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God (His Existence)

Change title to conform to Dr. King’s filing system.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

The Wind of Change is Blowing

Wednesday, June 27, 1962
South Africa, CANADA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), London, England, GHANA, South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), LIBERIA, ETHIOPIA

Dr. King addresses the positive changes that have taken place across the world and how they should continue to occur until equality is reached.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Chicago, IL, Boston, MA

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Wednesday, October 18, 1967
Missouri (MO), Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Milwaukee, WI, VIETNAM, Dallas, TX

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

MLK's Statement on Endorsing a 1960 Presidential Candidate

Tuesday, November 1, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King states that the SCLC is a non-partisan organization and that he cannot endorse a political party or candidate. He then goes on to express gratitude for Senator Kennedy and Mayor Hartsfield for their continuous support and leadership.

Freud

Dr. King draws an analogy between Columbus and Dr. Sigmund Freud in that each discovered a "continent."

Letter from Lawrence Friedman to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
California (CA)

The former president of the Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation, Lawrence J. Friedman, writes Dr. King to inform him of a letter concerning the Kennedy assassination, which was written on an unauthorized piece of stationery. The letter is dated January 29, 1968, but The Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation was dissovled under the laws of the State of California on May 16, 1966. The letter was signed by Donald Freed. Lawrence P. Friedman wishes to make it clear that he had no knowledge of the letter being sent.

Letter from Marvin T. Robinson to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967
California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Reverend Marvin T. Robinson, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, requests that Dr. King submit a written statement on personal stationary for the Souvenir Journal, a Seventy-Fifth Anniversary release issued by the Friendship Baptist Church.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Friday, February 11, 1966
CANADA

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson that he cannot accept his invitation to Toronto due to his prior commitments for the month of June.

Making the Best of A Bad Mess

Sunday, April 24, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This text of Dr. King's "Making the Best of a Bad Mess" sermon encourages the congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church to remain faithful in times of destitution. He makes clear the point that happiness is not found, but is instead created.

Letter from Ethel Harvey to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Ethel Harvey writes to Dr. King regarding her desire to support the Civil Rights Movement. She then expresses her ideas towards resolving tension between whites and black relations.

Waste in Foreign Aid

Sunday, February 19, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), BRAZIL, Washington, D.C.

Irene M. Kashmer suggests Dr. King address the issue of wasted foreign aid in his march on Washington. She encloses a New York Times article from February 15, 1967 to emphasize her point.

Christianity

Dr. King references Emil Brunner's argument on Christianity.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

JAPAN, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Tour Itinerary to Stockholm, Sweden in Connection with 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Awards

Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, DENMARK, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, New York (NY), New York, NY, FRANCE, London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

This document contains a tour itinerary for Dr. King's visit to Oslo, Norway from Henderson Travel Service.

Terminated Employee Asks for a Meeting with the SCLC Board

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Meredith Gilbert writes to William Rutherford regarding her termination in January 1968 from employment with SCLC.

Letter from Tom Edward Ross to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL

Tom Edward Ross informs Dr. King of a piece of artwork he created of Dr. King. An effort to publish the piece in the Houston Chronicle was unsuccessful. Ross seeks Dr. King's assistance in promoting the sale of the piece.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Agenda

Friday, August 16, 1963
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

This document is a strategic outline for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Thank you letter to MLK from Major

Tennessee (TN)

Major thanks Dr. King for a good meeting and some great plans. He apologizes for his tardiness due to a delay in Washington.

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Corbett

Tuesday, January 25, 1966
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King thanks Miss Corbett for her message regarding the SCLC Chicago Campaign. He agrees with Miss Corbett's view that the current Negro dilemma is rooted in multiple causes. He also discusses standards of living, economic conditions and society as a whole.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK Regarding Union Merger

Monday, November 21, 1966
Denver, CO, Arizona (AZ)

Mr. Howard, Vice President of International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of negotiations for the merger of his organization's union and the United Steelworkers of America. If successful, this merger would strengthen the civil rights and labor movements in the South.

Black Power and Liberation: A Communist View

New York (NY), New York, NY

Arnold Johnson, Public Relations Director of Communist Party U. S. A, requests commentary on Claude Lightfoot's pamphlet "A Note on Black Power and Liberation." The pamphlet has sparked discussions in the public press and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Letter from Neil V. Sullivan to Dr. Green about New Publication

Thursday, March 30, 1967
Berkeley, CA, Michigan (MI), California (CA)

In this letter Neil Sullivan expresses his desire to coordinate with Dr. Daniel K. Freudenthal in the creation of a book on the education of the urban poor.

Letter from George Field to Ms. McDonald

Tuesday, November 12, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Fields requests advance text of remarks Dr. King is to give at the Twenty-second Freedom House Anniversary Dinner. The Freedom House Dinner receives major attention from the media and boasts a guest list of influential opinion makers.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN)

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Tennessee (TN)

Postcard has a photo entitled "Training Schools for Communists". American Opinion claims the photo was taken at the Highlander Folk School over Labor Day weekend 1957. Dr. King is depicted as one the attendees. Postcard was stamped with an Abraham Lincoln postage stamp (One of the guiding forces to Dr. King and his efforts)

Letter to Margaret C. Fowler from MLK about Governor Nelson Rockefeller

Thursday, September 9, 1965
New York (NY)

In this letter to New York Calendar Secretary Margaret Fowler, Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Governor Rockefeller's willingness to speak at Ebenezer Baptist Church's Annual Men's Day Observance. Dr. King then describes the schedule of events for Rockefeller's visit.

The World of the Patriarchs

EGYPT, SYRIA, GREECE

Dr. King records historical and geographical data regarding several countries, such as Egypt, Greece, and Palestine. King places a special emphasis on the "World of the Patriarch," the title of this document, and writes notes on the "age of the Patriarch," which takes place after 2000 B. C.