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Letter from MLK to Mr. Hindman

Dr. King informs Mr. Hindman that although they share the same perspective regarding capital punishment, he does not get involved with civil suits, but instead works to change laws.

Invitation to Dr. King from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
JAPAN, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, Tokyo, Japan, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is invited to take part in the 1967 13th Annual World Conference of the Japan Council against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs.

Letter from MLK to Naomi Thomas

Monday, January 8, 1968
South Africa, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, South Africa

Dr. King explains to Naomi Thomas his reasons for supporting athletes who plan to boycott the Olympics.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover thanks Dr. King for his telegram concerning FBI agents in Alabama.

Telegram for Dora McDonald to Sheraton Atlantic Hotel

Saturday, March 17, 1962

This hotel reservation is for Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker.

Religion

Dr. King cites Edward S. Ames' beliefs regarding religion.

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Monday, January 18, 1965
Oslo, Norway

Adlai Stevenson, US Ambassador to the United Nations, thanks Dr. King for a previous letter and for Dr. King's attendance at a reception at the United States Mission. Stevenson also congratulates Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Detroit, MI, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, PA, Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Cleveland, OH, Connecticut (CT), Michigan (MI), Pennsylvania (PA), Georgia (GA), Illinois (IL), New York (NY), Ohio (OH)

The following document lists the members of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty.

Terminated Employee Asks for a Meeting with the SCLC Board

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Meredith Gilbert writes to William Rutherford regarding her termination in January 1968 from employment with SCLC.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Sin

On this note card, Dr. King discusses the repercussions of sin according to Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Hicks to MLK

Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Mary Hicks sends a monetary donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was sent after Mr. Hicks consulted with author Mrs. Boyle about where a donation could be used.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Article Fee

Thursday, November 19, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Ms. Daves encloses Dr. King's fee for his article in the "Saturday Evening Post" and discusses issues concerning future reprints of this particular work.

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Jimerson

Monday, February 25, 1963
Ohio (OH)

Dr. King sends a biographical sketch of himself to Gertrude Jimerson and recommends she obtain a copy of Crusader Without Violence, a biography of Dr. King written by Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick and published by Harper and Row.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Monroe Defense Committee

Thursday, December 14, 1961
Cleveland, OH

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays, the president of Morehouse College, inquires what Dr. King may know about the Monroe Defense Committee.

New York Post: A Poor Show

Thursday, October 27, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

The Modern Negro Activist

Montgomery, AL, GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Alabama (AL), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

SCLC Press Release: 1967 Election Results

Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This SCLC release hails the election of America's first two black mayors, Carl Stokes in Cleveland, Ohio and Richard Hatcher in Gary, Indiana. The release stresses that such men "cannot do the job alone" and condemns efforts in Congress to cut the War on Poverty even as billions are spent on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Leslie Dunbar

Monday, August 22, 1966
New York, NY, Tennessee (TN), Memphis, TN, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes to Dr. Leslie Dunbar to assure her that the SCLC was indeed ready and able to administer CEP Grant Funds for that school year.

Theology

Dr. King cites theologian Emil Brunner's "The Mediator," and discusses the topic of theology as it relates to the church.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

Social Ethics in Psalms

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in Psalms 72.

Letter from British High School Student to MLK

UNITED KINGDOM

Margaret Blenkins, a fifteen year old student from Northumberland, England, writes Dr. King to ask how she can join the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter to Ms. Hoover from Joan Daves

Wednesday, March 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves writes Miss Carol Hoover of the SCLC to coordinate efforts to market and promote Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Agenzia Letteraria Internazionale to Joan Daves

Friday, March 17, 1967
ITALY, New York (NY)

Agenzia Letteraria Internazionale informs Joan Daves of an international meeting on the problems of New Africa in Palermo, Italy. It is noted that Santi Ando & Figli would like for Dr. King to lecture in Rome, Milan, Florence, Torino & Bolgna and provide photographs they may use in their promotion campaign for Dr. King's books.

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service

Sunday, September 11, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service Program outlines the events for September 11, 1966. Dr. King is the guest speaker to commemorate "the retirement of Rev. D. C. Rice from the pastorship of The Union Baptist Church."

Letter from Barry Diamond to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
Florida (FL)

Barry Diamond, Chairman of Choice 68 at the University of Florida, informs Dr. King that his name will be on the ballot and invites him to speak at the University. Diamond explains that Choice 68 is "a national collegiate presidential primary sponsored by Time Magazine."

SCLC Agenda's

Monday, June 26, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Cleveland, OH, Kentucky (KY), Chicago, IL

This is the agenda set out to specific people within the SCLC.

Anonymous Letter to Ralph Abernathy

Reverend Ralph Abernathy received this brief correspondence from an individual asking about a King James Bible. The note advises Reverend Abernathy to read Matthew 26:11.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Tuesday, February 18, 1964
New York, NY, Alabama (AL)

Dora McDonald inquires about receiving additional copies of the Time Magazine issue that featured Dr. King as the Man of the Year. She informs Otto Fuerbringer that Mrs. King's relatives in her hometown of Marion, Alabama were unable to buy copies of the magazine.