong civil rights legislation through Congress is discussed as well.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Wednesday, September 23, 1959

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Press Release for the Southern Negro Leaders Conference

Monday, January 7, 1957

Dr. King, Rev. C.K. Steele, and Rev. F. L. Shuttlesworth called for an emergency conference to strategize and unify further bus desegregation efforts in the south. This is the press release announcing the meeting of the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-violent Integration. The agenda was ambitious, but specific and explicit. One of the outcomes of the meeting was the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, with Dr. King chosen to lead.

Letter from MLK to Rev. James Endicott

Monday, December 18, 1967

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Rev. Endicott's telegram inviting him to speak at a rally in Toronto. He regretfully declines the invitation due to the volume of work with his organization.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Dora McDonald sends Dr. King a list of the letters, telephone calls and voice mails he received while out of the office. She also sent him information on public speaking arrangements and the publishing of books along with the royalties Dr. King would receive.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to commend him for his courage and work in directing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through Congress.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Here, Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, forwards a list of proposed touring cities to Mr. Harry Belafonte. She also comments on a recent special he did entitled, "Laughter."

Letter from J. M. Lawson Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Minister J. M. Lawson Jr. served as director of nonviolent education for SCLC from 1960 to 1967. In this letter to Dr. King he expresses concerns about program efforts for the summer and fall seasons. Mr. Lawson is conscious of the necessary redirection of the project and informs Dr. King that he has recommendations.

To the Gallant Black Man Now Dead

Tuesday, May 17, 1966

This poem titled "To The Gallant Black Men Now Dead" was written by Vincent Harding in dedication to Jimmy L. Williams. Private First Class Williams was an heroic black man killed in Vietnam and was refused burial in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.

Letter from W. F. Washington to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Rev. Washington assures Dr. King that he has his support as a fellow minister for his stand on the Vietnam War.

Hell-for the Liberal

Dr. King quotes a definition regarding hell. The definition states that hell is a consequence not a punishment. The notecard ends with a statement about youth's perspective of the world.

Letter from Ernestine Comegys to SCLC

Monday, April 5, 1965

Ernestine Comegys writes the SCLC in hopes of obtaining commemorative plates of Dr. King containing his biography on the back. Comegys plans to sell the plates at her church.

Letter from Samuel G. Jackson

Mr. Jackson requests assistance with the Minority Youth in a Higher Education project. This particular project is aimed at increasing the number of black and Puerto Rican students at predominantly white institutions.

Save the Children of Mississippi Resolutions

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Barbara Greene issues a memo for the Ad Hoc Committee to Save the Children of Mississippi that includes resolutions to protest federal funding cutbacks of Head Start programs in Mississippi and interpretation of the Green Amendment regarding maximizing participation in such programs by the poor. She attaches a copy of a telegram sent to Sargent Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity.

The Bible

Dr. King records notes regarding Protestant Orthodoxy and its great error in dealing with the Bible.

MLK's Speaker Bureau Contract

Wednesday, October 5, 1966

This Speakers Bureau Contract states that Dr. King has a speaking engagement on October 5, 1966 at the University of Rhode Island.

Letter from Rev. Canon John S. Yaryan to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 13, 1964

Rev. Yaryan writes to confirm Dr. King's appearance at the Grace Cathedral in San Francisco. He asks that Dr. King preach not only for their morning service, but also the evening worhsip service as well.

Letter from J. Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964

J. Smith states that Dr. King is a hypocrite who will be punished by God. Smith believes Dr. King to be a Communist agitator who is undeserving of the Nobel Peace Prize. Smith concludes by warning Dr. King to cease his movement or he will be plagued with death just like John F. Kennedy.

Letter from MLK to Rebecca Taylor

Thursday, December 6, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Rutledge, Pennsylvania in support of the NAACP due to his responsibilities with the SCLC and his pastorate.

Letter from MLK to Art Simmons

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King extends his gratitude to Mr. Simmons for the evening at the Palais des Sports.

Letter from Flournoy Coles to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Flournoy Coles invites Dr. King to come to Fisk University and lead a session of the Honors Program.

SCLC News Bulletin

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

Letter from Mrs. Thomas Walsh to Dr. Roy Enquist

Monday, June 5, 1967

Mrs. Thomas Walsh writes to Dr. Roy J. Enquist regarding an invitation for Dr. King to speak at St. Mary's University, St. Edward's University and the Texas Lutheran College.