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"DOMINICAN REPUBLIC"

God

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosophy, God, and the world. King quotes Dr. Shirley Guthrie, "It is the Lord; let him do what seemeth Him good."

Letter from John Moorman to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967

John Moorman, President of the Student Christian Association at Guilford College, invites Dr. King to be the speaker for their Religious Emphasis Week in April of 1968. Moorman discusses details of the arrangement, including Dr. King's honorarium and travel expenses.

Letter from Rosetta Ritz to MLK

Sunday, March 13, 1966

Rosetta Ritz expresses admiration and gratitude to Dr. King for his selfless efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Ms. Ritz hopes Dr. King will find time to visit with "economically deprived" children in the Chicago area.

Telegram from MLK to Governor Albertis Harrison

Dr. King requests an investigation into acts of police brutality committed in Petersburg, Virginia during a demonstration.

Telegram from Mr. Robert Lieberman to MLK about Denver Teachers Union

In this telegram, Mr. Lieberman writes to Dr. King requesting his support for an upcoming unionization vote by Denver public school teachers.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Saturday, December 9, 1961

An "English Quaker" thanks Dr. King for his letter and references an impending donation. The contributor informs Dr. King that she intends on communicating with her bank to find out if she can transfer the whole sum and promises to have definite news soon.

Nobel Peace Prize Dinner Program

Monday, January 27, 1964

The citizens of Atlanta held a recognition dinner on January 27, 1965 to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize. Tributes were offered by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., AME Bishop Ernest Hickman, Rev. Edward Driscoll of the Georgia Council of Churches, State Senator Leroy Johnson, and Roman Catholic Archbishop Paul Hallinan. Dr. King gave the address.

Letter from Gitta Gossman to Dora McDonald

Friday, February 26, 1965

Gitta Gossman forwards Ms. McDonald two copies of the contract for the Dutch-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King's signature.

MLK Memorial Service Program in Seattle, Washington

Sunday, April 7, 1968

Three days after the death of Dr. King this memorial service, conducted by Reverend Theodore Kennedy, took place at the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Seattle.

Social Ethics

Dr. King records a quote from Psalms 41:1 and connects the passage to social ethics.

Letter from Tommie Crockett to MLK

Tommie Crockett expresses his appreciation for the work of Dr. King. He explains that black people are getting tired of the nonviolence method and are beginning to embrace the term, "Black Power." He explains that blacks will no longer participate in peaceful civil rights demonstrations because, "we already done that."

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Members List

This document lists members of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, Commission on National Programs and Policies as of December 1965.

His Attitude Toward Higher Criticism

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Immanuel Kant's book "The Preface to the First Edition.

Negotiation Now!

Negotiation Now is a national citizens' campaign that supports new initiatives to end the Vietnam War. The campaign aligns with the Secretary General of the United Nations, U Thant, who discusses the necessary "cessation" of bombing in North Vietnam to bring about a peaceful political compromise. This flier shares the campaign's views and offers a section for donation information.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Letter from Ellen Silver to MLK

Mrs. Silver writes to Dr. King to inform him that his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" will be edited for the publication of the textbook "The Triple Revolution: Social Problems in Depth."

Letter from Cass Canfield to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Cass Canfield from Harper & Row, Publishers thanks Joan Daves for sending the outline of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here." Cass suggests that in the book Dr. King "should stress that the Negro problem is part of the poverty problem."

Letter from David Diamond to MLK

Tuesday, May 31, 1966

David Diamond, author of the book "A Bucket of Whitewash" inquires about Dr. King providing commentary for his upcoming release. As a result, Diamond is set to share royalties from his book sales with the SCLC.

Proposal: Pilgrimage to Rome

The Pilgrimage to Rome proposal addresses peace issues for an audience with Pope John. The proposal elaborates on the different aspects of the pilgrimage including political approaches, the involvement of women, arrangements, meetings and more. The proposal also entails excerpts from the first responses to the pilgrimage.

Letter from Adlai E. Stevenson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

US Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai Stevenson, informs Dr. King that they will have to postpone their meeting due to a U.N. Security Council meeting that Mr. Stevenson has to preside over.

Letter from MLK to Michael J. Quill

Thursday, August 24, 1961

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Michael J. Quill's dedication to the "front lines" during a libel case. Dr. King informs Mr. Quill of the current status of the case and the courts response. He further provides Mr. Quill with the operations in the south and their deep involvement in the "Freedom Ride."

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

Thursday, June 27, 1963

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.

Letter from Dr. Herman Klugman

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Dr. Herman Klugman, Dr. King's German-language tutor at Boston University, offers his congratulations on the coveted Nobel Peace Prize. He states that, as a Jew whose people experienced Nazi persecution, he has watched the "Gleichberechtigung" (equal rights) struggle with deep emotion.

Note Card on Hugo of St. Victor

This note card concerns Hugo of St. Victor's dealings with theology and mysticism.

Interview about Refusal to Seat Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

This is transcript of a question and answer period following a news conference at which Dr. King made a statement regarding the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Julian Bond after Bond announced his support of a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) news release opposing the Vietnam War. King led a protest rally to the state house.

Telegram from MLK to Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King expresses his gratification to Senator Edward M. Kennedy for sponsoring the amendment to abolish the poll tax in state elections.

Royalty Statement from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Harper and Row

Monday, April 10, 1967

J. Campe informs Dr. King of the deductions for his royalty check from Harper and Row.

Letter from Christopher Pearce to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967

Mr. Pearce, a young English filmmaker, desiring to produce a documentary on Dr. King, requests permission to follow him about Washington, D. C. during his upcoming visit.

Man (Sin)

Dr. King writes about Jeremiah's loss of confidence in man, reflecting on the biblical passage Jeremiah 9: 4-6.

The Negro Heritage Library

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.