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Telegram from MLK regarding OEO

Monday, October 30, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King sent this telegram to several members of the House of Representatives urging them to approve a vote on the Office of Economic Opportunity and the War on Poverty.

Philosophical Work

Dr. King outlines significant philosophical and theological publications from the eleventh to the nineteenth century. Thinkers whose work is referenced include: St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke.

Religious Leadership

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Carlisle's Variety Shop Souvenir Booklet

Birmingham, AL

Carlisle Variety Shop produced this souvenir booklet advertising Negro businesses but also honoring Dr. King and other SCLC officials involved in the 1963 Birmingham campaign.

Telegram from Richard Beyer to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965
Washington (WA), CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Richard Beyer telegrams Dr. King inquiring if he is available to speak at a peace rally in Washington sponsored by Canadian and Northwest Peace groups.

Letter from MLK to S. Dillon Ripley at the Smithsonian Institute

Friday, May 21, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, that he is unable to attend the bicentennial celebration of the birth of James Smithson.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey Preston

Friday, June 12, 1964
Chicago, IL, St. Augustine, FL, Baltimore, MD

Ms. McDonald informs Mrs. Preston that two of Dr. King's friends have encouraged him to reconsider accepting an invitation to speak at her sorority's convention. Hopefully, rearrangement of Dr. King's schedule will permit his acceptance.

Notes for U.F.T. Address

On March 14, 1964, Dr. King was presented with the John Dewey Award by the United Teachers Federation. The address he delivered that day is outlined in this type-written draft along with his handwritten notes. In the draft, Dr. King emphasizes the importance of education, especially as a tool for African American advancement. He cites how the deprivation of education has been used as a way to systematically oppress African Americans and he asserts that this inequality is a reality that must be confronted. Dr.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Article Fee

Thursday, November 19, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Ms. Daves encloses Dr. King's fee for his article in the "Saturday Evening Post" and discusses issues concerning future reprints of this particular work.

Response from MLK to Paul Yeiter

Monday, January 8, 1968
Oregon (OR), SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to Yeiter's questioning of his support of plans to boycott the 1968 Olympic games. Dr. King argues that Negro athletes have presented specific and reasonable demands to the Olympic Committee, which reflects a valid concern for the social welfare and progress of the whole nation. He commends these athletes for their determination and courageous stand against racism and injustice.

"The American Dream"

Tuesday, June 6, 1961
New York (NY), Washington (WA), INDIA, Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), SPAIN, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA

This transcription of the commencement address delivered by Dr. King at Lincoln University on June 6 1961.

Telegram from Alfred Duckett to Mrs. King

Friday, October 30, 1964
New York, NY

Alfred Duckett asks Mrs. King to airmail her "program breakdown" to meet a printing deadline.

Letter from Lanette J. Campbell

Saturday, March 16, 1968
New York (NY)

Lanette J. Campbell requests information regarding candidates in the Choice '68 presidential primary.

Letter from Robert L. Tucker Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967
New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Robert Tucker inquires about Dr. King's views on Adam Clayton Powell and his position in Washington. Tucker states that he has great respect for Dr. King, which is why he wants clarity on his sentiments regarding the Powell controversy.

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

Boston, MA, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA)

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

SCLC Mail Log: March 4, 1968

Monday, March 4, 1968

This mail log lists the names of people and organizations sending correspondences to several SCLC staff members.

Letter from Mrs. Nat Cole to Donald Frey

Thursday, May 6, 1965
Illinois (IL)

This letter was sent from Mrs. Nat (Mona) Cole to Mr. Donald S. Frey. In this letter Mrs. Cole thanks Mr. Frey for forwarding the Open Occupancy Award Certificate to her, honoring her late husband Nat King Cole.

Letter from Shirley Bird to Miss Sander

Monday, February 19, 1962
Texas (TX)

Ms. Bird discusses Dr. King's lecture appearance at the University of Texas. Dr. King's lecture was entitled "Civil Liberties and Social Action."

Letter from MLK to J. Frank Patch

Friday, May 13, 1966
CANADA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King declines to accept J. Frank Patch's invitation to attend the conference sponsored by the Baptist Union of Western Canada due to prior commitments in the United States.

Letter of Support to MLK While In Jail

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Connecticut (CT), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Silas Townsend wrote this letter to Dr. King upon his jailing in Birmingham in 1967. Townsend writes how appropriate it is that Dr. King is jailed on All Saints Day.

Note on MLK Recorded Statement

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Virgina Kassel sends a transcript of a recorded statement by Dr. King. Ms. Kassel provides Dora McDonald of the details related to statement and apologies for any errors on the transcript document.

Letter from Saskatchewan Centennial Corporation to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967
CANADA, Alabama (AL)

Pat Ettinger asks Dr. King to send a personal gift for an auction to raise money for Canada's centennial celebration.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Tallahassee, FL, North Carolina (NC), Pittsburgh, PA, Illinois (IL), Los Angeles, CA, Philadelphia, PA, Texas (TX), Columbus, OH, Michigan (MI)

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.

Letter from David Segal to MLK

New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

David Segal writes Dr. King enclosing books his wife purchased from the School of Library Services at Columbia University.

Dignitaries Attending the Spring Moblization

Presented here is a list of political and social leaders attending a mobilization held in the spring.

Telegram from Joseph Lowery to Wyatt Walker

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL

Reverend Joseph E. Lowery writes to Reverend Wyatt Walker acknowledging his support of Walker's "sacrifice in behalf of freedom and justice for all."

Letter from MLK to Senator Daniel Brewster

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King commends Senator Daniel Brewster for his support of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

Letter from Rev. J. Edward Lantz to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Rev. Lantz, Executive Director of the Southern Office of the National Council of the Churches of Christ, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter From Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Publication Date of the German Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, May 22, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the desire of the German publishers to have a publication date. Joan Daves also inquires if Dr. King has free time for Mayor Brandt.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956
San Francisco, CA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.