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Memorandum from James Framer to CORE Group Leaders

Monday, September 25, 1961

Jamer Framer, National Director of CORE, outlines several examples of legal and "extra-legal" harrassment of CORE and Freedom Riders by Mississippi officials.

Letter from Susan Drubin to SCLC

Ms. Drubin desires to make a monetary contribution to the SCLC to continue the work of Dr. King. As such, she writes to obtain more information about the procedures for contributing a percentage of her annual salary. She finalizes her letter by noting that she is taking a speech course in which she hopes to use the information sent to her to draft a speech.

Statement for Immediate Release from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, May 29, 1967

Harper & Row Publishers issued this press release to announce the arrival of Dr. King's final publication. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was his first written narrative, since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The release also noted that the book would address Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. The tentative date of publishing, according to the document, was June 19, 1967.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Dora McDonald updates Dr. King regarding the numerous letters, invitations, phone calls and other pending business matters while he has been away from the office. During this period of absence, Dr. King had been imprisoned and was now recovering at home.

Letter from Ehru E. Hart to SCLC

Wednesday, April 6, 1966

Hart sends commendations to Dr. King after hearing him speak, and requests copies of the speech.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Organ Recital

Sunday, May 9, 1954

This document is Dexter Avenue Baptist Church's Program for their "Dedication of Organ and Organ Recital."

Letter from MLK to Reverend M.C. Williams

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King writes to Reverend Williams of New Hope Baptist Church confirming receipt of a recent donation. He expresses gratitude for his continued support in the struggle for freedom.

Letter from MLK to Michael Swann

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh, Scotland on selected dates in 1967 and 1968. He assures the recipient of the letter that he is grateful for the invitation, however, he states that he already has commitments on the proposed dates.

Evil, Forgiveness, God

Dr. King references the Old Testament Book of Psalms regarding the topics of evil, forgiveness and God. He asserts that we must always treat the poor with love because God loves them.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962

In support of the Albany Movement, the Albany Manifesto was drafted to make clear what the proponents of the cause sought to resolve.

Worship

Dr. King defines worship.

Telegram from Paul Deitrich to John Lewis

Sunday, March 21, 1965

Paul Deitrich commends John Lewis for his speech in Washington and urges him to contact him whenever he is in Washington again. He also wants to express a much-delayed apology.

Governor Rockefeller Confirms Invitation to Speak at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

This letter dated September 2, 1965, was sent to Dr. King from Margaret Fowler, calendar Secretary to Gov. Rockefeller. In this letter Ms. Fowler confirms to Dr. King that the governor will be able to speak at the Men's Day Observance at Ebenezer Baptist Church on October 17, 1965.

Letter from the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Ulf Sviden, Chairman of the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch, sends Dr. King a congratulatory letter for his Nobel Peace Prize Award and an invitation to speak to the students of Stockholm.

MLK Handwritten Draft Letter

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the letter he received providing insights to an unknown problem.

Letter from MLK to Vance Hartke Regarding Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Vance Hartke's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Harper and Row is having difficulty publishing a paperback edition of "Where Do We Go From Here? "

World Journal Tribune: Dream and Demagogy

Thursday, April 6, 1967

The World Journal Tribune writes an article entitled "Dream and Demagogy." The article expounds upon Dr. King's involvement of foreign policy in opposition of the Vietnam War. The authors assert that Dr. King actions have crossed a "thin line" between responsible dissent and irresponsible divisiveness. The article criticizes Dr. King for his political activism and details the military's involvement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

SCLC Duties

This document outlines general responsibilities and specific duties of SCLC officers. Top level members listed include Dr. King, President, Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to President, Andrew Young, Program Director, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, Office Manager and Educational Consultant, and Ralph Abernathy, Financial Secretary-Treasurer. The document states that Dr. King's general responsibility as President is to "coordinate and interpret the total program of SCLC."

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, August 26, 1964

Dr. King is invited by A. Philip Randolph to attend a birthday party for well known Presbyterian minister, socialist and pacifist Norman Thomas. Randolph requests that Dr. King participate as a sponsor for Thomas' birthday celebration.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from Alfred Norwood to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Alfred Norwood writes to Dr. King highlighting his experiences as a student at Lincoln school, Berkeley, California.

Albany Movement Position Paper

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This paper states that segregation is both unconstitutional and immoral. It calls for a face-to-face meeting with the Albany, Georgia City Commission to discuss disposition of cases against the Albany Movement and a commitment to the First Amendment right of peaceful protest; clarification of the city’s position on the recent Interstate Commerce Commission ruling and desegregation of the city’s buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to recommend a timetable for desegregating lunch counters, the library, schools, and parks.

Conference on Strengthening the New Politiics

Sunday, November 28, 1965

The Conference on Strengthening the New Politics was formed from a desire to have real constituencies who have control over their elected officials and a concern for local grassroots political development. It is the hope of this conference that the styles of liberalism and the Civil Rights Movement could come together to form a new elective politic.

Letter from Fred C. Becker to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Fred C. Becker requests Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements where he plans on selling his books. Becker has published several of Dr. King's books in past.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 1, 1965

Annalee Stewart confirms with Dora McDonald that Dr. King will be the keynote speaker for the 50th Anniversary of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

New Wine in Old Bottles

Sunday, January 2, 1966

In a New Year's sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Dr. King addresses Matthew 9:17. His explains that new ideas or inspiration cannot thrive in closed minds or old structures, such as the idea of equality in a segregated society. While Victor Hugo's "idea whose time has come" may be here, Dr. King says, we need to "help time" and overcome the initial resistance to new ideas with persistence and a transformation of the old structures.

Letter from MLK to Donald Fletcher

Friday, November 22, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King offers his deep gratitude to the contribution made by Donald Fletcher. He acknowledges that because of the support of the contributors, the initiatives of the SCLC can continue to flourish.