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Letter from Charles E. Blackburn to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

Charles Blackburn shares with Dr. King a mutual passion for change. Blackburn expresses that his concern is not with the "American Negroe's revolt against hypocrisy," but with the hypocrisy as it applies to the young white generation.

Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood, Inc. Program

Friday, June 4, 1965

The Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood organized this program where Dr. King makes a special address.

Joint Memorandum of Intern Regarding the Death of James Reeb

Tuesday, June 1, 1965

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the Unitarian Universalist Association, and the American Friends Service Committee have each established a James Reeb Memorial Fund. The purpose of these funds are to provide financial assistance to those who are personally involved in the struggle for equal rights. James Reeb was a white civil rights activist who was brutally murdered by white segregationists in Selma, 1965.

Letter from Alfred Gallen to MLK

A Chicago native writes to Dr. King concerning his current social and political affairs. He suggests that Dr. King should redirect his efforts to empower the black community rather than utilizing government assistance. He asserts that his presence and activities have ignited negative race relations.

Telegram from MLK to Nicholas Biddle

Friday, March 16, 1962

Dr. King apologizes to Nicholas Biddle for being unable to attend the testimonial for Senator Jacob Javits.

Telegram from Thompson Bradley and Others to MLK

Sunday, February 12, 1967

The Pennsylvania Universities Council on Problems of War and Peace express their support to Dr. King.

Letter from J. M. Lawson Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Minister J. M. Lawson Jr. served as director of nonviolent education for SCLC from 1960 to 1967. In this letter to Dr. King he expresses concerns about program efforts for the summer and fall seasons. Mr. Lawson is conscious of the necessary redirection of the project and informs Dr. King that he has recommendations.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Monday, January 8, 1968

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.

Letter from the Georgia Voter's League

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Hosea Williams and P. B. McCoy, co-chairmen of the Georgia Voter's League, inform members of the organization that Dr. King will be addressing their 1968 annual convention.

Letter from Victor Carter to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Victor Carter writes a letter of support to Dr. King on behalf of he and his wife. The Carters are unable to attend the Selma to Montgomery march but enclose a check to aid in the civil right struggle.

Eulogy for Robert W. Spike

Dr. King highlights the life and work of American clergyman, theologian, and civil rights leader, Robert W. Spike. Spike was a leader known for mobilizing church participation for the Civil Rights Movement. Less than one year after accepting a professorship at the University of Chicago, he was murdered.

MLK's Reply to an Invitation

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King regrets to inform Robin Skuce of his inability to accept her invitation to speak at a seminar for a Canadian high school under the auspice of the United Nations Association in Canada. Dr. King informs Miss Skuce that he must decline her offer due to preparation of several SCLC programs scheduled for the following year.

Letter from Morehouse College President to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966

Morehouse College President Dr. Benjamin E. Mays appeals to Dr. King to contribute to the school on the occasion of the college?s 100th anniversary.

Letter from Aileen B. Armstrong to MLK

Saturday, May 18, 1963

Mrs. Armstrong writes Dr. King to express her regard and deep appreciation for his work.

Letter from the Weyburn Chamber of Commerce to MLK

Saturday, March 20, 1965

The Weyburn Chamber of Commerce, a Canadian organization, is partaking in the various events surrounding the 60th founding anniversary of the Province of Saskatchewan. The chamber commends Dr. King as a Nobel Peace Prize winner and aspires to have him visit to discuss the racial issues in America.

Letter From S. I. Hayakawa to MLK

Friday, July 26, 1963

S.I. Hayakawa inquires about a previous contribution to the SCLC and asks if it is tax deductible.

SCLC Memo- The Ministers Leadership Training Program

Thursday, February 15, 1968

This memo reminds the Steering Committee and Executive Staff, of the SCLC, that "funds for the Ministers Leadership Training Program are not being used to finance currect SCLC direct-action programs."

Observer: The Fiery Savior

Journalist Ponchitta Pierce sends Dr. King an article that details the press conference of "The Militant." In response to questioning, the individual expresses their discontent with liberal politics, the United States of America, and its presence in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

Ravenswood Post: "New Book by Dr. King Is Published"

Wednesday, June 21, 1967

This document is an article on the subject of Dr. King's new book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article sketches an overview of the book and makes synopses of various chapters.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Evil

Dr. King references the religious philosopher William Ernest Hocking regarding the topic of evil.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Universalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines some fundamental principles of "Universalism".

Letter from Benjamin Mays to Editors of the New York Times

Monday, August 20, 1962

In this letter, Mays addresses the editors of the New York Times about an article on equal employment opportunity. Mays states that he was not consulted by the article's author. As a result, he was misquoted. Mays uses the remainder of the article to clarify his position on equal employment programs.

Congratulations To Rev. Martin Luther King And Mrs. King

Thursday, February 24, 1966

An anonymous supporter sends encouraging words to Dr. and Mrs. King.

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

Monday, August 29, 1966

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

Moral and Religious Imperatives for Brotherhood

Saturday, February 9, 1963

Dr. King shares how important it is for America to obtain racial integration.

Letter from Bob Bodie to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Bob Bodie, Choice '68 Chairman at John Brown University, asks Dr. King to send materials about himself for the National Collegiate Presidential Primary. Bodie requests posters, buttons and literature to acquaint the students with Dr. King.

MLK on Danville and the Problem of Violence

Friday, July 12, 1963

Dr. King discusses his perception of the nonviolent movement, and how the leadership maintains control even though minimal violent outbreaks may occur.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. V. E. Moray

Friday, April 14, 1967

Joan Daves gives Dr. Moray permission to publish a Marathi edition of "Why We Can't Wait."