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"DENMARK"

Letter from the American Embassy in New Delhi, India to MLK

Friday, September 24, 1965

The Embassy of the United States invites Dr. King to come and visit India for at least a month. He can lecture in his special areas of interests. The embassy states that the best time to come is between November and April.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Edward Greaves

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Miss Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Edward Greaves that additional copies of Dr. King's sermon entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians" are unavailable. She refers Mrs. Greaves to locate the sermon in Dr. King's newly released book "Strength to Love."

Letter from MLK to Donald Lincoln Cook

Monday, February 7, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Cook for letter, in which Cook stated his support of Dr. King's stance against the United States military's involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Herman E. Talmadge to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Senator Herman E. Talmadge expresses his views on the poll tax with reference to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, March 30, 1964

Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

Citizenship Education Proposal

SCLC's Citizenship Education Program issues a five year proposal for the period between 1965 and 1970. The proposal outlines previous successful activities since the inception of the program.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Letter to Ms. Hoover from Joan Daves

Wednesday, March 25, 1964

Joan Daves writes Miss Carol Hoover of the SCLC to coordinate efforts to market and promote Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

People in Action: Most Abused Man in Nation

Saturday, March 31, 1962

This article by Dr. King, published in his "People in Action" series in the New York Amsterdam News, describes the national and local reaction to the Birmingham jailing of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and J. S. Phifer.

Letters from Ambassadors

Dr. King notes the letters that he has received from several Ambassadors. He also notes the confirmed appointments with the Ambassadors.

Letter from Thomas Price to MLK

Thursday, October 8, 1964

Major Thomas Price, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance in retaining his commission and active duty service with the United States Army.

Acknowledgement of Condolences

A standard form of an acknowledgment response, in reference to the receipt of condolences, is highlighted in this document.

Letter from MLK to Stevens Bedding Warehouse

Thursday, August 6, 1964

Dr. King thanks the Stevens Bedding Warehouse of Cicero, Illinois for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He also explains the importance of contribution and how it will help in the fight for civil rights.

Letter from James K. Mbuguah from MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1962

James Mbuguah is a young boy from Kenya who has been accepted into John Hopkins University. James is contacting Dr. King because he does not have the finances to attend the school and would like to receive assistance.

Letter from A3C Johnson to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Mr. Johnson writes to Dr. King requesting a recommendation letter for reclassification. Johnson explains that he is highly affiliated and a notable person must write his recommendation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from C. B. Olmstead to MLK

Tuesday, July 13, 1965

Olmstead writes that he is unable to reconcile Dr. King's support of civil disobedience with his plans for peaceful demonstrations. He contends the purpose of King's sustained agitation is to provoke violence. He feels the Civil Rights Act of 1964 should become the mechanism for opposing discrimination, not further boycotts and sit-ins.

Letter from Verinal Harris to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

Mrs. Verinal Harris pleads for the help of Dr. King regarding the brutal actions of the police against children in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

A Journey of Conscience

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

Letter from Dr. Nickolas W. Dick to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Dr. King expresses regret to Dr. Dick regarding his inability to participate in a series of meetings sponsored by the Conference of Mennonites in Winnipeg, Canada.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Cass Canfield informs Dr. King that his company, Harper & Row Publishers Inc., won't publish Dr. Benjamin E Mays' book of memoirs.

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1961

Mr. Eugene Exman's, expresses disappointment in Dr. King for not having received his manuscript for a forthcoming book of sermons, and urges him to expedite the manuscript.

Telegram from John Barber and Rev. L. C. Filer to MLK

John Barber, President of the New Haven Branch of the NAACP, sends his support to Dr. King while he serves time in Albany County Jail. Barber expresses sympathetic concern and promises to register financial support soon.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Wednesday, May 11, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Ernest Shaefer on behalf of Dr. King to inform him that Dr. King will write him regarding his invitation in the future. She also asks Mr. Shaefer to inform them of the exact date of the meeting and travel expenses for Dr. King and his associate.

Edwin B. Allaire's Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Mr. Allaire informs Dr. King that there are many individuals who would vigorously support him in becoming a presidential candidate.

No, Mr. King: Your Ad in the Times is Not Clear!

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing dissent in his viewpoint on riots.

Letter from The Charlotte News to MLK

Monday, January 3, 1966

George Willhite, of The Charlotte News, asks Dr. King to comment on accusations of him being a communist. A reader had seen a photo of Dr. King at an allegedly communist school in Tennessee. Willhite asks Dr. King to explain the circumstances of the picture.

Hosea

Dr. King writes notes regarding the prophet Hosea and his views of God.

Letter from Culbert G. Rutenber to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Professor Rutenber, of Andover Newton Theological School, writes Dr. King on behalf of Lovic Dean, an African American minister, who has requested Dr. King send him "the best books" to build a library on the subject of pacifism.