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Letter from Nancy Atkinson of Time Magazine to MLK

Wednesday, April 29, 1964

Nancy Atkinson sends Dr. King a duplicate of the Time Magazine cover honoring him as the Man of the Year for 1963. He is informed that the cover will be a part of a traveling exhibit of other Time covers.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology" on the concept of freedom.

The False God of Money

Sunday, July 19, 1953

This sermon titled "The False God of Money" was preached by Dr. King on July 19, 1953. Dr. King raised a question to his congregation stating, "Will you serve the transitory god of money which is here today and gone tomorrow or will you serve the eternal God of the universe who is the same yesterday, today and forever?"

Letter from MLK to Rev. John Papandrew

Wednesday, October 10, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. John Papandrew of New Hampshire for giving witness during the Albany Movement. Dr. King explains that, through the events in Albany, the world is now aware of the situation in the South.

Letter from Claudie Erleigh to MLK

Wednesday, October 5, 1966

On behalf of the NUSAS Local Committee, Claudie Erleigh writes Dr. King requesting that he submit an article for the "NUSAS Journal." Dr. King's entry would extend further beyond the "general interest." The committee has also invited other influential leaders, such as Senator Robert F. Kennedy, to contribute to this journal.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bob Alpert

Thursday, March 21, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Bob Alpert of the Hotel and Club Employees Union to thank him for his previous correspondence. Miss McDonald informs Mr. Alpert that she cannot fulfill his request to receive additional copies of Dr. King's article that was published in the "Nation." However, she recommends that Alpert communicate with Carey McWilliams, editor of the "Nation," to receive those copies.

Letter from Ernesto R. Rodriguez, Jr. to MLK

Friday, September 2, 1966

Ernesto Rodriguez invites Dr. King to address the College Editors Guild Alumni Association at their 35th Anniversary Celebration.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addressed multiple issues that they had a misunderstanding about. He then tells Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions. Lastly, he informs Attorney General Cook that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Michael J.. Gerstley

Friday, March 29, 1963

Miss McDonald sends Michael Gerstley an autographed card per Dr. King's instructions.

Letter from High School Student Jeanne Adams to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Joanne Adams, a student from Central High School, writes Dr. King to voice her support for what he is doing for negro citizens in Birmingham, Alabama.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, October 31, 1966

The SCEF Executive Board asserts that the attack of black power is injuring the plight of democracy in the United States. The SCEF board declared "the idea of black power has a long and honorable history but it is currently being misrepresented in the news media in the United States."

SCLC North Carolina Field Report

Golden Frinks, a SCLC field secretary who represented the New Bern, North Carolina chapter, releases a field report. This report discusses the SCLC Action Program in North Carolina, and includes a monthly overview of the SCLC's contributions.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Francis Robinson

Wednesday, May 25, 1966

Mrs. King expresses her appreciation for the opera tickets that Mr. Robinson gave to her and Dr. King.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Public Meeting

Monday, August 10, 1964

Dr. King is listed as the keynote speaker for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Forty-First Boule on August 10, 1964.

People in Action: Unknown Heroes

Thursday, May 10, 1962

This New York Amsterdam News article by Dr. King introduces two unknown heroes of the Civil Rights Movement in the South, Esau Jenkins and Billy Fleming. Jenkins taught the riders on his buses how to read and write so they could qualify to vote. This idea was the basis for SCLC's Citizenship School program. Fleming, an undertaker in Clarendon County, South Carolina, was a leader in the Briggs v. Elliott school desegregation lawsuit, the earliest of five suits to be combined in the US Supreme Court?s landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.

Permission Form from Friendship House to MLK for Signature

Sunday, December 11, 1966

This document, from James G. Duignan of Friendship House, is sent to Dr. King for his signature, granting permission to reproduce, distribute and or sell recorded copies of two speeches.

Memorandum from Opal C. Jones to MLK Regarding

Friday, April 7, 1967

In this letter, Opal Jones informs Dr. King of an address change for the Neighborhood Adult Participation Project.

Revised Grant Award Letter from Otis Roberts

Otis Roberts lists changes to a grant awarded by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

Philosophy of History

Dr. King writes about the philosophy of history according to Isaiah 41: 1-7.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Aiken Regarding Housing

Dr. King urges Senator George Aiken and other members of the Republican Party to support an open housing bill to promote better living conditions in Negro communities.

Seventh Biennial Religious Conference

This is a program for the seventh Biennial Religious Conference at Princeton University. Initially conceived shortly after World War II, the conference continues to confront important issues of human life. Under the leadership of the Student Christian Association, "Integration: Conscience in Crisis" will take place over a span of four days. Topics of the conference include "the historical and social as well as the judicial, international, and theological" implications of segregation and integration.

Coretta's Personal Story

This telegram, dictated to Charles L. Sanders on the way back from the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremony, contains Mrs. Coretta Scott King's sentimental narrative of her acclaimed relationship with Dr. King. Revealing details that range from their meeting in 1951 through twelve years of marriage, Mrs. King admits she was immediately smitten by Dr.

Post Card Front from Alice and Jun Hayakawa to Coretta King

The Hayakawa family send this photo greeting to Mrs. King, addressing her as "Corrie." The family expresses their concern for Mrs. King and hopes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King following a recent accident.

Letter from Max Hess to MLK

Monday, May 14, 1962

Mr. Hess expresses his sincere admiration for Dr. King stating, "you have done more than stood fast in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free."

Society

Dr. King quotes a statement from Charles H. Cooley's "The Social Process," in which Cooley defines society as a living, unified group of processes.

Telegram from Morris Abram to MLK

Morris B. Abram expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and shares his outrage towards the police brutality exhibited during a protest in Selma, Alabama.