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"DOMINICAN REPUBLIC"

Letter from Bruce Macdonald to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967
CANADA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

Brice Macdonald, a writer for Canada's national newspaper "The Globe and Mail," informs Dr. King that he will be travelling to the South to see how it is developing. Macdonald inquires if he can converse with Dr. King or any of his employees who are well informed on the situation in Southern regions.

Statement by MLK & Dr. W. G. Anderson

Wednesday, July 25, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King and Dr. Anderson release a statement declaring a "Day of Penance" for those in the Negro community who have not yet adopted the nonviolent strategy.

Letter from MLK to Joel Crittenden

Dr. King responds to Joel Crittenden's concern about white hatred toward Negroes by making two points: 1) some whites have given their lives in the freedom struggle, and 2) hatred and violence must be met with love and nonviolence.

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
South Carolina (SC), Orangeburg, SC

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Telegram from Roland Wolf

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Atlanta, GA

In this Western Union telegram, Roland Wolf requests Dr. King's appearance on a "conversation show" with one or two writers, allowing an opportunity to learn his views on existing issues.

Science (Its Limitations)

Dr. King notes that while man’s actions as an animal are biological (science), his actions as a person are spiritual and require a spiritual cause, suggesting there is a Creator God.

Memorandum of Agreement for Strength to Love

Monday, April 5, 1965
New York, NY

This document is a signed copy of Dr. King's Memorandum of Agreement for the Spanish edition of "Strength to Love."

Letter from Paul Madsen to MLK

Tuesday, November 5, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

Paul Madsen, Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, offers Dr. King a consulting position with the organization. The organization needs someone to provide guidance on critical decisions, appear at a limited number of speaking engagements, and to make suggestions to the organization as needed. He mentions that the consulting arrangement could be used to help Ebenezer Baptist Church's budget.

Letter from Sigmund Diamond of Political Science Quarterly to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968
New York (NY)

Sigmund Diamond asks Dr. King if Political Science Quarterly can re-print his review of Ronald Segal's "The Race War: The World-Wide Clash of White and Non-White."

Letter from MLK to Rev. James Endicott

Monday, December 18, 1967
CANADA

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Rev. Endicott's telegram inviting him to speak at a rally in Toronto. He regretfully declines the invitation due to the volume of work with his organization.

Letter from Helen F. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
New York (NY)

Helen Gallagher is addressing the national issues in the United States as it relates to the war. She suggests to Dr. King a personal tax that could possibly go toward initiatives that Americans feel are important. Gallagher feels that this is a way to for Americans to represent themselves when they are unsatisfied with their congressional representatives.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Wednesday, May 12, 1965
New York (NY), PUERTO RICO

The Program Committee of the World Convention of Churches of Christ requests Dr. King for the delivery of a major address at the Seventh Assembly in Puerto Rico. Laurence V. Kirkpatrick, the acting general secretary and friend of Reverend Andrew Young, contacts Dr. King to inquire about the status of the original invitation because the organization has yet to receive a response.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

Saturday, May 1, 1965
New York (NY), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA)

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

Letter from Martin Gal to MLK

Thursday, August 8, 1963
Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Martin Gal, Producer in Public Affairs at WMSB TV, requests permission rights to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for broadcasting purposes. Gal seeks to create a short pictorial documentary with Dr. King reading the text as a voice-over.

Report of Director of Mission Development

Chicago, IL, New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Indiana (IN)

Rev. Dr. Archie Hargraves was a distinguished urban minister and church leader who served America's cities for more than half a century. In this report he gives a summary of individual organizations under Mission Development, of which he was the Director. All of these organizations aimed to augment employment and economic opportunities for their respective surrounding communities.

Invoice for The 1961 American Peoples Encyclopedia Yearbook

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This invoice was sent to Dr.King is from the 1961 American Peoples Encyclopedia, which gives an account of the events during the year 1960.

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

Wednesday, July 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.

Letter from Margo Belden to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Montana (MT)

Margo Belden inquires about materials from Dr. King for Choice '68, the national collegiate presidential primary.

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Alabama (AL), New York, NY

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

MLK Remarks at the NAACP's Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1960
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King addresses the NAACP in regards to the equality of the school systems for Negro students. He urges the crowd to "employ only the highest weapons of dignity and discipline" while continuing to fight against segregation.

Letter from W. Ivan Hoy to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963
Florida (FL)

W. Ivan Hoy, on behalf of the University of Miami, invites Dr. King to be a guest lecturer for their Miami Religion Lecture Series.

Letter From Intergroup Relations Agencies to Ivan Allen

Friday, September 9, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The senders of this letter request a meeting with Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen to discuss inadequate housing, overcrowded schools, under-employment and "minimal enforcement of the city's building code." The senders represent a variety of organizations and offer their expertise in developing solutions to the problems facing Atlanta.

Letter from Robert K. Hudnut to MLK about a Monument

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

In this letter Robert K. Hudnut of the St. Luke Presbyterian Church offers an idea to Dr. King, namely to build a monument for those that have given their life in the line of civil rights. Hudnut proposes to call the monument "A Martyrs' Monument."

Letter from MLK to Mimi A. Edwards

Tuesday, December 4, 1962
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King responds to the letter of Mimi Edwards, as student at Elizabeth City Teachers College in North Carolina. He stresses the impact that a nonviolent movement can have on the South, the nation, and the world. He also enclosed copies of two articles to assist Miss Edwards with a paper she is writing.

The Boston Sunday Globe: The Road to Loyalty

Sunday, August 28, 1966
Boston, MA

Justice Felix Frankfurter is quoted by the Boston Sunday Globe to discuss the lack of liberty in history due to repulsive individuals. The American Civil Liberties Union is accused of being communist as well as Jefferey Gordon, a member of the pro-Peking Progressive Labor Party. The article expounds on various organizations and quotes surrounding their political perspective.

MLK Schedule for November, 1960

Rhode Island (RI), New York (NY), GHANA, NIGERIA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., London, England

This schedule lists Dr. King's travel itinerary and speaking engagements for November, 1960.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, June 3, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter dated June 3, 1964, Joan Daves sends Dr. King two copies of his contract for for his book entitled "Why We Can't Wait". The terms for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait" have already been cleared.

A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), FRANCE, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, Michigan (MI), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Washington, D.C., NETHERLANDS, UNITED KINGDOM, CANADA, SWITZERLAND, INDIA, Cleveland, OH

This pamphlet is from Dr. King's undergraduate alma mater, Morehouse College. The President of the institute, Benjamin E. Mays, is the author of , "A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse" which outlines the progress made during his presidency.

Letter from Mrs. Behlen to Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Mrs. Behlen congratulates Ralph Abernathy for the wonderful job he did during the funeral services for Dr. King.

Public Statement at the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Wednesday, July 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King speaks at a rally held for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Dr. King stresses the importance of government assistance in protecting African Americans citizens from violent actions when registering and voting during elections. In areas such as Mississippi where harassment and murders took place frequently, African Americans were in dire need of a political party that was free of racism so that they could fairly be represented in a prejudice society.