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"DENMARK"

Letter from Friends of the SNCC to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965
Wisconsin (WI)

Richard Meier and Lowell Bergman request Dr. King's support for a letter-writing campaign directed at members of the Wisconsin State Senate and Assembly.

Memo from Edwin Berry and Melville Hosch to Freedom Government Conference Members

Wednesday, March 8, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

The United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare details the purpose of the Freedom-Government Conference and outlines the objectives for the scheduled meetings in the spring.

Letter from Alex Miselson to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Alex Miselson suggests that Dr. King, the SCLC, and other leading civil rights group make the education of African American youth a priority.

Letter from Roud Shaw to MLK

Kentucky (KY), VIETNAM

Roud Shaw of Kentucky writes to Dr. King informing him that his defense is "too well written" and should be crafted for a second grade level. Shaw also encloses a self-written article that appeared in the Louisville Courier Journal, in which he affirms his support to Dr. King and asserts that Cassius Clay should not be drafted for military service.

Inter-Faith Mass Meeting

Sunday, June 11, 1967
Cincinnati, OH, Atlanta, GA

This program is for an Inter-Faith Mass Meeting that was co-sponsored by Mt. Zion Baptist Church and Zion Baptist Church. The meeting took place on June 11, 1967 and features Dr. King as the speaker.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Auguste Sabatier's "Outlines of a Philosophy of Religion Based on Psychology and History."

Immortality

"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Letter from Augusta Hill to MLK

Sunday, October 10, 1965
Wisconsin (WI)

Augusta Hill, president of the newly formed Negro American Labor Council, requests that Dr. King visit Racine, Wisconsin in an effort to help address the employment discrimination occurring there.

Annual Report by MLK

Friday, October 2, 1964
Virginia (VA), Richmond, VA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, New York (NY), New York, NY, Maryland (MD), California (CA), San Francisco, CA, EGYPT, Montgomery, AL, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Texas (TX), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA, North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

Religion

Dr. King records a quote on religion from William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Request For Meeting Telegram From Dr. King To Mayor Daley of Chicago

Sunday, March 13, 1966
Chicago, IL

This telegram dated March 14, 1966, was sent to Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley of Chicago from Dr. King. Dr. King asks the Mayor if he can meet with him in city hall, along with other religious leaders. He wants to discuss with the Mayor about considering programs to eliminate slums,expand health services, and to improve employment and job training opportunities for the people of Chicago.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Sunday, March 11, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King congratulate Reverend Ralph Abernathy on his birthday.

Nature of Religion

Dr. King indicates Schleiermacher's view on the nature of religion.

Letter from Zeth Abrahamsson to MLK

Stockholm, Sweden, Berlin, Germany

Zeth Abrahamsson again requests a meeting with Dr. King during his travel to Sweden, though Dr. King had previously communicated to him that his heavy schedule prevented a meeting. Mr. Abrahamsson is responsible for the Baptist Publishing House that printed Swedish and European copies of Dr. King's books, "Strive Towards Freedom" and "Strength to Love."

Evil - Psalms

Dr. King writes on the subject of evil according to the book of Psalms.

Telegram from Henrich Grueber to MLK

Tuesday, December 31, 1963
Berlin, Germany, New York, NY

Henrich Grueber, Dean of Berlin and Gloster B. Current, Director of Branches NAACP extends their gratitude to Dr. King on being named "Man of the Year" by Time Magazine.

Letter from Lawrence J. Rozman to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965
Selma, AL, Detroit, MI

Lawrence J. Rozman, who identifies himself as a white Catholic, is in admiration of Dr. King's avenue of execution to the racial issues in the United States. In addition, Mr. Rozman requests to become a member of the SCLC.

Invitation from Frederick Williams to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Brooklyn, NY

Frederick Williams, Director of the New York City Board of Education, asks Dr. King to appear as a guest speaker on the board's new television station, WNYC-TV.

Letter from Patricia Reid to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Patricia Reid has mixed feelings about Dr. King and the position he has taken. Even though she and her husband agree with this stance on civil rights, they respectfully disagree on his position on the Vietnam War. The Reids believe that Dr. King shouldn't interfere with foreign policy unless he can come up with a viable solution to end the Vietnam War. However, they still feel compelled to contribute to the work of the SCLC, but warn Dr. King that other individuals may not be that sympathetic.

The Forbidden Book of the Century

California (CA)

J. Partyka's book, "Never Come Early" is announced as the "Forbidden Book" of the century. This announcement claims that the book wil "quake the hallowed halls of psychiatry, education and religion."

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter from Rev. Charles William Butler to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1961
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King writes to Rev. Charles William Butler of the Metropolitan Baptist Church to acknowledge receipt of his kind letter concerning moral support. Dr. King references his shock of reading about a vicious attack made by Dr. Jackson accusing him of conspiracy. Stating that numerous friends have suggested that the Reverend sue Jackson, Dr. King expresses his decision to be adherent to his basic philosophy of non-violence.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

Nashville, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Letter from Sympathizer to MLK

Writing under a pseudonym, the author suggests that the world is separate because that is the way that God intended it to be. The author pulls text from the Bible to support this idea. The author believes that society was equal with the separation and there is no need for Dr. King to continue his fight.

God

Dr. King expresses the power of God as being infinite beyond comprehension of man.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Virginia (VA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Thursday, February 8, 1968
Iowa (IA)

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.

Letter from Glenn T. Izutsu to MLK

Friday, November 6, 1964
Hawaii (HI)

Mr. Izutsu, President of the Associated Students of the University of Hawaii, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize and recalls a visit by Dr. King earlier in the year.

Letter from JohnFischer to MLK Regarding an Article in Harper's Magazine

Wednesday, September 26, 1962
New York (NY), Albany, GA

John Fischer of Harpers Magazine informs Dr. King that the Albany Georgia article will not be published in the upcoming edition.

Letter from MLK to Dorothy Cotton

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King requests that Mrs. Cotton present a report on the present status and grant of CEP for an upcoming SCLC executive meeting.