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Statement from Grace H. Giles

Grace H. Giles writes Reverend Ralph Abernathy and requests that he share a vision with her. She also includes several meaningful words and acronyms that she created.

Colwell, Ernest Cadman

Dr. King references Ernest Caldwell's book "Toward Better Theological Education."

Letter from Congressman James G. O'Hara to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Congressman James G. O'Hara, US Representative from Michigan, informs Dr. King that he has signed the home rule discharge petition for the District of Columbia.

Dr. Paul Arthur Scilpp Speech in Illinois

In this address delivered before the National Assembly for Progress in Equality of Opportunity in Housing, Dr. Paul Arthur Schilpp speaks about equality between races, "pure" race, and voting rights for Negroes.

SCLC Newsletter

Sunday, August 27, 1967

This SCLC Newsletter discusses topics such as anti-Semitism, progress in various parts of the country, and Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Swedish Student Katarina Andersson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Katarina Andersson, a young Swedish girl, thanks Dr. King for the inspiration his book "Why We Can't Wait" has provided her. She expresses her keen interest in the American civil rights movement and her hope to study in the United States in the future.

Letter from Catherine Aller to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Catherine Aller took the time to write Dr. King and encourage him to keep pursuing his goals in spite of criticism.

Letter from Grandison Cherry-El to MLK

Thursday, October 21, 1965

Grandison Cherry-El, Minister with The Moorish Science Temple of America, contacts US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbak in reference to discrimination in citizenship in American public schools.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Annual Report by MLK

Friday, October 2, 1964

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Mr. Jones, on behalf of the Council for Co-operative Action, invites Dr. King to speak at their function in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Letter from Jerome Karlin to MLK

Wednesday, November 28, 1962

Jerome B. Karlin expresses his admiration for Dr. King's dedication to the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Karlin highlights the importance of Dr. King's ideals and the continuation of the fight for social justice.

Newspaper Clippings on Vietnam, January 1968

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

This document is a collage of newspaper clippings from the New York Time and the Washington Post on union leaders' positions on Vietnam. The boxed quotation is excerpted from a recent AFL-CIO convention.

Telegram from Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. to the SCLC Board of Strategy

Sunday, March 31, 1968

Just three days before the assassination, Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. asserts that removing Dr. King from the SCLC would be disastrous.

Letter from MLK to Willard T. Carter

Friday, December 27, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Willard Carter for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. King states that because of friends like them he can help end racial discrimination and segregation in the South.

Letters from Jeanette Allen Behre to MLKCharles. H. Behre to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Two professors of Columbia University, Dr. Jeanette Allen Behre and Chas. H. Behre Jr., express their dissent with Dr. King taking a public stand on the war in Vietnam. The professors feel Dr. King is jeopardizing his support for the civil rights.

Telegram from MLK to Eartha Kitt

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Dr. King thanks singer-actress Eartha Kitt for her generous support and deep concern for the people of Birmingham, Alabama, and elsewhere in the South. He extends his appreciation to those in the Harlem Apollo Theatre who have contributed in response to her example.

Christology and Anthropology

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher, a German philosopher, regarding the universal understanding of sins.

Letter from MLK to Dr. M. R. Cherry

Tuesday, September 27, 1966

Dr. King informs Dr. M. R. Cherry that he will be unable to accept his invitation to speak at Acadia University in Nova Scotia. King states that his schedule is busy as he is trying to spread social justice in America.

Field Foundation Station on the Death of MLK

Friday, April 5, 1968

A portion of the statement on the death of Dr. King from the Field Foundations states, "As at other times of national shame and self-despair, what is at issue now is how ell we as a nation shall respond morally and politically." The heart of this statement reminds readers that the "ugly scars of racism and poverty will not be eliminated in this country until the people will it to be done."

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

Letter from Nathan W. Turner to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965

The American Baptist Board of Education and Publication sends a contribution to the SCLC to assist with voter registration.

Letter from Arnold Krakower to MLK

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Attorney Arnold Krakower explains to Dr. King the reasons why he must reject a financial appeal to aid the SCLC. According to Krakower, Dr. King's position in the civil rights movement gave him high notoriety. However, once Dr. King turned his attention to oppose the war in Vietnam, Krakower believes he has no choice but to object mixing civil rights and foreign policy.

Letter from Derrick Cameron to MLK

Thursday, January 20, 1966

Derrick Cameron, a seventh grade student, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his fight in Civil Rights. In addition, Cameron offers to make copies on his ditto machine; a low-volume printing method used mainly by schools and churches.

Letter from Alma Opal to Dr. King

Friday, August 19, 1966

Mrs. Alma Opal informs Dr. King that he should use the word "proud," with complete caution. She also sends him a leaflet entitled, "Lawyer Troubles."

Helping Across the South

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

Letter From MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Friday, February 9, 1968

This response letter, dated February 9, 1968, was addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

Religious Education

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Letter from MLK Regarding Chicago Movement Efforts, Torn Document

With a future of brotherhood, freedom and harmony among all at the core of the fight for democracy, Dr. King, in this excerpt, stresses the need for support in the fight against injustice.