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Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963

Mrs. Joan Daves references an enclosure of two copies of the Swedish-language edition of "Strength to Love," along with an advanced payment for the return of a signed copy.

Letter from Negro Non-Commissioned Officers to Civil Rights Leaders

Saturday, January 7, 1967

The non-commissioned officers of Fort Polk write major civil rights organizations and publications to share their story of segregation and discrimination in the town of Leesville. The authors hope that their letter will be published - exposing the injustices.

Letter from Marc Steel to Rev. R.D. Abernathy about a Term Paper

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Marc Steel, a high school sophomore from Maryland, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy, requesting information on his role in the Civil Rights Movement. This student sought to acquire a narrative of Rev. Abernathy and his goals for SCLC, in order to complete a term paper.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

SCLC's Eighth Annual Convention Resolution

Friday, October 2, 1964

This SCLC Resolution for the 8th Annual Convention, outlines the plan to encourage churchmen across the country to vote in the light of religious faith and conviction.

Letter from Dan H. Elkind to MLK

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

Mr. Elkind discusses recent actions of the SNCC and the SCLC's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign. He believes that the actions made by the SNCC will lead to violence and also "alienate" supporters of civil rights legislation. He views Dr. King's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign to be unlawful, and therefore suggests a different approach for Dr. King to take.

H. Rap Brown Requests SNCC Support

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's New York office of International Affairs, requests support during the August 27, 1967 boycott of General Motors. After declaring itself a Human Rights organization, SNCC requests support in the worldwide struggle for human rights, especially black liberation schools in the United States.

SCLC Board Meeting

Tuesday, September 29, 1964

This is the agenda for a board meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Savannah, Georgia.

Letter from W. A. F. Braem to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mr. Braem writes Dr. King emphasizing the importance of self-reliance. Braem list some issues that Civil Rights leaders should pay attention to such as education.

Letter from Roland de Corneille to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

Rev. Roland de Corneille informs Dr. King that he has been invited by the International Teach-In Committee at the University of Toronto to participate in a program featuring representatives from Vietnam.

SCLC Benefit Appeal

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Dr. King personally requests the support of forty organizations for SCLC's "Stars for Freedom" benefit. The appeal states that featured artists at the event include Harry Belafonte, Aretha Franklin, and Sidney Portier, and Dr. King will also be speaking at the event.

Vietnamese Student's Appeal for Peace

This document reveals that a Vietnamese student burned herself as an appeal for peace. The document also states that some of the writings that she left behind have been translated.

Letter from John Dempsey to S. Ernest Vandiver

Monday, July 30, 1962

Connecticut governor John Dempsey writes to Georgia governor S. Earnest Vandiver expressing his concern for the safety of Dr. King and his associates.

God's Relation to the World

Dr. King outlines the sermon "God's Relation to the World." Dr. King breaks down the sermon into three themes: God's creation of the world, His conservation of the world, and His transformation of the world.

Telegram from Morris Abram to MLK

Morris B. Abram expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and shares his outrage towards the police brutality exhibited during a protest in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Dr. MLK to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church about a Contribution

Friday, February 9, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church in Stuanton, Virginia while explaining how such contributions help the SCLC and civil rights.

Letter from Michael George to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1968

Mr. George expresses his views on Dr. King's response to the riots Dr. King assisted in ending.

Letter from Rosa A. King to MLK

Rosa King invites Dr. King to be a speaker at Central Baptist Church's 14th Annual Friends Day in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

MLK Addresses the National Association of the Bar

Wednesday, April 21, 1965

Dr. King seeks to gain support from legal practitioners by comparing the fight for legal rights of African Americans to the earlier fight for independence in which America took a stand against the forces of England.

Letter from Congressman James G. O'Hara to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Congressman James G. O'Hara, US Representative from Michigan, informs Dr. King that he has signed the home rule discharge petition for the District of Columbia.

Letter from MLK to the Bulstrode School Children

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dr. King thanks the school children of Bulstrode in England for their SCLC contribution by means of their daffodil sales. Outlining the current work of the SCLC, he educates the young supporters on the measures being taken to secure voting rights via "Operation Breadbasket" and "Operation Dialogue."

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Letter from Norman Thomas to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Norman Thomas offers his congratulations to Dr. King for being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Thomas also feels the need to thank the Nobel Committee for recognizing Dr. King's leadership in being the one to receive the coveted award.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

These sermon notes outline the inevitable fall of evil. Dr. King uses the work of influential American historian, Charles A. Beard to prove this claim. "A graphic example of this truth" is found in ancient proverbs that Dr. King aims to examine in detail.

Letter from Sympathizer to MLK

Writing under a pseudonym, the author suggests that the world is separate because that is the way that God intended it to be. The author pulls text from the Bible to support this idea. The author believes that society was equal with the separation and there is no need for Dr. King to continue his fight.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

Letter from US Citizen to MLK

"A citizen who loves the country God let him own," writes to Dr. and Mrs. King criticizing them on their views on Vietnam and their ministerial work in regards to Christianity.

Letter from The American Foundation On Nonviolence to David Hunter

Thursday, January 18, 1968

The American Foundation On Nonviolence makes an inquiry to the distribution of grant funds from David Hunter.

MKL At Zoin Hill - "The Ballot"

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This transcript of a passionate, poetic, and inspiring speech touches on many of King's motifs. It starts with an appeal for voting rights, addresses the despair the audience feels from time to time, and ends with a refrain of "we shall overcome."

Letter to MLK from Raymond Brown

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Raymond Brown writes to Dr. King admonishing him for his affiliations with Adam Clayton Powell and Stokely Carmichael and hopes that these associations are temporary.